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Today's News

  • Perraglio named county CFO

    Helen Perraglio will be the new county chief financial officer, replacing Joe D’Anna who will retire in July. Helen joined the County a little less than five years ago, after working for Santa Fe County where she was the Accounting Oversight and Financial Reporting Manager.
    Perraglio is also a Certified Public Accountant with an extensive background in governmental accounting, reporting and auditing. She is currently the deputy chief financial officer.
    Deputy County Manager Steve Lynne said this morning that he was delighted that Helen has accepted the position.
    “Helen has done great work at the County since she joined us and I know that she will continue to add tremendous value to the Finance division and the entire County in this new position,” he said.
    Helen will move into her new position on Monday to begin the CFO transition process with D’Anna and will be earning a yearly salary of $124,224.

  • VP Pence avoids political fray surrounding him

    BY KEN THOMAS AND CATHERINE LUCEY
    Associated Press

  • Meet Topper Freshman Academy candidates

    The community will get a chance to meet the two candidates for Topper Freshman Academy Principal on Monday in the Speech Theater.
    The position became available after the academy’s principal, Carter Payne, was selected as the new principal at Los Alamos High School. Payne will start as principal at LAHS July 1.
    To meet candidates for the Topper Freshman Academy, visit the Speech Theater at these times:
    • 5:30 p.m.: Jill Gonzales is the principal of Piñon Elementary School at Los Alamos Public Schools.  She has 10 years of administrative experience, which also includes Assistant principal of Bonita Vista High School in Chula Vista, California.  Her teaching experience includes US History and AVID at the High School and served as an Educational Advisor and Activities Director in Redondo Beach, CA.  Jill received a Bachelor of the Arts in Political Science from the University of California and a Master of Arts in Educational Administration from California State University.

  • Senior center play touches on aging issues

    The Los Alamos Little Theater performed a short, 10-minute play on Wednesday at the Los Alamos Senior Center called “Dead Right,” written by Elaine Jarvik.
    Director Pat Beck welcomed everyone to their theater and introduced the actors to the audience. She explained that this performance was a partnership between the Los Alamos Little Theatre, the senior centers and local playwright Robert Benjamin. “It’s not only a short play that you get to enjoy, but also a discussion with me and the actors,” said Beck. She explained that this staged reading touches on issues relating to aging and then briefly set the scene: “This play is about a couple who are having breakfast and reading the paper.”

  • Jemez Springs event to raise funds for veterans

    Fun, food and music will take over Jemez Springs Saturday, as 11 bands will help the community raise funds to help homeless veterans.

    The event is sponsored by Homeless Veterans No Mas, an organization started by local radio personality Dotie Brown, Larry Waisner, Don Conger and others.

    The concerts, which cost $5 for adults and $2 for children, will raise money to support the Fisher House Organization.

    The organization’s goal is to raise money for Fisher house, an organization that provides nearby housing for families who have veterans hospitalized at a Veteran’s Administration hospital.

    Homeless Veterans No Mas is trying to raise $25,000 to help get a “Fisher House” built near the Raymond G. Murphy VA Medical Center in Albuquerque.

    The concerts will be on two stages, the main one, which will feature acts at the Jemez Valley Community Center, and the other stage, which will feature more acoustic acts at the town’s gazebo.

    Homeless Veterans No Mas started in earnest over an experience Waisner had with a friend, who also happened to be a veteran. While Waisner kept up with his friend through the years, there came a day when someone contacted him to tell him that his friend had died of exposure.

    “He had died because he was homeless,” Brown said.

  • Cancellations, postponements caused by today's weather

    Bike To Work Day events cancelled 

    This afternoon's Bike to Work Day events have been cancelled for today due to snow, according to county reports.

    Summer Concert Series moved to Fuller Lodge

    The Gordon Summer Concert Series featuring Chuchito Valdes, scheduled to play at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, has been moved to Fuller Lodge. Show is still free.

  • LAPD reports a dog attack at Rover Park

    The Los Alamos Police Department is asking the public with assistance in identifying the owners of a dog that attacked another dog this past weekend. The incident happened around 11:00 a.m. this past Sunday at Rover Park in White Rock.

    The suspect dog was described as possibly a male “cane corso”, or a very similar looking mastiff type dog that is black in color and weighing around 100 pounds. Reportedly,a couple with a stroller came to get the dog under control after it attacked another dog while being on a leash with its owner. The dog that was attacked suffered injuries that required treatment from a veterinarian.

    Anybody with information concerning this case is asked to call the Los Alamos Police Department at 662-8222.  

  • New Mexico mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus

    SANTA FE (AP) — State health officials say mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus have been found in Dona Ana County.

    The New Mexico Department of Health says it's the first time this season that the mosquito species has been found in that part of the state.

    Mosquito surveillance in New Mexico's southern counties is part of an ongoing joint project to map the range and distribution of the species that can transmit the Zika virus.

    Zika virus can be transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito.

    The mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus.
    Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites.

    Ten cases of Zika virus disease were reported in New Mexico last year.
     

  • Sportsmen gain new access, campsites on state lands

    Sportsmen have 141 new access points in 14 counties and two new campsites near Carlsbad on state lands, the State Land Office announced today.

    Of the new access points, 124 are open to walk-ins and 17 are accessible by vehicle. In all, there are now 345 access points and 11 campsites on state lands.

    “Land ownership patterns in New Mexico tend to lock sportsmen out, but as promised I have been working with our lessees to create a more open and positive experience for hunters and anglers,” said State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn. “Hunting is deeply rooted in our cultural heritage and my office is doing all we can to preserve these traditions.”

    Nearly all of the 9 million acres of surface estate managed by Dunn and the State Land Office are leased for livestock grazing and cropland production, and during New Mexico’s hunting season are open to hunters, anglers and trappers with a valid license and all applicable permits, stamps or validations.

    The State Land Office is partnering with the state Department of Game and Fish and the Bureau of Land Management to offer mobile maps of New Mexico’s big-game hunting units, hunting access points, and more through the “CarryMap” application.

  • PEEC hosts grrreat Bear Festival

    On Saturday morning, the Nature Center was packed with booths, families and bear paraphernalia.

    The Pajarito Environmental and Education Center (PEEC) teamed up with the Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation (LEWF) to host New Mexico’s first Bear Festival.

    This festival brought national, state, local and independent organizations together with the sole mission of bear education and appreciation.

    PEEC Director of Interpretation Jonathan Creel explained that their hope is to be “raising awareness of how to coexist with bears,” like the steps to take in bear proofing your home and life.

    Creel gave credit to their partnership with LEWF and said, “The Land of Enchantment was huge in this whole thing. They put in a lot of time and effort, especially with the bear dinner the night before.”

    Dr. Kathleen Ramsay launched LEWF in order to assist bear rehabilitation efforts across New Mexico. Similar to PEEC, their mission is to make Los Alamos bear friendly and bear aware. Because bears are such intelligent, habitual creatures,