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Today's News

  • Breaking: Bank robbery in White Rock; suspects at large

    Update: Police search for one suspect in White Rock bank robbery

    The search for a suspect continues following an armed robbery at the Los Alamos National Bank in White Rock about noon today. 

    The case has been turned over to the Federal Bureau of Investigations out of Albuquerque. Los Alamos Police Department has confirmed earlier today that officers were searching for one suspect following the bank robbery. The suspect is secribed as having a hand gun, being a caucasian male and wearing a black "hoodie" with a "DC" on the hood and a bandana.

    Anyone with information about the suspect is asked to call the FBI at 505-889-1300.

    Police have reported to school officials that shots were fired. Two schools in White Rock, Chamisa and Pinon elementary schools were on lock out after the robbery.

    "We’re on a hightened alert, shades are closed and nobody goes in or out. Our request is that nobody go to the school right now," said Los Alamos Public Schools superintendent Kurt Steinhaus.

    The school district has contacted every early childhood day care center in White Rock, Steinhaus said.

    Steinhaus said the schools are working with the Los Alamos Police Department and all LAPS students will be released today at their usual time. 

  • Atomic City Update: Ski season is finally here

    I have good news for all the outdoor enthusiasts in the community: Ski season is officially here. After months of warm temperatures, the lifts at the local ski resorts are open, or will open in the coming weeks.

    This weekend, for the 15th year in a row, Sipapu Ski Resort will be the first ski area in the state to open.

    “Thanks to our hardworking and dedicated mountain team, Sipapu is once again the first resort to open for the season in New Mexico,” said John Paul Bradley, Sipapu’s mountain manager.  “We’ve been watching the weather and taking advantage of favorable temperatures to continue making snow, staying up at all hours to make snow when the opportunities arose.”

    Though the Pajarito Ski Area was originally set to open for the season next Friday, the opening has been pushed back to Dec. 16 because of unseasonably warm weather for this time of year.

    From now until April, the slopes will be full of people, both young and old.

    People in this area truly are fortunate to have so many outdoor opportunities available to them. In addition to the ski resorts in the immediate area, there are many places within driving distance that offer unbelievable slopes as well, ensuring that nobody will get bored of the slopes all season long.

  • Hilltopper boys basketball set up for success

    One of the hardest things to do in basketball is build a team with great chemistry, one filled with players willing to look past their own stats to help the group win.

    With a team brimming with seniors, and plenty of experience, that is the goal for the Los Alamos High School boys’ basketball team. For the vast majority of the group, this is the last chance to leave a legacy. The time to win is now.

    As head coach Michael Kluk looks at his team, he sees experience as the biggest thing working in the team’s favor.

    There are eight seniors on the roster, including most of the leading scorers from last year’s team that earned the No. 14 seed in the state championship tournament.

    “We are certainly more experienced than last year, and hopefully a little bit more mature,” Kluk said. “Hopefully that will turn into some success.”

    Many of the seniors expected to play big roles this year got valuable experience a year ago. Four of the seniors, Antonio Trujillo, Michael Naranjo, Ramon Roybal and Jack Stewart, all averaged more than six points per game a year ago.

    Trujillo, the team’s likely starting point guard, led the team with 8.6 points per game, and dished out the most assists with three per game.

  • Democrats mandate harassment training

     
    SANTA FE (AP) — The Democratic Party of New Mexico says its political candidates will need to complete sexual harassment prevention training to receive campaign support from the party in 2018 elections.

    State Democratic Party Chairman Richard Ellenberg on Monday announced the training requirement in response to decade-old allegations of harassment of women filed against state Sen. Michael Padilla and incidents beyond New Mexico.

    Padilla denies the prior accusations and is resisting calls to end his campaign for lieutenant governor by gubernatorial candidates including U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham.

    Ellenberg said training will cover situations of sexual violence, harassment, bullying and differential treatment of men and women. He says candidates who do not complete training will be denied access to the party's voter database as well as communications support.

  • No plea deal for child exploitation suspect

    SANTA FE — An attorney for a man accused of getting a 15-year-old Los Alamos girl to send him lurid photographs of herself and receive some from him, in exchange for a Netflix login, said negotiations for a plea deal haven’t worked out.

    Greg Camp, attorney for Tyson Collins, 24, of Washington, told State District Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer that plea discussions, scheduled to be heard on Thursday in her court, weren’t complete.

    Marlowe Sommer set dates for trial and other matters in to early 2018 in Los Alamos.

    Collins is accused of answering a request from the teen on an app called Whispers when she asked for access to a Netflix account, and then asking her for semi-nude and nude pictures of herself – and ultimately sending her a nude photo of his genitals.

