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Today's News

  • LA woman struck by vehicle dies

    The Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service has confirmed that a long-time employee, Emily Mares-Lang, succumbed to the injuries she incurred when she was struck by a vehicle July 16.
    Mares-Lang died at CHRISTUS St. Vincent Hospital in Santa Fe, where she was taken after the incident.
    Mares-Lang was walking across Main Street when she was struck by a pickup truck driven by Steve Fode, 25, of Los Alamos. Mares-Lang was 71.
    Georgina Williams, the nurse service's executive director, said it is a sad day for the LAVNS family.
    “All of us here at Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service will miss her deeply,” she said. Mares-Lang was described by a LAVNS employees as a dedicated employee who worked in the LAVNS’ records department for eight years.
    Assistant District Attorney Kent Wahlquist said his office is waiting for the Los Alamos Police Department’s report on the accident, adding that the report’s findings will determine what they ultimately charge Fode with.
    Though Fode was charged with careless driving at the scene of the accident, the DA’s office formally withdrew the charges over double jeopardy issues due to the severity of Mares-Lang’s condition.

  • Hidden in plain sight: Poverty in LA

    Forbes ranked Los Alamos County the third wealthiest county in the United States this year. The county also has the highest number of millionaires, according to Phoenix Marketing International. Livability.com just named Los Alamos the best small town in the country.
    So it is very hard for most people to believe that poverty exists in the county.
     “I think there is a perception that Los Alamos doesn’t have poverty. In areas of affluence, sometimes the issues of poverty become invisible. And it is true in Los Alamos that the great majority of people are doing rather well,” said Ellen Morris Bond, executive director for Self Help, Inc., a program dedicated to enhancing life skills and empowering individuals by providing programs and services that focus on developing self-reliance.
     “Whenever I do public talks, people are kind of shocked at my reports of what I deal with on the ground here, as an agency that deals with struggling people in Los Alamos almost every day. Every day I hear and see and meet with families that struggle to stay here.”
    Statistics show that 3.9 percent of the county’s population lives in poverty, based on such things as the number of food stamp recipients. And the story does not stop there.

  • Hunger Week, Summit address larger issues

    The Los Alamos County Council joined the New Mexico legislature in declaring July 14−18 as Hunger Week.
    Hunger Week — initiated to raise awareness about hunger throughout the state — coincided with the first End Hunger in New Mexico Summit, sponsored by the North Central New Mexico Economic Development District Non-Metro Area Agency on Aging and the New Mexico Aging and Long-Term Services Department. The summit took place July 17−18.
    “When people think of individuals or families going hungry, they often think of people living in extreme poverty, living in some distant land,” said Tim Armer, Executive Director for the NCNMEDD.
    “It might surprise them that there are many people experiencing hunger right here in New Mexico and most likely right in their own neighborhoods. People can have a house, a car and a job but still struggle with putting food on the table.”
    Here are some statistics about hunger in New Mexico provided by summit organizers.
    • New Mexico is one of the highest states facing food insecurity with at least 40,000 New Mexicans seeking food assistance each week, including many children or senior citizens. Currently New Mexico ranks No. 1 in the nation for childhood hunger and second for senior hunger.

  • On The Docket 7-23-14

    July 21

    Mark A. Martinez pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Magistrate Court for racing on highways. Defendant incurred no fines but was ordered to pay $81 in court costs. Defendant was also ordered to undergo 30 days of unsupervised probation.

    Probation conditions include:
    Defendant shall notify the court of any change of address within 48 hours. Defendant shall obey all federal, state and local laws. Upon successful completion of deferral conditions charge(s) will be dismissed. Deferral period shall be 30 days. Defendant shall refrain from receiving any other citations during the deferment period. If the defendant fails to comply with the requirements set forth, the deferment agreement shall be forfeited. Deferred fines will be imposed and citation(s) will be reported to the Department of Motor Vehicles accordingly. A bench warrant may be issued for the defendant’s arrest.
    July 22

  • LANL scientists honored

     Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists Allison Aiken, Bette Korber and Alan Perelson have been named to Thomson Reuters list of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds.”
    “To have three of our premier scientists recognized on this list is a great honor and attests to the intellectual vitality that feeds the breadth of disciplines essential to our national security mission,” said Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charles McMillan.
    “The fact that one of those named is a former student and postdoctoral researcher makes me confident that our pipeline programs are actively inspiring future generations of scientific excellence.”
    Alan Perelson
    “It is an honor to have the value of my work recognized and to be included in this list,” Perelson, of the Laboratory’s Theoretical Biology and Biophysics group, said. “However, the real success in my area of modeling infectious disease only comes when the work has an impact on treating diseases such as HIV, influenza and hepatitis and ultimately in saving lives.”

