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Today's News

  • Edwards receives award for security work

    Dena Edwards, a security professional in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate for Mission Assurance, Security and Emergency Response, was named Outstanding Contractor Security Professional of the Year by the Department of Energy.
    “Dena is a true professional who has made a visible and valuable positive difference in our laboratory and our community,” said Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan.
    Edwards was selected for spearheading the lab’s Active Shooter and Work Place Violence Awareness Program. She provided training and exercise support to various organizations to ensure all employees know what they need to protect themselves and their co-workers.
    Her work was recognized throughout the DOE enterprise and she was a key subject matter expert, providing expertise to other DOE facilities to improve their workplace violence programs.
    Edwards is also the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Security Contractor Professional of the Year.
    This is the fifth year in a row and the sixth time in seven years that the laboratory has won the NNSA award.

  • LIGO observations confirm theory on heavy elements

    Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on August 25 when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.
    The event appeared to be a merger of two neutron stars — a specialty for the Los Alamos National Laboratory team of astrophysicists that Fryer leads. As the distant cosmic cataclysm unfolded, fresh observational data was pouring in from the observation — only the fifth published since the observatory began operating almost two years ago.
    “As soon as I heard the news, I knew that understanding all of the implications would require input from a broad, multi-disciplinary set of scientists,” said Fryer, who leads Los Alamos’ Center for Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Fryer’s colleagues, Ryan Wollaeger and Oleg Korobkin, outlined a series of radiation transport calculations and were given priority on Los Alamos’ supercomputers to run them. “Within a few hours, we were up and running.”
    They soon discovered the LIGO data showed more ejected mass from the merger than the simulations accounted for.

  • Lab awards 2017 Fellows Prizes

    Five Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have been awarded the laboratory’s prestigious Fellows Prize in the areas of science or engineering research and leadership.
    Among those awarded are Eric Flynn, Harshini Mukundan and Nikolai Sinitsyn were awarded the Fellows’ Prize for Outstanding Research, and Brian Albright and Tess Light were awarded the Fellows Prize for Outstanding Leadership.
    “These scientists demonstrate the breadth of scientific research and leadership supporting the Laboratory’s national security mission and benefiting society,” said Alan Bishop, principal associate director for Science, Technology and Engineering. “Their innovative scientific discoveries and leadership represent the highest level of excellence. I congratulate all of them on their achievements.”
    The Fellows Research Prize for science or engineering commends individuals for outstanding research performed at the Laboratory and published within the last 10 years and that has had a significant impact on its discipline or program. The Fellows Leadership Prize commends individuals for outstanding scientific and engineering leadership at the laboratory and recognizes the value of such leadership that stimulates the interest of talented young staff members in the development of new technology.

  • United Church names new Christian Ministries Director

    The United Church of Los Alamos recently hired Kara Windler as its Director of Christian Ministries (DCE).
    Windler began her relationship with the United Church in 2012 when her and husband Ken arrived in Los Alamos.
    “A good friend of mine from college grew up in the United Church so, of course, I had to check it out when I moved to Los Alamos,” said Windler. “What kept me coming back was the church’s ecumenical spirit and people’s willingness to dive deep into questions of faith.”
    Prior to becoming a member of the church staff, Windler attended their Women’s Book Study, and their Morning Bible Study.
    She found the staff very supportive and enjoyed their interest in always doing what is best for the community.
    Kara has also worked with the Ministerial Alliance, is part of the Los Alamos Police and Fire Department Chaplain’s Corps, providing pastoral care during times of crisis. She has also worked with Los Alamos Medical Center and Los Alamos Visiting Nurses as a Chaplain and has served as the Associate for Liturgy and Pulpit Supply at the White Rock Presbyterian Church.
    Those interested can learn more about the United Church of Los Alamos by visiting their website at unitedchurchla.org.

  • Birth Announcements 10-22-17

    Here are the recent births at Los Alamos Medical Center:

    Oct. 12: A boy, Felix Henrik Szymanski Blom, was born to Sarah Szymanski-Blom and Philip Blom.

    Oct. 17: A boy, Ramon Santiago Hidalgo, was born to M. Adrienne and Santiago Sena.

