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Today's News

  • County sells another piece of A-19

    County Council approved selling another piece of A-19 land in White Rock to a real estate developer in hopes of getting the long-stalled project off the ground.

    The decision to sell the land was made during council’s regular meeting July 11.

    The development at A-19 has been plagued by delays. Contractors walked off the job in May 2016 after a thick layer of basalt was discovered beneath the site.

    The county negotiated a deal in June, agreeing to pay the developer, the A-19-A-1 Acquisition Group, $2 million to break up the basalt and install utilities.

    Council agreed July 11 to sell 12.76 acres in the northern section for $460,000 to the A-19-A-1 Acquisition group. The parcel is on the north side of NM State Road 4, between the intersections of Sherwood Boulevard and New Mexico State Road 4.

    The county has been working with the A-19-A-1 group to build housing in that area in anticipation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s recent announcement to hire thousands of workers to fill an upcoming retirement gap. The homes are expected to cost between $300,000 and $400,000.

  • Community has many activities for kids

    I hope you won’t mind one more column on our adventures to praise the great people in our community.
    Kudos Piñon Park Pool, a free community swim, friendly staff free pool toys to borrow.

    Next was the first lemonade stand for three little girls when LAPD Officer Gallegos stopped by for a visit. While the girls were elated to have a man in blue because lemonade was free for firemen and police officers, he wanted to pay.

    He proceeded to give the girls free stickers and asked them to display them proudly just if any fire fighters did stop too.

    The next event with Kiwanis at PEEC had free smores, campfire stories and songs. Joy brought the excitement as the head campfire girl with her lovely daughter standing outside with their mouths open wide and belting out songs about lemon drops and gum drops.

    Our next creator of fun is Mesa Public Librarian Angelina Manfredi. While I would love to write an entire article just about

    Angie, I’m forced to highlight her goodness in just a paragraph or two.

    Manfredi and her Women of White Rock (WOW) held an event that we stumbled upon, a stuffed animal sleep over at the library!

  • Making manufacturers: Events aim to inspire next-generation workers

    By Sandy Nelson
    For Finance New Mexico

    Young people can be hard to impress, but students from Albuquerque’s Academy of Trades and Technology (ATTHS) charter school were visibly stoked by a tour of Rader Awning during 2016 Manufacturing Day events.

    Before-and-after shots of the 15 ATTHS students who visited the factory where Rader manufactures awnings, shade panels and fabric products illustrate what can happen when young adults get a close look at the world of manufacturing: a transformation from bored detachment to delighted engagement.

    It’s the kind of transformation that inspires New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership (NM MEP), the organizers and sponsors of local Manufacturing Day, to focus on introducing a fresh generation to careers in advanced manufacturing.

    Closing the gap

  • Fake Indian jewelry by the thousands threaten New Mexico artisans

    Last summer, at the Santo Domingo Pueblo arts and crafts fair, I bought a carved wooden bear from a seller who said he was from Jemez Pueblo. He was sitting with fetish carvers from Zuni Pueblo. Imagine my surprise when I saw a shelf full of the same carved bears across the border in Mexico.

    Recently, U. S. Sen. Tom Udall held field hearings on the issue of counterfeit Native American art. His goal was to hear from artists, experts and law enforcement officials about changes needed in the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 to better protect both artists and buyers.

    This is not a trivial problem. In the past year, we’ve seen multiple indictments stemming from a federal investigation.

    The quantity of fake Indian jewelry pouring in from Asia is truly staggering. It’s risen to a level (one number used in the hearing was 80 percent ) that will kill our jewelry industry if we let it.

    I was surprised to learn some years ago that New Mexico’s jewelry industry is the fifth or sixth largest in the country.

  • Mayer on changing his live shows: 'I want to be competitive'

    NEW YORK (AP) — John Mayer never relied on multicolored lighting, confetti and pyrotechnics to help him during his live shows, like some of his peers.

    But the singer-songwriter-guitarist wanted to step up his game, and he said watching Drake perform live encouraged him to beef up his stage production and take more risks during his concerts.

    Mayer will launch the second leg of his Search for Everything World Tour on Tuesday in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The new live shows have been a departure for the Grammy winner, who now performs with a colorful and futuristic L.E.D. wall and floor.

    "I wanted to have a really big show. I want to be competitive. I want to be in the world where people are creating bigger and better shows," Mayer said. "I think there's a healthy competition involved in it. I went and saw Drake's show and ... real artists say, 'Wow!' And then they go, '(Expletive).' Right? Because you see something that wows you and as an artist yourself you go, 'I want a little of that.'"

