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Today's News

  • Today in history Jan. 24
  • Today in history Jan. 25
  • LA comes out with win in tough game vs. Robertson

    It didn’t seem on paper the Los Alamos Hilltopper girls’ basketball game Friday night would be much more than a game the team had to get through, but it ended up being a nail-biter.
    Los Alamos thrived on its shooting from the perimeter in the first half, but when its opportunities became fewer in the second half, the Las Vegas Robertson Cardinals took advantage.
    Robertson trailed by as many as 8 points in the first half, its deficit at the break, but erased that deficit in just a little over 2 minutes to start the third quarter.
    The two teams battled neck-and-neck the balance of the way, but the Hilltoppers escaped Griffith Gymnasium with a 46-42 victory.
    Amber Logan came up huge for Los Alamos Friday night, particularly after the Cardinals (6-11) keyed on Ashlynn Trujillo and the Hilltopper big girls down low, limiting their chances throughout.
    Logan hit a huge 3-pointer early in the fourth quarter, giving Los Alamos a 41-37 edge at the time, then, with under 6 seconds left and the teams separated by just 2 points, connected on two huge free throws that finally sewed up the victory.
    Logan finished with 21 points, 14 of those in the first half as she came up with 4 3-pointers.

  • On Schedule 1-25-14

    Tuesday

    Girls basketball: Española Valley at Los Alamos, C team 4 p.m.; JV, 5:30 p.m.; varsity, 7 p.m.

    Wednesday

    Boys basketball: Los Alamos at Española Valley, C team 4 p.m.; JV, 5:30 p.m.; varsity, 7 p.m.

    Friday

    Girls basketball: Bernalillo at Los Alamos, C team 4 p.m.; JV, 5:30 p.m.; varsity, 7 p.m.

    Boys basketball: LAMS Invite, seventh and eighth grade, TBA.

    Wrestling: Los Alamos at Robertson Invite, varsity, TBA.

    Saturday

    Boys basketball: Los Alamos at Bernalillo, C team 4 p.m.; JV, 5:30 p.m.; varsity, 7 p.m.; LAMS Invite, seventh and eighth grade, TBA.

    Wrestling: Los Alamos at Robertson Invite, varsity, TBA.

  • Biscuit In the Basket

    Hilltopper Ben Roback watches his shot scoot into the goal during Friday night’s game against the La Cueva Bears.

  • Lewis & Todd 1-25-15
  • Program helps teens identify with community

    Opportunities for work in the teenage years can be limited. Youth Mobilizers, a program administered by the Family YMCA and funded by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB), seeks to provide teens with a way to identify community issues and address them through projects.
    Teens offer an outside perspective that can make all the difference in new and innovative growth. Including teens in important community issues, Youth Mobilizers then empowers them to change a perceived issue by employing them to fix it.
    Recreating the atmosphere of the job application process, a youth fills out a job application through the Family YMCA. This is followed with an interview to complete the application process. A project is then proposed by the teen that must meet one of the program’s goals:
    • Celebrate teens and their interests/accomplishments
    • Further teen skills and experience in an area of teen interest
    • Empower teens voice in the community regarding topics that are important to them
    After the project is approved, an adult from the program is paired with the teen to provide guidance through the process. The pair then meets and constructs a plan with the details of the project. Goals, timetables, and quality are discussed and included in this plan.

  • Program helps teens identify with community

    Opportunities for work in the teenage years can be limited. Youth Mobilizers, a program administered by the Family YMCA and funded by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB), seeks to provide teens with a way to identify community issues and address them through projects.
    Teens offer an outside perspective that can make all the difference in new and innovative growth. Including teens in important community issues, Youth Mobilizers then empowers them to change a perceived issue by employing them to fix it.
    Recreating the atmosphere of the job application process, a youth fills out a job application through the Family YMCA. This is followed with an interview to complete the application process. A project is then proposed by the teen that must meet one of the program’s goals:
    • Celebrate teens and their interests/accomplishments
    • Further teen skills and experience in an area of teen interest
    • Empower teens voice in the community regarding topics that are important to them
    After the project is approved, an adult from the program is paired with the teen to provide guidance through the process. The pair then meets and constructs a plan with the details of the project. Goals, timetables, and quality are discussed and included in this plan.

  • Are parents morally obligated to finance kids’ education?

    Today’s question, asked anonymously: “If parents can comfortably afford to send their child to college are they ethically obligated to do so?”
    As the time for submitting college applications rolls around, many parents are preparing to empty their wallets in order to send their children off to pursue a better education. But, ethically speaking, where is the limit, at what point (if there is one) do parents no longer have to subsidize their kid’s education?
    A brief answer, parents are generally morally obligated (presuming they are fully capable and the child desires post-secondary schooling) to pay for their child’s collegiate education. However, there are a few, limited situations, in which paying these costs, could be considered morally reprehensible.
    For example, if the child has had a history of truancy issues, drug use, or anything that would severely impair or impede on more education, there may be grounds for not providing the extra schooling. Despite these small odds, most parents are morally obligated to support their children.
    The parents brought their kids into this world, the least they could do (beyond what is legally required) is put their son or daughter on a path to success.

    Submit any interesting questions by email, at pondercolumnquestions@gmail.com.

  • What it means to have a Republican majority

    It’s time for your lawmakers to get to work. There is much to do this year, and we’re ready for the challenge.
    There is a lot of excitement in Santa Fe — the result of last year’s election. For the first time in 60 years, the people of New Mexico have chosen Republicans to lead the House of Representatives. It is an honor that we do not take lightly, and we promise to fight every day to advance our state.
    A lot of people ask me, “What does it mean now that Republicans are in the majority?” No matter who I talk to, whether they are Democrat or Republican, my answer never changes: Our goal is to put New Mexico’s families first.
    After all, the voters have spoken — they want an end to the politics as usual in Santa Fe. They want their leaders to reject the political dysfunction and gridlock that has become the hallmark of Washington, D.C. In the end, political games hurt our families and derail progress.
    Some may we have a daunting task ahead of us — they say it’s impossible for Republicans and Democrats to work together.
    I disagree. I believe we can come together. And we can start by working on common ground and finding ways to create good jobs for all New Mexicans.