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Today's News

  • Police Beat 10-17-14

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, serveda court summons, or issued a citation.
    Oct. 2

    7:30 p.m. — John Craven, 32 arrested through a warrant issued through the Los Alamos District Court. The warrant was for a Jan. 17 larceny (over $2,500, less than $20,000) committed at Todd Loop.

    11:12 a.m.— Andrea Herrera, 30, of Chamita was arrested through an order of commitment from the Los Alamos Municipal Court.

    1:24 p.m. — Luis Poncechitica, 29, of Medenales was arrested on a charge of proof of financial responsibility on N.M. 4.
    Oct. 3
    7 p.m. ­— Joey Martinez, 22, of Española was arrested through a warrant issued through the Los Alamos Magistrate Court. The warrant was for a reckless driving on N.M. 502 June 3.

    10 a.m. — Brad Tuning, 54, of Los Alamos was arrested through a warrant issued through the Los Alamos Magistrate Court.
    Oct. 4

    1:05 .a.m. — Angelina Naranjo, 32, of Santa Fe was arrested through a misdemeanor warrant issued through another jurisdiction at Trinity Drive.

  • Emergency crews find no gas leak at high school

    Emergency crews were dispatched to Los Alamos High School this morning with a report of a possible gas leak. The school was evacuated and students stayed outside as DPU and LAFD crews investigated. They did not find anything and students, teachers and other personnel were let back into the school about 8:30 a.m. A release from the county at 8:30 a.m. said, “LAFD reports no gas leak found, buildings have been turned back over to schools and teens entering now.” A later release from the county at 10 a.m. said, “crews responded because of reports of a smell of gas, but, there wasn’t a gas leak discovered. Students were not in danger.” 

  • Today in history Oct. 18
  • Update 10-17-14

    Ski Swap

     1-4 p.m. Saturday at Los Alamos Middle School. Public drop off 8-11 a.m.

    Crafts fair

    Fuller Lodge Art Center’s 37th Annual Juired “Gateway to the Holidays” Arts & Crafts Fair. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road.

    Viewing party

    The “Manhattan” TV series viewing party and discussion is scheduled for 8-9:30 p.m. Sunday at Time Out Pizzeria on Central Ave.

    Lunch With a Leader

    The League of Women Voters will have the monthly meeting at 11:45 a.m. Oct. 21 at Mesa Public Library. Lunch will be available from the LA Co-op Market for $10. To order lunch, call Karyl Ann Armbruster at 661-6605, or at kaskacayman@gmail.com. Lunch does not have to be ordered to attend the meeting. Lunch orders are due Sunday.

    Carnival

    Mountain Elementary Halloween Carnival. 4:30-7:30 p.m. today. Weather permitting, game booths will be outdoors on the upper playground. Festivities include the haunted house, book fair, cake walk, face painting, game booths and prizes. Tickets are $5 for 20; games are three tickets each, cake walk is four tickets and haunted house is five. All proceeds benefit the students of Mountain School through the PTA. 

  • EM head visits WIPP, LANL

     EM Acting Assistant Secretary Mark Whitney Thursday visited the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., where he became the first non-WIPP employee to tour the underground facility since a truck fire and unrelated radiological release temporarily closed the facility in February.
     “EM and the greater DOE is committed to reopening WIPP to support the important mission of cleaning up the nation’s legacy of nuclear waste,” Whitney said. “DOE’s highest priority is the safety, health and protection of the public, the workers, the community, and the environment.”
    Whitney also made a visit to the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    EM’s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco appreciated Whitney’s visit to WIPP.
    “We believe today’s tour of the underground facility represents a significant benchmark for progress toward resumption of normal activities at the facility,” Franco said. CBFO has responsibility for WIPP and the National Transuranic Program.
    A recovery plan outlining the necessary steps to resume operations at the transuranic waste disposal site was released in September, and CBFO staff and contractors have been actively engaged in accident investigations and recovery related activities since the early days following the events.