    The exchanges in June resulted in Collins arrest.

    He was charged with one third-degree felony of causing or permitting a child to engage in sexual exploitation and three fourth-degree felonies of solicitation of child, criminal sexual communications with a child and contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

  • Jail Report 11-19-17

    Lisa Chavez, 32, of Española, was booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center on Nov. 8 on a warrant issued by the Los Alamos Municipal Court. With a $250 bond amount, she was released.

    Christina M. Martinez, 37, of Santa Cruz, was arrested on suspicion of operating a vehicle under the influence of intoxicating liquors or substances on Nov. 8 and booked into the detention center. She was later released.

    Kelly Darlene Snow, 49, of Los Alamos, was arrested on a state district court bench warrant at the request of Adult Probation and Parole on Nov. 8. She remained in jail as of Nov. 14.

    Antonio H. Lopez
    , 41, of Santa Fe, was arrested on Nov. 12 on a district court warrant served by Santa Fe County Sheriff’s office in Santa Fe and booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center. As of Nov. 14, he remained in jail.

    Joseph Suazo, 51, of Grants, was arrested in Los Angeles, Calif., on Nov. 12, on a district court warrant served by the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office. As of Nov. 14, he remained in jail.

  • Police Beat 11-19-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department records.
    Charges or citations listed in the Police Beat do not imply guilt or non-guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons or issued a citation.

    Nov. 12
    3:51 p.m. – Police responded to a report of a suicide attempt.

    Nov. 13
    8:23 a.m. – The bomb squad was called to investigate a suspicious backpack found in a trashcan.
    3:52 p.m. – Smith’s Marketplace reported a case of shoplifting to the police.

    Nov. 14
    7:12 a.m. – Police took a report of graffiti.
    1:57 p.m. – Someone reported that a restraining order had been violated.
    3:23 p.m. – Police investigated two reports of criminal damage to vehicles at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church.

  • MOWW set to meet Tuesday

    This month’s meeting of the Military of World Wars Chapter 229 will be on Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the second floor conference room in the Los Alamos Research Park located west of the South Mesa Fire Station.
    The speaker will be Commander Brian Gauck, the new commander of the Los Alamos High School NJROTC unit. He will provide an overview of his research on friendships formed by USAFA graduates.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The Hot Rocks Java Café staff will be catering the dinner: Pot Roast and appropriate side dishes. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. A dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP (yes or no) for the dinner is needed by today.
    Call LTC Gregg Giesler, USA Retired, chapter commander, at 662-5574, or email him at g.gieslercomputer.org), or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750, or email her at depinyan@cybermesa.com).

  • Cancer can occur in pets

    Many of us know someone whose life has been impacted by cancer. Unfortunately, cancer can also occur in our pets. As part of Pet Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles, associate professor, and Dr. Brandan Wustefeld-Janssens, a fellowship-trained surgical oncologist at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, discussed everything owners need to know about cancer in pets.

    One of the most common types of cancer in pets is skin cancer, Wustefeld-Janssens said. Primary care veterinarians can usually treat cancerous skin tumors without referring the pet to specialty care. However, more serious types of cancer—including tumors that appear in the bone, mouth, glands (such as anal sacs), or lymph nodes—may require surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy.

    In some situations, Wilson-Robles said a combination of treatments may be necessary to prevent the cancer from relapsing. For example, an animal may undergo surgery to remove a cancerous tumor, but that doesn’t mean the animal is free of cancer cells. The animal may still need chemotherapy to remove remaining cancer cells from the body, which can help prevent the cancer from developing again.

  • Pet of the Week 11-19-17

    Wilbur can teach humans a thing or two about optimism and having an indomitable spirit. Wilbur, a 6-year-old Boston Terrier mix, was a stray living on the streets of Albuquerque was hit by a car Oct. 12.

    Wilbur lost an eye in the accident and his tail is forever crooked, but thanks to eye surgery funded by the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter Allies, Wilbur is back to his old self.

    He’s 23 pounds, and has a tan-and-black coat. He arrived at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter Nov. 7, and loves to greet every person that comes through the door with a wagging tail and a leash-tugging enthusiasm that makes everyone want to pet him and call him a good boy.

    Though he’s been through a lot, Wilbur now has a clean bill of health and needs no further medication. Volunteers say he loves all types of people, including kids. Though he loves to be the center of attention, Wilbur also does well with other dogs and cats and doesn’t mind sharing the spotlight.

    He also has a thing for squeaky toys, walks and hikes. Wilbur is also crate-trained and sterilized. He has also been vaccinated and has a microchip.