  • Update 07-23-14

    Pet adoption

    Mobile pet adoption sponsored by Friends of the Shelter. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday in front of the new Smith’s Marketplace.

    APP meeting

    The Arts in Public Places Advisory Board will meet Thursday. The meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. in council chambers.

    Lecture

    Authors Speak Series. Steven F. Havill. Novelist will discuss recently released “Night Zone, a Posadas County mystery.” 7 p.m. Thursday at the Mesa Public Library Upstairs Rotunda.

    Downtown Dogs

    A weekly walking group for dogs and humans. The walk starts from Pet Pangaea at 6 p.m. on Thursday nights for a stroll around downtown Los Alamos.

    Farmers Market

    County officials announced there would be no councilors’ booth at Thursday’s Farmers Market.

    Friday's concert

    Gordon’s Summer Concert Series presents Ray Wylie Hubbard, with opening act the Bill Hearne Trio. The concert will be at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond.  

  • Creedon confirmed as NNSA deputy administrator

    Madelyn Creedon was confirmed by the Senate Wednesday as the Department of Energy’s Principal Deputy Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).
    “Madelyn Creedon’s confirmation comes at a critical point for the National Nuclear Security Administration,” said Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. “She is well-prepared for her new role at the Department as it follows a long career of public service in national security, including at the Department of Defense, with the Senate Armed Services Committee, and, previously, at the Department of Energy. NNSA Administrator Klotz and I thank the Senate for their attention to Madelyn’s nomination, and look forward to working with her.”
    As NNSA’s Principal Deputy Administrator, Creedon will support NNSA Administrator Frank Klotz in the management and operation of the NNSA, as well as policy matters across the DOE and NNSA enterprise in support of President Obama’s nuclear security agenda.

  • HGH use is rising among teens

    NEW YORK (AP) — Experimentation with human growth hormones by America's teens more than doubled in the past year, as more young people looked to drugs to boost their athletic performance and improve their looks, according to a new, large-scale national survey.
    In a confidential 2013 survey of 3,705 high school students, being released Wednesday by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 11 percent reported using synthetic HGH at least once — up from about 5 percent in the four preceding annual surveys. Teen use of steroids increased from 5 percent to 7 percent over the same period, the survey found.
    Travis Tygart, CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, depicted the numbers as alarming but not surprising, given the extensive online marketing of performance-enhancing substances and near-total lack of any drug testing for high school athletes.
    "It's what you get when you combine aggressive promotion from for-profit companies with a vulnerable target — kids who want a quick fix and don't care about health risk," Tygart said in an interview. "It's a very easy sell, unfortunately."
    Nine percent of teen girls reported trying synthetic HGH and 12 percent of boys.

  • Central Avenue construction

    Even though there’s a lot of construction going on at Central Avenue, local businesses are doing all they can to remind residents they are open, as the banner on CB Fox’ front window demonstrates.

  • Ghost Bike honors son, classmate

    Described as athletic, handsome and smart, Forrest Fukushima was just 19 years old when a drunk driver on N.M. 502 killed him in 1986.
    An avid bicyclist, Forrest was training for the “Iron Horse Bicycle Classic” competition when a car driven by Alex Naranjo struck him.
    According to newspaper reports at the time, a tire on Naranjo’s vehicle blew out, which made the accident “unavoidable,” according to police reports. However, sobriety tests done at the scene also revealed that Naranjo had a blood alcohol level of .18 at the time of the accident. She was arrested for driving while intoxicated.
    Naranjo is currently running unopposed for a municipal court judgeship in Española.
    Though the tragedy has long since faded from headlines, his fellow classmates from Los Alamos High School never forgot him, and whenever they’d cross paths professionally or socially, Fukushima’s name would come up.
    Now, almost 30 years later, two of Fukushima’s classmates decided to make their remembrance permanent. Lisa Hecker and Ismael Mena, classmates of Fukushima’s, worked together to install a “ghost bike” near the crash site.