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Today's News

  • Getting St. Nicholas right

    St. Nicholas is, in fact, the greatest saint in the history of Christianity. Forget Peter, Paul, or Mary; St. Nicholas has them all beat. No other saint enjoys his unique relationship to all three branches of Christianity — Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant — nor his persistent presence in secular culture.
    Archbishop Nicholas of Myra and wonder-worker of the late third and early fourth century, has been and continues to be venerated ecumenically by all the various households of the Christian faith. Although rites and customs vary, some begin their remembrance of St. Nicholas as early as Dec. 6 (his feast day on the liturgical calendar) and continue to celebrate him all through the Twelve Days of Christmas until Jan. 5.
    The mode or means of veneration can vary as well. The Orthodox and Catholic churches through hymns and litanies ask him to pray for us and recount the miracles attributed to his intercessions or direct intervention. Outside of church in Orthodox and Catholic cultures, children can usually expect gifts to be given in the name of St. Nicholas. It is in this tradition of giving that St. Nicholas persists in Protestant cultures. And it is unmistakably St. Nicholas even in the most dogmatically Protestant of countries (e.g. “Sinter Claas” in 17th century Holland).

  • Library exhibit explores Dust Bowl period

    Looking for something to do on Sunday afternoon? The Library will screen the Ken Burns film “The Dust Bowl,” free, as a lead-in to a major exhibit, which will open in early January. “Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” a national traveling exhibition about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period, will be on display at Mesa Public Library from Jan. 7 to Feb. 20.
    “Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry” will be accompanied by a series of free library programs, including lectures and film screenings. The first film screening, of the Ken Burns Film “The Dust Bowl,” will be from 12:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday in the Upstairs Meeting Rooms at Mesa Public Library.  
    The exhibition recalls a tragic period in history — the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s — and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. It raises several thought-provoking questions: What caused fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons were learned?
    Mesa Public Library is one of 25 sites throughout the United States and one of only two in New Mexico selected to present the exhibition and associated public programs in their communities.

  • Big Band sound at after-Christmas dance

    Looking for something to do in Los Alamos once Christmas is over? Why not bring a friend to a Big Band dance?
    Monday is the annual Big Band after Christmas Dance in Los Alamos.
    The dance is free open to the public, but donations are encouraged. The dance is  from 7:30-10:30 p.m. at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Proceeds from the dance will be used to help the IHM youth group.
    Music will feature the Los Alamos Big Band with featured vocalist Rene LeClair. The Los Alamos Big Band has been playing at dances throughout northern New Mexico since 1984 under the direction of Jan McDonald, who for many years was the bandleader at Los Alamos High School.  
    The band features the danceable music of the Big Band Era such as “In The Mood,” “String of Pearls,” “Sing, Sing, Sing” and “Moonlight Serenade.” They also play other danceable music such as “Moon River,” Latin numbers like “Besame Mucho” and even “Rock Around the Clock.” Several new Christmas tunes will also be featured.
    Decorations and refreshments will be provided by the IHM Youth Group.

  • Spreading holiday cheer with song

    Recently, the Los Alamos Public School choirs combined for a festive event at Los Alamos High School. The choirs performed as an elementary, middle and high school choirs and then combined as one large ensemble.
     

  • Registration for dog training classes start Monday

    Registration for the next session of dog training classes offered by the Los Alamos Dog Obedience Club (LADOC) will start Monday.
    Classes this session will include Puppy Kindergarten, Basic Manners, Agility,  Canine Good Citizen, Introduction to Scent Work, and Rally Obedience, which will begin the week of Jan. 26.
    Three new, one-session “Try It” Classes (Agility, Scent Work and Rally), and “Cujo to Compadre” (for dog-aggressive dogs) will also be offered.
    Schedule, guidelines and registration form will be available on the LADOC website (ladoc.dogbits.com) and at the LADOC building, 246 East Road. Registration is first-come, first-served, and classes often fill quickly, so timely registration is advised. Registration materials must be postmarked by Jan. 16.

  • PEEC volunteer: Ecologist strives to improve land by planning prescribed burns

    Ecologist Karla Sartor has been a board member at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center for the past three years. In October, she was the guest speaker at the Nature on Tap Series, which focused on the topic of prescribed burns.
    Sartor told PEEC in a recent interview that she chose that particular topic because with proper planning, prescribed burning can help prevent fires, protect communities, and improving watershed and forest health. “There is a huge need for more prescribed burning, and a need for more people who are qualified to do it effectively and safely,” she said. Fire is a sensitive issue in Los Alamos and planning for prescribed burns is crucial. The way a prescribed burn is considered might reduce the severity of wildfire risk in the future. The burns are helpful in preventing large, high intensity fires.
    Sartor was accompanied by Craig Martin, who from 2005 to earlier this year, was in charge of the prescribed burning for Los Alamos County and he spoke of his experience.