    Oct. 18: A boy, Viraj Yadav, was born to Sukriti Yadav and Anil Kumar.

  • News for Retirees 10-22-17

    Oct. 23-28
    Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    9 a.m. Pilates
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Green chile
    chicken tortilla soup
    6 p.m. Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m. Ballroom Dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m. Variety Training
    10 a.m. Low Vision/Hearing Group
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Catfish
    1 p.m. Party Bridge
    1:30 p.m. “Friends” Meeting
    7:30 p.m. Table Tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m. LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio Plus
    10:30 a.m. Music w/Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge

    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Ad Hoc Hikers
    8:45 a.m. Variety Training
    9:30 a.m. Posture Mat Class
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Pasta Primavera
    12:30 p.m. Short Play: “Final Gift”
    1:30 p.m. Beginning Tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom Dancing
    7 p.m. Bridge

  • Pet Talk: Keeping your horses safe from EIA

    Horses are beautiful and strong creatures, but they still depend on their owners to keep them healthy.
    One disease horse owners should be aware of is Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), a virus that can destroy red blood cells, causing weakness, anemia, and death.
    Michelle Coleman, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how the disease is spread.
    “EIA is an infectious viral disease,” Coleman said. “The most common mode of transmission of EIA is by the transfer of virus-infected blood-feeding insects, such as horse flies. It can also be transmitted through the use of blood-contaminated syringes, surgical equipment, or the transfusion of infected blood or blood products. Although uncommon, transmission can also occur through the placenta in infected mares.”
     There is no treatment, or safe and effective vaccine, available for this disease, so horses that are positive for EIA should be isolated from other horses.
    Most horses infected with EIA also do not show any signs of illness or disease, so it is important to constantly maintain good hygiene and disinfection principles, such as controlling insects in the horse’s environment. 

  • Pet of the Week 10-22-17

    In the cat world, this week’s pet is known as a team player.
    Mando, a year-old Siamese with crème and seal point highlights, will be there when you start your next project or putting the finishing touches on your last one. He loves to know what is going on around him.
    According to the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, where he currently resides, he also has some tricks up his furry sleeve. Apparently he rolls over on command – or he often does, because he’s still a cat.
    He checks all the positive boxes: good with kids, housebroken, and he’s indoor only. He doesn’t seem to mind dogs – perhaps he appreciates them for their entertainment value – and he likes other cats.
    His blue eyes are hypnotic and usually upon you. He’s adorable and attentive. Available for recruitment, so sign him up.
    Please contact the County Animal Shelter 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • Democracy, money at stake for the state in 2020 census

    Note: This column was first published in the New Mexico Political Report, which can be found at NMPoliticalReport.com.

    Pop quiz.
    Which of the following statements are true?

    -The census is constitutionally required in order to count every person in the U.S.
    -The census determines how much federal money—more than $6 billion—flows into New Mexico’s economy every year.
    -New Mexicans are more at risk of not being counted by the census than are people in most every other state.
    -The census is in jeopardy—and that puts New Mexicans in jeopardy.

  • Political, market solutions needed to fix health care

    Martin Hickey has been around the quadrangle in healthcare, working in public institutions (Indian Health Service and the VA) and private.
    He’s best known here as former CEO of Lovelace Health Systems, although he worked outside the state for three other companies.
    Now he runs New Mexico Health Connections, a nonprofit health insurance cooperative founded in response to the Affordable Care Act.
    In a talk before New Mexico Press Women last week, Hickey was frank about doctors, hospitals, and the healthcare system.
    “Money has rained down on top of it,” he said, referring to healthcare, and yet outcomes are worse than cheaper systems in other industrial nations. We don’t have real competition between doctors or hospitals, and hospitals are money machines.
    A physician, Hickey said he took his last exam in 1981, but he can still hang out a shingle anywhere. You may like your doctor, but you really don’t know how skilled he or she is because they’re never measured.
    Some healthcare organizations have gotten better at measuring doctors, but the only people who know the results are other doctors, so “you have physicians working with other physicians, and most of the high-cost doctors will get better or leave.” Still, he thinks all doctors should undergo a yearly simulator test.