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Today's News

  • Culture clash becoming more muddled

    The three-culture definition of New Mexico might be the wrong conversation.
    Whoa! you say. Don’t go there. That’s an even bigger and more dangerous Box of Pandoras than seeking extensive revision of the state Constitution.
    Well, true. But things change. Even the Constitution has a new bone of contention—what it says or doesn’t say about marriage. Some people care about that bone, while few care that the Constitution blocks unifying our university system.
    So put the rocks away and hear me out.
    A small but interesting example comes with the Spanish Market art event in Santa Fe. The market is mutating, I read. The senior event is the 62nd “Traditional Spanish Market.” It occupies the plaza. Around the corner is the 27-year-old “Contemporary Hispanic Market.” Somewhere within all this is a sensible sounding category called “Innovations Within Traditions.”
    Within Hispanic New Mexico, two cultures exist: One, of the traditional northern villages, and the other, well, “Mexican,” for lack of a better word. The two are different. The majority trace to Mexico. I haven’t had the differences explained, but I trust my sources who also say that sometimes bad behavior exists between the two sets of folks.

  • Borrowing trouble at Martinez shop

    Confusion and suspicion is about all the administration of Gov. Susana Martinez has managed to accomplish by refusing public access to a controversial audit of New Mexico behavioral health providers it paid to have conducted by a Boston-based firm.
    As a consequence of that audit, which reportedly alleges that the state was overcharged by some $36 million, fully 15 behavioral health organizations under contract to the state to provide Medicaid-funded services to eligible New Mexicans were sent packing.
    Reports have it that at least one and perhaps as many as three of those providers have subsequently been reinstated, but the bulk of the behavioral health services under Medicaid in New Mexico are now being contracted out to providers in Arizona.
    The whole affair has prompted outrage from the health providers cut loose, the clients being served and their families and not a few state lawmakers.
    All because no one has seen the audit, aside from Martinez, her Human Services Department functionaries, and the state Attorney General, who has inexplicably OK’d suppression of the audit.
    Remarkably, at this writing, not even state Auditor Hector Balderas had been granted access to the documents.

  • Isotopes shut out at Fresno

    The road has been plenty bumpy for the Albuquerque Isotopes.
    The Isotopes dropped their sixth straight contest in seven outings on their California road trip Monday. The Isotopes were shut out by the Fresno Grizzlies 2-0 in Fresno.
    This disastrous trip for Albuquerque will come to an end tonight when it finishes off the series against Fresno.
    Albuquerque returns home to the friendly confines of Isotopes Park Thursday for the start of an eight-game homestand.
    The six-game skid dropped Albuquerque (63-54) four games off the pace for the PCL American Southern division lead. Oklahoma City (67-50) is on top of the standings and Round Rock (62-55) is just a game behind the Isotopes.
    On this trip, the Isotopes have not scored more than two runs in any game, including Monday night’s shutout and a 2-1 loss Sunday night to the Grizzlies. Red Patterson was the hard-luck loser Monday, giving up just one earned run and three hits in 5-2/3 innings.
    Patterson (6-4) didn’t get much offensive support, save lead-off batter Matt Angle.
    Angle went 3-for-3 with a double, but the next four spots in the Albuquerque batting order went a combined 1-for-14 in the game.

  • NMSU eyes beer sales at Pan Am

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — New Mexico State University President Garrey Carruthers is voicing support for the possibility of selling beer and wine during sports events at the Las Cruces school’s Pan American Center.
    According to the Las Cruces Sun-News, the possibility is expected to be up for discussion this fall.
    Carruthers says selling beer and wine at the center would be a good revenue-maker for NMSU and shouldn’t have a downside if handled appropriately.
    On the other hand, Carruthers said he’d oppose alcohol sales at Aggie Memorial Stadium. He says that’s because the university would be liable if people who drink while tailgating before the game purchase a single drink inside the stadium.
    The Pan American Center is the venue for NMSU home basketball and volleyball games as well as special events.

  • A-Rod may be finished already

    NEW YORK (AP) — Alex Rodriguez is allowed to play. Now we’ll find out if he can anymore.
    Coming off his second hip surgery in four years, the 38-year-old third baseman finally made his season debut Monday night for the New York Yankees — hours after he was suspended through 2014 by Major League Baseball as part of the Biogenesis drug investigation.
    The embattled slugger promised to appeal his penalty, which probably keeps him in pinstripes for the rest of this year. After that, who knows if he’ll ever take the field again?
    So he’s not banned yet, but maybe he’s all but finished. At least as A-Rod the All-Star.
    “I just hope that there’s a happy ending there somewhere,” he said.
    Time will tell.
    Time, and a steady dose of big league pitching. Time, and the daily grind of a major league schedule. Time, and the way his broken-down body rebounds after sliding into second or diving for a grounder.
    Four months on the sidelines is a long stretch for any player, especially one so late in his career. Not to mention, Rodriguez wasn’t exactly tearing it up before his latest injury.
    He went 3 for 25 (.120) without an RBI in the 2012 playoffs and wound up getting benched. Against right-handers, he was 0 for 18 with 12 strikeouts.

