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Today's News

  • New Mexico rebuilds financial reserves after budget crisis

    SANTA FE (AP) — A top finance official says New Mexico state government has a bigger financial cushion than anticipated.
    Finance and Administration Deputy Secretary Stephanie Schardin Clarke told a panel of lawmakers Monday that the state entered the fiscal year on July 1 with reserves equal to 5.3 percent of annual spending obligations, and expects to maintain a 3 percent cushion at the end the current fiscal year in June 2018.
    Estimates based on earlier revenue forecasts had the state nearly running out of cash by mid-2018, threatening the New Mexico's credit rating and its access to low borrowing costs on infrastructure projects.
    To shore up shaky state finances, the Democratic-led Legislature and Republican Gov. Susana Martinez agreed in May to tap into borrowed money from suspended infrastructure projects.
     

  • New Mexico professor seeks to save moon-landing sites

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — A New Mexico State University anthropology professor is on a mission to save moon-landing sites.
    Beth O'Leary is speaking this week in Washington, D.C., on preserving the spots where humans stepped on the surface of the moon.
    She is giving presentations at the National Geographic Society and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum to coincide with the 48th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission.
    Her new book, "The Final Mission: Preserving NASA's Apollo Sites," looks at the exploration of space from an archaeological and historical-preservation perspective. It also details how various sites in New Mexico, Texas, California, and Florida contributed to the successful Apollo mission.
    O'Leary says the Apollo 11 landing site at Tranquility Base, where humans stepped foot on the moon, should be named a National Historic landmark.
     

  • Police Beat 7-16-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    July 4
    11:21 p.m. — Garrett Eckhart, 36, of Los Alamos was arrested for disorderly conduct, resisting or evading an officer and battery upon a peace officer.

    11:29 p.m. — LAPD arrested an individual for driving while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.

    July 5
    1:39 a.m. — Phillip Swazo, 28, of Santa Fe was arrested for driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor and/or drugs, open container and failure to display a valid registration plate.

    3:34 a.m. — Sherry Lynn Francisco, 57, of Harper, Texas was arrested for driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor and/or drugs.

    5:35 a.m. — Los Alamos Police reported found property.

    10 a.m. — LAPD cited an individual on Kwage Mesa Trail for an animal at large.

    1:54 p.m. — Los Alamos Police reported a license plate was removed from a parked vehicle.

  • On the Docket 7-16-17

    May 23
    Scott Newman was found guilty of failing to follow the regulations of weed, brush piles, refuse and rubbish. Sentence was deferred until July 21.

    Michelle Kirsh was found guilty of failing to stop/yield at a traffic sign. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    May 24
    Robert Ward was found guilty of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    Ronny Lujan was fined $50 for passing in a no passing zone and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    May 25
    David Nicholaeff pleaded no contest to speeding 11 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and must pay $65 in court costs.

    Damian Andres Vasquez pleaded no contest to speeding 11 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit and also failure to provide a proper operator’s/chauffeur’s license. Defendant was sentenced to community service, defensive driving school and community service. The sentence was deferred until July 23.

    Juan Carlos Hernandez-Carmona pleaded no contest to speeding 11 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit and also failure to provide a proper operator’s/chauffeur’s license. The sentence was deferred until July 23.

  • County to host horse show July 22

    It’s time for all riders to showcase their equestrian talents in Western and English categories at the annual Los Alamos County Horse Show at Brewer Arena July 22, starting at 9 a.m.
    The Los Alamos County Horse Show offers four age categories (ages 9 and under), 10–13, 14–18 and adult, and many different horsemanship class categories.
    The fees range from $5 per youth class entry, $8 per adult class entry, and $30 per family (four or more participants from immediate family living in the same household).
    Prizes include place ribbons, horse show t-shirts and buckles.
    Pre-registration is through at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    Submit forms to the Parks, Recreation’s Administrative offices at the Aquatic Center.
    For more information, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us or email lacrec@lacnm.us.

  • Mountaineers to meet July 25 about Shackleton traverse

    The Los Alamos Mountaineers will meet at 6:45 p.m. July 25 at the Los Alamos Nature Center for a presentation by Rich Spritz, as he shares his experience recreating the Shackleton traverse.
    “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honor and recognition in event of success,” Spritz said of the adventure.
    The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-17 was a Grand Failure, from which Sir Ernest Shackleton emerged as a great leader.
    Spritz took part in a National Geographic mini-expedition to recreate the historic Shackleton traverse of South Georgia for the 100th anniversary. Safe return doubtful.
    Social starts at 6:45 p.m., followed by reports of recent and upcoming trips at 7 p.m. Program starts at 7:30 p.m.

  • MOWW to meet at Sheriff’s Posse Shack Tuesday

    The Military Order of the World Wars will meet Tuesday for its annual picnic.
    The meeting will be in the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack on North Mesa. (Note the change in location for this month’s meeting only.)
    This month’s speaker is Rick Wallace, Ph.D., who will discuss the astronomical significance of the sun, summer solstice and its resulting seasons. He will also talk about eclipses especially the one that will cross the United States on Aug. 21.
    The Posse Shack is on North Mesa Road. Take Diamond Drive east through the Golf Course and straight through the traffic circle and up the hill. Follow the road around for about one mile. The shack is on the left, and there is parking on both sides of the street.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The cost of the dinner is $25 per person.
    Call Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 for reservations. A reservation is a commitment to pay. Dinner is scheduled to be Smokin Bear BBQ with appropriate sides.

  • Community Calendar 7-16-17

    TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 10:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: From Earth to the Universe at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Enjoy 180 degrees of entertainment. Join us on a colorful and inspiring journey through our universe. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    The New Mexico Alzheimer’s Association will offer a one-hour session from 1-2 p.m. on July 17 in the lower level classroom of the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The session will focus on the early stages of Alzheimer’s to include symptoms, coping strategies for caregivers and resources to help families who are challenged with dementia. For more information, contact David Davis 505-473-1297 or dldavis@alz.org.

    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local families for fun, hands-on activities, hikes, games, and stories in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
    TUESDAY

  • Pet Talk: Protecting your pet from the summer heat

    Summer time in Texas means more time to play outside, go swimming, and soak up the sun. However, warmer temperatures also mean that pets may be more susceptible to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. To help pet owners avoid these risks, Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, offered some insight.
    “Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are major problems for pets in the summer, especially in short nosed breeds, such a pug or a bulldog,” Eckman said.  “These conditions can occur during hot and humid days and even cooler days, if your pets aren’t accustomed to the heat.”

    Heat exhaustion is the early stages of a heat stroke and causes lethargy, vomiting, and weakness. Following continued exercise or exposure to heat, Eckman said a heat stroke can occur with more severe signs, including extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and pale mucous membranes.  This can lead significant problems up to and including death if not recognized and treated immediately.

  • 3 N.M. congressional delegates sponsor bill to repeal Trump’s election commission

    U.S. Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham touted a bicameral bill they introduced Friday to repeal President Donald Trump’s election commission order that they said especially intimidated “people of color.”

    “The bill is supported by more than 90 members of Congress, including every Democratic Senator of color,” according to the joint press release issued by the three New Mexico congressional members Friday.

    “The right to vote is one of the most sacred and fundamental rights in our democracy,” Udall said. “President Trump’s voter suppression commission is nothing more than a cynical and shameful attempt to intimidate voters – particularly people of color – delegitimize our electoral process, and discourage participation in government.

    New Mexico’s Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver has refused to comply with the Presidential Advisory Commission’s request to share sensitive voter roll data.