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Today's News

  • Community Calendar 1-31-18

    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walk
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    February Night Sky Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty on our planetarium dome. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information atpeecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Feature Film: Black Holes at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Voyage through the galaxies in search of answers to explain the riddles of black holes! Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SUNDAY
    Cowboy Breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road, near the stables. Cost is $7 for adults, $4 for children 10 years and under. Proceeds will benefit the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse.

    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 11:45 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY

  • Garden starting class at Nature Center

    February is the perfect time to begin planting seeds indoors to extend your growing season. In a two-part class at the Los Alamos Nature Center, Natali Steinberg will teach everything you need to know to start your veggies and annuals from seed. The class meets Sundays, February 11th and March 18th, from 1:30-3:30 p.m.

    This class will teach attendees how to read a seed catalog and a seed packet, what equipment they need to start seeds indoors, how to transplant successfully into the garden, and how to start some veggies directly in the garden.

    There will be a lot of handouts and demonstrations, but no seed planting during class.

    Steinberg has taught this class for 20 years at a nursery/greenhouse in Boulder. She had a large vegetable garden on her farm, and she sold produce at the Boulder Farmers Market. Steinberg also raised and sold bedding plants.

    The cost is $50 for both sessions. Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) members can take the class for a discounted rate of $40. Advance registration is required.

    To register or learn more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Night skies, black holes at planetarium

    Paul Arendt will introduce celestial objects in the February night sky along with some recent discoveries in astronomy at 7 p.m. Friday at the Pajarito Environmental Center Planetarium. On Saturday at 2 p.m. the full-dome film “Black Holes” will play on the planetarium dome.

    During the night sky show, images of celestial objects will be projected onto the planetarium dome. “Black Holes” explores a place where time stands still, universal order breaks down and the unimaginable becomes reality.

    The Nature Center will be open regular hours in February: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; and 1-4 p.m. Sunday. The nature center is open late on Tuesdays, until 8 p.m., and closed Thursdays.
     

  • AP Night at LAHS Thursday

    Students and parents are invited to attend AP Night at Los Alamos High School from 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday in the IMC (school library).

    Attendees will be able to meet with teachers and students to learn more about specific AP and Honors course offerings at LAHS, as well as the dual credit programs offered at the high school. 

    Representatives from the University of New Mexico-LA, Northern New Mexico College and Santa Fe Community College will also be available to discuss dual credit and other college level courses.

    AP Night attendees are asked to park in the Sullivan field lot since Future Topper Night is also being held the same evening.

    All LAHS students must take an AP class, an Honors class, an online class, or a dual-credit class to fulfill a graduation requirement.  LAHS currently offers seven Honors courses, 25 AP courses, and several dual-credit classes.

    Advanced Placement Program (AP) courses are college-level courses offered in high school.  At the end of the course, students are required to take the AP exam. 

  • Getting a flu shot today can protect you, your family

    BY DR. DENISE LEONARDI
    Chief Medical Officer, United Healthcare New Mexico

    If you haven’t had a flu shot, the CDC recommends still getting vaccinated. The flu season typically peaks in February and can continue as late as May. You can help protect yourself and your family – as well as others you may contact – by getting a flu shot today.

    If you are a typically healthy person who’s had a flu shot but think you may be experiencing a common case of the flu, start by calling your primary care physician, visiting a convenience care retail clinic or urgent care clinic, or consider a virtual visit that lets you see a doctor on your mobile device or computer.

    Emergency rooms should be reserved for medical emergencies.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people who are very sick or who are at high risk of serious flu complications should be treated with antiviral drugs (such as oseltamivir, generic Tamiflu) as soon as possible if they develop flu symptoms.

    Your primary care physician can assess whether an antiviral medication is right for you.

    The greatest concern with flu is for the very young, very old, or people with co-existing medical conditions.

  • Campaign notes: Endorsements, job titles and hysteria

    “(T)he state of our state is strong – and getting stronger,” Gov. Susana Martinez claimed in the State of the State address Jan. 16.

    My assessment is that the state of the state is weak and, maybe, getting a little less weak. Candidates seeking a say in our future give quickly passing attention to fundamental problems.