  • Kim tops Croney in finals of women's LATC tourney

    Despite having a year’s hiatus, Jeena Kim successfully defended her Los Alamos Tennis Club women’s title.
    The LATC held its annual championship tournament July 26-27 at Urban Park, with approximately 40 players participating.
    Kim won the 2011 LATC women’s championship draw, but because of low participation numbers in 2012, there was no women’s flight. But this year, Kim got a crack at defending her title and did just that by defeating Debi Croney in the final, winning in straight sets, 6-2, 6-1.
    In the men’s top singles flight, John Park, a former LATC champion, returned to title form, topping Bob Tonelli 6-1, 6-1 to earn that crown.
    The team of Gilbert Ratliff/John Charles earned a victory in the men’s A doubles draw, topping Forrest White/George Margevicius, 6-4, 6-3, while sisters Gillian Hsieh-Ratliff/Sidra Hsieh-Ratliff came back from a set down to top Joel Williams/Gordon Medford in the B doubles draw, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.
    In one of the closest matches of the tournament, the finals of the mixed A doubles competition, Ryan Maupin/Sidra Hsieh-Ratliff outlasted Chad Bustard/Gillian Hsieh-Ratliff 7-5, 4-6, 6-4.
    Other winners included Tom Kelley/Marlene Kelley in mixed B doubles and Peter Greene in the men’s over-50 singles draw.

  • Football Opening Day

    Monday was the first official day of preseason workouts for the Los Alamos Hilltopper football team, as well as the other teams around the state. The Hilltoppers will open up their 2013 season Aug. 30 when they travel to Pojoaque Valley. Los Alamos finished 6-4 last season and was second in the District 2-4A race behind Santa Fe. 

  • Raw: Calif. Fire Threatening Hundreds of Homes

    A fast-growing wildfire has forced hundreds of homes to evacuate near Lake Elsinore. The fire started in Southern California's Cleveland National Forest.

  • Flash Flood Watch continues until 4 a.m. Thursday

    THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT...

    THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

    * A PORTION OF NORTH AND CENTRAL NEW MEXICO... INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS... EAST SLOPES SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS... FAR NORTHEAST HIGHLANDS... FAR NORTHWEST HIGHLANDS... HARDING COUNTY... JEMEZ MOUNTAINS... LOWER CHAMA RIVER VALLEY... NORTHERN SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS ABOVE 9500 FEET/RED RIVER... NORTHWEST HIGHLANDS... NORTHWEST PLATEAU... RATON RIDGE/JOHNSON MESA... SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS... SOUTHERN SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS ABOVE 9500 FEET... UNION COUNTY... UPPER RIO GRANDE VALLEY AND WEST SLOPES SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS.

    * THROUGH LATE TONIGHT

    * AN UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE TROUGH WILL MOVE ACROSS WEST AND CENTRAL NEW MEXICO THROUGH THIS EVENING... ACTING ON CONSIDERABLE ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE TO PRODUCE NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS... SOME WITH HEAVY RAINFALL. A SURFACE FRONT ACROSS NORTHEAST NEW MEXICO WILL PROVIDE AN ADDITIONAL FOCUS FOR THUNDERSTORMS WHICH MAY MOVE OVER THE SAME AREA... AMPLIFYING THE FLOODING THREAT. THE STRONGEST STORMS WILL BE CAPABLE OF RAINFALL RATES EXCEEDING AN INCH AND A HALF AN HOUR.

  • State Dept. orders evacuation of embassy in Yemen

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department on Tuesday ordered the U.S. Embassy in Yemen evacuated as a result of the threat by al-Qaida that has triggered temporary shutdowns of 19 American diplomatic posts across the Middle East and Africa.

    The department said in a travel warning that it had ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government personnel from Yemen "due to the continued potential for terrorist attacks" and said U.S. citizens in Yemen should leave immediately because of an "extremely high" security threat level.

    "U.S. citizens currently in Yemen should depart. As staff levels at the Embassy are restricted, our ability to assist U.S. citizens in an emergency and provide routine consular services remains limited and may be further constrained by the fluid security situation," the travel warning said.

    The U.S. Embassy is located in Sanaa, the capital of Yemen.