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Today's News

  • Brave New Brass to play at Fuller Lodge

    The community is invited to enjoy a lunchtime performance by Brave New Brass during the Brown Bag Lunch March 1 at Fuller Lodge.
    Brave New Brass is a brass ensemble formed in Los Alamos, based on previous brass quintets organized by Dave and Deniece Korzekwa.
    The members of Brave New Brass have a broad interest in the music available for small brass ensembles of various combinations, and have been performing as a group in Los Alamos since 2012.
    Members of the group are all local Los Alamos musicians, with Elizabeth Hunke (French horn), Deniece Korzekwa (tuba), Dave Korzekwa (trumpet), Mandy Marksteiner (trumpet) and Bruce Warren (trombone). \As an applied mathematician at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Hunke develops and maintains the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model, CICE, which is used in numerous climate-modeling centers around the world. In her spare time she plays horn with several Los Alamos ensembles, and she is active in the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots that provides scholarship opportunities for women and aviation education in the community.

  • Spellbound in the magical Yukon

    By Debbie Stone

    Special to the Monitor

  • Biologists find cave life that may be 50,000 years old

    BOSTON (AP) — In a Mexican cave system so beautiful and hot that it is called both Fairyland and hell, scientists have discovered life trapped in crystals that could be 50,000 years old.
    The bizarre and ancient microbes were found dormant in caves in Naica, Mexico, and were able to exist by living on minerals such as iron and manganese, said Penelope Boston, head of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute. .
    “It’s super life,” said Boston, who presented the discovery Friday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston.
    If confirmed, the find is yet another example of how microbes can survive in extremely punishing conditions on Earth.
    Though it was presented at a science conference and was the result of nine years of work, the findings haven’t yet been published in a scientific journal and haven’t been peer reviewed. Boston planned more genetic tests for the microbes she revived both in the lab and on site.
    The life forms – 40 different strains of microbes and even some viruses – are so weird that their nearest relatives are still 10 percent different genetically. That makes their closest relative still pretty far away, about as far away as humans are from mushrooms, Boston said.

  • ‘The Other Place’ to open Friday

    Los Alamos Little Theatre tackles a play about life, loss, and nothing is as it seems with its newest play, “The Other Place.”
    The drama opens Friday and centers on Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist who is on the brink of a breakthrough in her field, but the rest of her life is unraveling. Her husband has filed for divorce, her daughter has eloped with a much older man and her own health is in jeopardy.
    Piece by piece, a mystery unfolds as fact blurs with fiction, past collides with present, and the elusive truth about Smithton boils to the surface.
    Gwen Lewis, director, was drawn to this play because “Sharr White did a beautiful, tasteful job writing about a very difficult situation. The characters of Juliana and Ian go from professionals to a place that is new and challenging for both of them. Both explore feelings of helplessness, which the audience will be able to relate to,” she said.
    Just as Smithton’s research leads to a potential breakthrough, events take a disorienting turn.
    During a lecture to colleagues at an exclusive beach resort, she glimpses an enigmatic young woman in a yellow bikini amidst the crowd of business suits. But in this brilliantly crafted work, nothing is as it seems.

  • Bill to ban traps on public lands stalls

    BY ANDREW OXFORD
    The New Mexican

  • Fiddle fundraiser a success

    The Fancy Fiddle Fundraiser Saturday at Fuller Lodge drew more than 120 people, according to organizers.
    All of the more than 40 decorated violins, violas, cellos and basses were won, according to Joanna Gillespie, executive director of the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation.
    Proceeds from Saturday’s auction will benefit the Los Alamos Public Schools orchestra program. The instruments were older instruments that were used by the school and painted by local artists.
    The foundation will total the final amount donated from the auction today.

  • LA Community Winds presents Mussorgsky Masterpiece

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present its mid-Winter concert at 7 p.m. Saturday at White Rock Baptist Church.
    The concert will feature marches, original music for concert band, as well as music from film and television.
    The featured work on the program is Modeste Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.”
    Written in honor of his artist friend, Victor Hartmann,“Pictures at an Exhibition” takes the listener on a stroll amongst paintings and sketches depicting the Russian people, legends, and myths. Each movement is separated by a “promenade” literally intended to be heard while walking from one gallery to the next. Sadly, only a few of the original Hartmann paintings exist.
    Originally written for piano, the work has achieved much greater fame and recognition in the concert hall due to its being transcribed for orchestra in 1922 by Maurice Ravel (at the request of famed conductor Serge Koussevitzky.) Ravel was able to exploit more fully the coloristic possibilities the work contained despite the “monochromatic” quality of the original.
    While Ravel’s orchestration was not the first created for orchestra, it has certainly become the most famous.

  • SpaceX aborts approach to space station, delivery delayed

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A navigation error forced SpaceX to delay its shipment to the International Space Station on Wednesday, following an otherwise smooth flight from NASA's historic moon pad.
    SpaceX's supply ship, the Dragon, was less than a mile from the orbiting outpost when a problem cropped up in the GPS system. The approach was aborted, and the Dragon backed away. NASA said neither the station nor its six-person crew was in any danger, and another attempt would be made Thursday.
    "As a pilot it is sometimes better to accelerate and circle around than attempt a difficult landing," French astronaut Thomas Pesquet said in a tweet from the space station. "Same in space — we'll be ready tomorrow!"
    Just a few hours earlier, Russia successfully launched a cargo ship from Kazakhstan, its first since a failed launch in December.
    SpaceX launched the Dragon capsule Sunday from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A, out of action since NASA's space shuttle program ended in 2011. It's the same spot where astronauts flew to the moon in the late 1960s and early 1970s. SpaceX has a 20-year lease with NASA for 39A; besides launching station cargo from there, the company hopes to send up astronauts as early as next year.

  • Chandler joins LANL coalition

    Los Alamos County Council member Chris Chandler will be the county’s representative on the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities.
    Chandler replaces former Council representative Kristin Henderson, who served on the board for about a year.
    The coalition is currently in Washington D.C. with several other commission members attending the Energy Communities Alliance meeting to discuss issues concerning the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Those issues include the upcoming management and operations contract switch for LANL and ongoing environmental cleanup efforts of certain LANL sites.
    “I think it’s a very important thing to work with our fellow communities who have a relationship with the lab,” Chandler said. “Obviously, Rio Arriba County, Española, Santa Fe, all have issues associated with the lab, as does Los Alamos. When we can find common ground, I think we are a stronger force when we’re dealing with the Department of Energy and the laboratory.”

  • Regional Coalition in DC to meet with officials

    By the time the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities returns from its Washington, D.C. fact-finding trip Friday, members hope to have some answers from New Mexico’s Congressional representatives about the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Tops on its list will be to find out how much progress has been made in LANL’s transition to a new management and operations contract.
    The coalition will also seek clarity on a variety of other issues, such as Los Alamos County’s portion of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park.
    Congress approved the creation of the park last year. RCLC Executive Director Andrea Romero is hoping Congress approves funding to help strengthen communication and collaboration with the national park’s three separate parts. The park also includes sites in Hanford, Washington and Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
    “We are looking at appropriated funds for the development process and the collaboration process,” Romero said. “Cohesion between the three sites is what we’re looking for.”  
    The coalition would also like to find out more information about how the park will be ultimately funded.