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Today's News

  • CROP Walk participation inspires community

    This year’s CROP Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot is raring to go with enthusiasm.
    Among those preparing for Sunday’s event are Ted Williams and Vincent Chiravalle. Each of these gentlemen has committed energy to help this great community effort succeed. The race starts at 2 p.m. in Los Alamos Middle School cafeteria. Registration begins at 1 p.m.
    The CROP Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot has been held annually in Los Alamos since 1997.
    Williams has been involved in Atomic City Roadrunners for 30 years and is a co-creator of the CROP Walk/Turkey Trot event. Each year, he takes care of reserving the middle school, measuring and marking the course, timing the runners and walkers and other details. Ted notes that, before the CROP Walk was added to it, the last race of the season for the Atomic City Roadrunners would always be a Turkey Trot, held on North Mesa around Thanksgiving time.

  • Negative ads allowed Martinez to choose her opponent

    Did Susana Martinez’s campaign strategists influence the selection of her opponent? Did the Martinez machine want Gary King to be the Democratic nominee for governor?
    Brian Sanderoff thinks so.
    That was one of several points Sanderoff made in a recent talk about the forces at work in this year’s election. Despite how we prefer to think of ourselves, in many ways we voters are the captives of trends, from ethnic preferences to the unpopularity of sixth-year presidents.
    Sanderoff is president of Research and Polling and a respected analyst of New Mexico politics.
    In the Democratic primary, we recall, there were five candidates, three Hispanic and two Anglo. The Martinez campaign ran TV commercials during the primary against candidate Alan Webber. The intention, said Sanderoff, was to draw Anglo votes from Webber, which would tend to shift to King. With Hispanic voters divided, that would put King on top.  
    King, Sanderoff explained, would be the easiest candidate to beat because he has the longest public record. He has served eight years as attorney general and 10 years in the Legislature. That enabled the Martinez opposition researchers to find negative gems like the building in Moriarty that has no doubt become the best-known lease in state history.

  • Right-to-work gets a second wind

    As Republican legislators update goals in light of their newly won House majority, right-to-work is waking from a long slumber.
    Right-to-work laws prohibit union membership as a condition of employment. Republicans and the business community have long believed right-to-work would be good for economic development — a signal that the state is business friendly. Unions, Democrats and advocates for working people have always said that weakened unions would mean lower wages and deteriorating working conditions.
    Right-to-work has come up repeatedly, but hasn’t been a big issue for decades. In 1978, it was so hot that Bruce King almost lost his election to Joe Skeen. As governor, King vetoed right-to-work in 1979. When that veto was challenged, the state Supreme Court upheld its legality.
    For a sneak preview of the debate to come, look at the legislative session of 1981, when a gaggle of right-to-work supporters took office. One was Sen. Mickey Barnett, R-Portales, who introduced a right-to-work bill.
    House Minority Leader Hoyt Pattison, R-Clovis, argued: “The fact is, the people of our state and our nation don’t like to be told that they have to do something.” They don’t like to be told they have to pay dues to hold a job, especially when dues are used to support political candidates.

  • http://www.lamonitor.com/content/report-truck-crash-released

    As Republican legislators update goals in light of their newly won House majority, right-to-work is waking from a long slumber.
    Right-to-work laws prohibit union membership as a condition of employment. Republicans and the business community have long believed right-to-work would be good for economic development — a signal that the state is business friendly. Unions, Democrats and advocates for working people have always said that weakened unions would mean lower wages and deteriorating working conditions.
    Right-to-work has come up repeatedly, but hasn’t been a big issue for decades. In 1978, it was so hot that Bruce King almost lost his election to Joe Skeen. As governor, King vetoed right-to-work in 1979. When that veto was challenged, the state Supreme Court upheld its legality.
    For a sneak preview of the debate to come, look at the legislative session of 1981, when a gaggle of right-to-work supporters took office. One was Sen. Mickey Barnett, R-Portales, who introduced a right-to-work bill.
    House Minority Leader Hoyt Pattison, R-Clovis, argued: “The fact is, the people of our state and our nation don’t like to be told that they have to do something.” They don’t like to be told they have to pay dues to hold a job, especially when dues are used to support political candidates.

  • Today in history Nov. 19
  • Briefs 11-16-14

     

    Bradbury Museum 

    to open new exhibit

     

    The Bradbury Science Museum will display the Saul Hertz exhibit today to Jan. 31. Hertz was a pioneer in nuclear medicine.

    “The importance of Dr. Hertz’s early work in nuclear medicine and his connection to the Manhattan Project convinced me this would be a wonderful Bradbury show,” Museum Director Linda Deck said. 

  • County council tables two ordinances

     

     The Los Alamos County Council ended its short Friday session by tabling the two main items of business on the agenda: a public hearing on the “chicken ordinance” which would allow those in residential districts to keep up to six chickens and a proposal to provide shuttle service to the ski hill. 

    Friday meetings have a hard stop time of 1:30 p.m. Approximately halfway into the session, Chair Geoff Rodgers weighed the situation and informed several members of the public waiting to comment on the chicken ordinance that council would have to table it for a later date. 

    Citizens were given an opportunity to make their comments, but all chose to wait for the rescheduled hearing. 

  • LA company recognized by Northern New Mexico 20/20 campaign

     

    The Northern New Mexico 20/20 Campaign just exceeded its goal of identifying 20 high-growth companies in the region before the year 2020 with the nine inductees awarded last Thursday. To date, 25 businesses in northern New Mexico have been honored for creating jobs and bringing revenue to the region.

    To qualify as a nominee, companies must have a proven and developed product or service, two or more customers with 50 percent or more of their revenues coming from outside New Mexico, financial profitability and a solid plan for growth. A range of local elected officials, city and county governments and entrepreneurial support organizations provided the nominations, and each candidate went through a competitive screening process.

  • Schools make the grade in LA

     

    The Los Alamos Public Schools have done it again. The school district has managed to catch the attention of yet another website that ranks school systems nationally. In this ranking, LAPS’ five elementary schools took the top spots one through five for its category in the whole state.

    Here’s how Niche.com, a website that specializes in ranking places, colleges and schools, so “people can find their niche and thrive in it,” ranked the elementary schools in its “Best Elementary Schools In New Mexico” category:

    1. Chamisa

    2. Mountain

    3. Barranca Mesa

    4. Aspen

  • Renovated Aspen school rededicated