  • State Briefs 10-17-14

    Land Office nears
    record with $78M

    SANTA FE (AP) — The New Mexico State Land Office has earned more than $78 million for schools, hospitals and other beneficiaries of the state land trust.
    September’s earnings mark the second-highest monthly revenues in the history of the Land Office. The highest month on record was $79 million in December 2013.
    Land Commissioner Ray Powell says his office is working with the private sector, Native American tribes and federal agencies to boost the economic return of trust land through leases, renewable energy development and other projects.
    Of the most recent earnings, more than $65 million went to public schools and nearly $2 million went to state colleges and universities.
    More than $1.1 million went to special hospitals within the state, while $2.2 million went to public buildings, the state penitentiary and water reservoirs.

    Police: Food fight
    turns violent

  • Ex-POWs visit Japan

    TOKYO (AP) — The prisoners of war held in Tokyo's Omori POW camp saw some of the most horrific destruction during the last months of World War II, as American B-29 bombers dropped incendiary bombs that obliterated much of the city.
    But in those hungry times, they also were among the luckiest, says Bill Sanchez, 96, who along with two other former prisoners visited on Thursday the Heiwajima Kannon, a statue of the Goddess of Mercy built near the site of the former POW camp to mourn the war dead.
    Like many other POWs held in Omori, Sanchez was put to work loading and unloading cargo on the docks.
    "Which was great work because we had a lot of opportunities to pinch food. We learned real quick," said Sanchez, of Monterey Park, California, who watched as American fire bombs incinerated nearby neighborhoods.
    The Omori camp's barracks once occupied nearly half of a tiny island reclaimed from Tokyo Bay with help from prisoners like Sanchez. Today Heiwajima, or Peace Island, is barely distinguishable from the rest of Tokyo. The camp's former site is now a boat racing venue surrounded by bland office buildings.

  • Students allowed back in school after no gas leak is found — photos added

     

    Emergency crews were dispatched to Los Alamos High School this morning with a report of a possible gas leak.

    The school was evacuated and students stayed outside as DPU and LAFD crews investigated. They did not find anything and students, teachers and other personnel were let back into the school about 8:30 a.m.

    A release from the county at 8:30 a.m. said, “LAFD reports no gas leak found, buildings have been turned back over to Schools and teens entering now.”

    A later release from the county at 10 a.m. said, "crews responded because of reports of a smell of gas, but, there wasn’t a gas leak discovered. Students were not in danger."

  • Branding moves forward

    At last Friday’s Los Alamos County Council meeting, Councilor Pete Sheehey pulled a contract for general services agreement for branding services from Atlas Advertising, LLC, off the consent agenda. After considerable discussion, council approved the agreement by a 5–1 vote, with Sheehey voting no. Councilor Steve Girrens was not in attendance.
    The contract provides for $25,000 for brand logo design services, $25,000 for brand implementation plan services and $175,000 for brand execution services for a possible total of $225,000.00 plus applicable Gross Receipts Tax.
    Brand execution services would only be performed after the approval of the first two steps, with expenditures capped at $175,000 over a number of years and subject to future council approval.
    The goal is to implement recommendations made by North Star Destination Strategies. Council unanimously approved North Star’s report and branding suggestions at its May 6 meeting.

  • Council OKs DOE/NNSA land transfer to county

    The Los Alamos County Council also approved the transfer of parcel A-18 from DOE/NNSA to the county. The 523-acre parcel is located primarily within Pueblo Canyon, downstream of the wastewater treatment plant and north of the “Y” where N.M. 502 and N.M. 4 intersect. Three tracts of land within the parcel are reserved for “the benefit of the Pueblo of San Ildefonso.”
    The land will initially be zoned P-L (public lands) and may be rezoned once use is decided.
    Council had questions about use, since the property is located partially in Los Alamos County and partially in Santa Fe County.
    Since the purpose of the land transfers is economic development, Councilor David Izraelevitz asked which county would have taxing authority on the section located within Santa Fe County. He also asked if that land could be transferred to Los Alamos.
    Burgess confirmed that owning land within another county “presents interesting issues.” The taxable value of any activity would accrue to Santa Fe County.
    Burgess suggested approaching Santa Fe County to broker a deal for the transfer of the land. Any agreement have to be approved by the state legislature. The county owns other land transfer parcels within Santa Fe County as well.