    The 39-year-old recently wrapped a tour with Dead & Company, his supergroup with Grateful Dead's Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann and Bob Weir. His summer tour wraps Sept. 3 in Noblesville, Indiana.

  • New Mexico land commissioner announces run for Congress

    SANTA FE (AP) — Republican New Mexico Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn announced Tuesday he would run for the state's southern congressional seat instead of seeking a second term in state office.
    Dunn hopes to succeed U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce, who is running for governor in 2018. The governor's race has set off a game of musical chairs in New Mexico politics as Pearce and Democratic U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham of Albuquerque decline to seek re-election to Congress.
    Dunn was elected in 2014 to lead an agency that oversees state trust lands spanning 14,000 square miles (36,000 square kilometers) that help fund schools, universities, hospitals and other public institutions.
    Two Democrats already are vying aggressively for Dunn's current job: former land commissioner Ray Powell and political newcomer Garrett VeneKlasen.
    Dunn, a retired banking executive and active rancher at property near Corona, said he wants stimulate more private-sector job opportunities in New Mexico. He denounced continued gridlock on Capitol Hill under Republican leadership and emphasized the need to improve the U.S. health care system and devote more resources to security at the U.S. border with Mexico.

  • Perry touts energy exports, awaits study on electric grid

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is pushing for increased exports of natural gas and other energy sources as it seeks U.S. "energy dominance" in the global market, Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Tuesday.

    He and President Donald Trump have offered a "comforting" message to energy companies seeking to export liquefied natural gas, or LNG at huge terminals in Texas, Louisiana and other states, Perry said: "If you meet the rules, here's your permit."

    Perry also said he has not seen a widely expected department study into the reliability of the electric grid. A draft version leaked to news outlets indicates that renewable power and federal regulations have had little impact on reliability.

    "There are lots of people breathlessly waiting to read that" report, Perry said — and he is among them.
    In a speech at the National Press Club, Perry called LNG exports a "major driver" of jobs and energy production and a key way to reduce global emissions of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

    "We can have a cleaner environment and a strong, prosperous nation," Perry said. "We do not need to sacrifice one for the other; nor will we follow the course other allies have taken to their detriment."

  • New Mexico rebuilds financial reserves after budget crisis

    SANTA FE (AP) — A top finance official says New Mexico state government has a bigger financial cushion than anticipated.
    Finance and Administration Deputy Secretary Stephanie Schardin Clarke told a panel of lawmakers Monday that the state entered the fiscal year on July 1 with reserves equal to 5.3 percent of annual spending obligations, and expects to maintain a 3 percent cushion at the end the current fiscal year in June 2018.
    Estimates based on earlier revenue forecasts had the state nearly running out of cash by mid-2018, threatening the New Mexico's credit rating and its access to low borrowing costs on infrastructure projects.
    To shore up shaky state finances, the Democratic-led Legislature and Republican Gov. Susana Martinez agreed in May to tap into borrowed money from suspended infrastructure projects.
     

  • New Mexico professor seeks to save moon-landing sites

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — A New Mexico State University anthropology professor is on a mission to save moon-landing sites.
    Beth O'Leary is speaking this week in Washington, D.C., on preserving the spots where humans stepped on the surface of the moon.
    She is giving presentations at the National Geographic Society and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum to coincide with the 48th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission.
    Her new book, "The Final Mission: Preserving NASA's Apollo Sites," looks at the exploration of space from an archaeological and historical-preservation perspective. It also details how various sites in New Mexico, Texas, California, and Florida contributed to the successful Apollo mission.
    O'Leary says the Apollo 11 landing site at Tranquility Base, where humans stepped foot on the moon, should be named a National Historic landmark.
     

  • Police Beat 7-16-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    July 4
    11:21 p.m. — Garrett Eckhart, 36, of Los Alamos was arrested for disorderly conduct, resisting or evading an officer and battery upon a peace officer.

    11:29 p.m. — LAPD arrested an individual for driving while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.

    July 5
    1:39 a.m. — Phillip Swazo, 28, of Santa Fe was arrested for driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor and/or drugs, open container and failure to display a valid registration plate.

    3:34 a.m. — Sherry Lynn Francisco, 57, of Harper, Texas was arrested for driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor and/or drugs.

    5:35 a.m. — Los Alamos Police reported found property.

    10 a.m. — LAPD cited an individual on Kwage Mesa Trail for an animal at large.

    1:54 p.m. — Los Alamos Police reported a license plate was removed from a parked vehicle.