    Deb Haaland, Albuquerque candidate for Congress, is fond of endorsements from people outside New Mexico. A recent endorsement is from the Congressional Black Caucus. She has 12 endorsements from individual members of Congress, says her section at medium.com. Her website is debforcongress.com.

    My confusion is my general problem with endorsements: Why I should trust these other guys, especially the non-New Mexicans and especially members of Congress? If Haaland gets to Congress, I hope she represents her district without obligations to members of Congress from other states. Haaland has a bunch of other endorsements from New Mexicans, presently and formerly in office, from people she calls “community leaders” and tribes.

  • Libertarians earn major party status in New Mexico

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico election regulators say the Libertarian Party has qualified as a major political party.
    Major-party status makes it easier for Libertarians candidates to get their name on the ballot. Secretary of State’s Office spokesman Joey Keefe said Monday that Libertarian candidates need just 230 petition signatures to run statewide. A Democrat will need 2,507 based on prior election turnout.

    Attorney A. Blair Dunn is running as a Libertarian for the Senate seat held by Democrat Martin Heinrich, and business consultant Lloyd Princeton is seeking the Albuquerque-based congressional seat under the Libertarian banner.

    State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn recently switched his party affiliation to Libertarian from Republican. Auber Dunn is Blair Dunn’s father.

    Libertarians got major party status with a strong showing in 2016 presidential elections and adequate registration numbers.

  • Grants spur growth, investments in Pueblo businesses

    SUBMITTED TO THE MONITOR

    A record nine northern New Mexico Native American – owned and – operated businesses have received a total of more than $50,000 in the 2018 grants from the Native American Venture Acceleration Fund.

    The fund was created by Los Alamos National Laboratory operator Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) and the Regional Development Corporation (RDC) to help the recipients create jobs, increase their revenue base and diversify the area economy.

    “These investments create jobs for pueblo-owned businesses and help strengthen the area’s economy,” said Kathy Keith, director of the Community Partnerships Office at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    To date, more than $330,000 has been invested in the regional economy through the Native American Venture Acceleration Fund. The investment comes from LANS, and the fund is managed by the Regional Development Corporation, as part of its work assisting Northern New Mexico communities and small businesses with economic development activities, furthering job creation in the region.

    This year’s recipients are:

    • Cochiti Pueblo Development Corporation, Cochiti Pueblo: to purchase a water metering and billing system for a water conservation program with tiered billing that will save water and increase revenues.

  • Experts warn of risk of sinkhole in popular New Mexico area

    By SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN, Associated Press

    Experts are painting a dire picture about the impending collapse of a giant cavern under a highway interchange that serves as a gateway to two national parks and the heart of New Mexico's oil and gas country.

    They told lawmakers Tuesday during a legislative meeting that new cracks are developing at the site on the edge of the city of Carlsbad, indicating that things are beginning to move underground.

    "It is happening right now. It is happening in slow motion," said George Veni, executive director of the National Cave and Karst Research Institute and a member of a group that has been working on possible solutions.

    Lawmakers are seeking more than $40 million in state funding to prevent a massive sinkhole, which could take with it the busy intersection, including a highway that leads to Carlsbad Caverns National Park and Guadalupe Mountains National Park, just across the state line in Texas. Nearby, there's also a church, trailer park, businesses and an irrigation canal that provides water for more than 30 square miles of agricultural lands.

  • Can 3 business titans cure the US health care system?

    By MARLEY JAY, AP Markets Writer

    NEW YORK (AP) — Can a legendary investor, the king of on-line retail and a Wall Street financier find a cure for what ails America's health care system?

    The trio of Warren Buffett, Jeff Bezos and Jamie Dimon have had enough success in their respective industries that they are at least being given the benefit of the doubt.

    They have announced they're forming a new company to address health care costs for their U.S. employees, and possibly for many more Americans. The news was enough to rattle investors in established health insurers and trigger a sell-off in their stocks.

    Their announcement Tuesday didn't include many specifics, but based on their very different business backgrounds it's possible to see what each of the three business titans might contribute toward tackling the health care problem.

    For starters, they're heads of huge operations: Their three companies — Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway, Bezo's Amazon.com and Dimon's JPMorgan Chase — have a combined market worth of $1.62 trillion.