  • Assets in Action: Spend winter break taking it slow and easy

    Once again, it is time for my semi-annual column, for when there is some down time.
    I would like you to spend some time over the next two weeks either doing not much or doing something fun with your kids.
    I enjoy this time of year when people ask, “What plans do you have for winter break?” My answer is, “A whole lot of nothing.”
    Once you get through a little holiday hustle and bustle, spend some time chilling out, hanging around and schedule some time to do nothing together.
    Did you know the public library lets you borrow books for free? A book is a paper collection of words that…just kidding. The point is that sometimes we need to unplug and just find some solace in doing the simplistic things.
    Let your kids see you reading and encourage them to do it too.
    Purchase some cocoa and cookies, rent a movie and push back the living room furniture. Next, grab every pillow and blanket you can find and toss it into the middle. Then lay back and prepare for memories to form.
    My next idea is one for any day other than the actual celebratory days of Hanukkah, Christmas, or Kwanzaa and that is to eat dinner around the table. If you do that every day anyway, then you are asked to eat on the floor around the coffee table, perhaps while playing a board game.

  • Consider a gift of national parks

    For a last minute holiday gift, why not consider giving someone entry to all the national park areas in the country for a full year? Come by the Visitor Center at Bandelier National Park and buying an Interagency Annual Pass. 
    With this pass, the recipient can visit all the National Park Service areas all over the country (think Petroglyphs, Pecos, Grand Canyon, Everglades, Glacier, Rocky Mountain and 395 others), as well as areas under the Bureau of Land Management (Tent Rocks — Kasha Katuwe), United States Forest Service (Mount St. Helens), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Bosque del Apache or Las Vegas Wildlife Refuges). 
    In addition, the Valles Caldera National Preserve may begin honoring these passes sometime in 2015. For $80 the pass is good for a year from the month it is purchased, so one bought this December is good through the end of December 2015.  Many of the larger parks, such as Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon, charge $25 per visit, so the pass can repay its cost in just a few visits.  This year’s passes will be available while supplies last.

  • UNM sweeps its rivalry series

    The University of New Mexico Lobo men’s basketball team pulled off a sweep of its in-state rival, New Mexico State University, with a 2-point win Saturday.
    The Lobos led by 10 points at the break and held on despite a second half comeback attempt to win 69-67 at the Pan Am Center in Las Cruces.
    The Lobos won the first contest handily between the two, that coming Dec. 3 in Albuquerque.
    Deshawn Delaney again led the Lobos with 17 points and Obij Aget put in 12 for the Lobos, who won their fifth straight contest, a streak that started with the win over NMSU earlier this month.
    NMSU, which is without three starters, including star point guard Daniel Mullings, slipped to 4-8 with the loss. It did bounce back for a win Monday, but that came against Northern New Mexico, which plays in the NAIA.
    The Lobos (8-3) will play Grand Canyon tonight in Phoenix.

  • Ski Report 12-23-14

    Angel Fire

    26-inch base. 4 inches of new snow reported. 53 trails and 7 lifts open.

    Pajarito

    13-inch base. 4 inches of new snow reported. Will open when conditions permit.

    Red River

    20-inch base. 1 inch of new snow reported. 20 trails and 5 lifts open.

    Sandia Peak

    8-inch base. 2 inches of new snow reported. Will open when conditions permit.

    Sipapu

    29-inch base. 5 inches of new snow reported. 32 trails and 5 lifts open.

    Ski Apache

    25-inch base. No new snow reported. 4 trails and 3 lifts open.

    Ski Santa Fe

    41-inch base. 5 inches of new snow reported. 63 trails and 7 lifts open.

    Taos

    37-inch base. 2 inches of new snow reported. 60 trails and 14 lifts open.

    Angel Fire Nordic

    8-inch base. No new snow reported. 5 trails open.

    Chama XC

    25-inch base. No new snow reported.

    Enchanted Forest

    12-inch base. 2 inches of new snow reported. 28 trails open.

    Valles Caldera

    3-inch base. Will open when conditions permit.