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Today's News

  • Local flavor

    Local flavor

     

    • The Los Alamos Choral Society is preparing for its January 2013 Winter Concert that will feature Handel’s “Messiah.” Sign-up and music check-out will be at 7 p.m. Sept. 18, 2012 at the United Church. Regular rehearsals, which begin Sept. 25, are at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at the United Church. All singers are welcome.

     

  • Fingerprint angle falls short in burglary

     

     

    For all their efforts to rob the Hill Diner last month, the burglars only got away with less than $10. However, to Hill Diner owner Denise Lane, it was the principle of the thing that mattered. Not only did the burglars destroy a perfectly good cash register to get to the cash, but they also took the owner’s sense of security. 

    Recently, police revealed that though they took what fingerprints they could from the scene, none of them panned out. According to Los Alamos Police Department Capt. Randy Foster, the lab they were sent to could not get a good scan, so it’s back to the drawing board. 

    “We are still continuing to follow up on the case,” Foster said. “We are going to talk to all the original people we talked to before and see what we come up with.”

  • Pojoaque River Art Tour
  • Watch the bats take flight

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center will air a free live webcast of the bat flight from Bracken Cave near San Antonio, Texas from 5-6:30 p.m. Sept. 18.  Chris Judson from Bandelier will be on hand to talk about the bat flight and answer questions.

    Did you know that the 20 million Mexican free-tailed bats living in Bracken Cave eat approximately 200 tons of insects every night? They emerge from the cave each evening to feed, to the wonder of scores of eager spectators.

    Now, with the age of technology, those spectators don’t even need to be in Texas. Those wanting to witness this exciting spectacle can watch “BatsLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure” via webcast.

    Bats are the only mammals that can fly, thanks to their modified fingers and thin membrane. In order to catch insects, most bats are highly maneuverable, fly very fast and sometimes fly as far as 30-50 miles in one night. 

  • Adventures in Canyon Country

    “How I Learned to Lead ‘Priedhorsky Moderate:’ Forty Adventures in Canyon Country, Starting Age 10”

    Part coming-of-age story, part exploration of local natural beauty and part compendium of debacles, Reid Priedhorsky’s talk is about the canyons of the Colorado Plateau. 

    In photographs and illustrations, he will tell the story of his 40 adventures in the ethereal landscape, which inspired the alien worlds of Calvin and Hobbes’ “Spaceman Spiff,” at 7:45 p.m. Sept. 19 at Fuller Lodge.

    Priedhorsky will speak about impacts of growing up Priedhorsky and give a presentation to show exactly what happened as a result.

  • United Way kickoff underway
  • High Mesa Adventure

     High atop the mesa and deep within the Jemez forest, lies a special place full of historical logging villages and pueblo ruins. This area sees little motorized traffic aside from the occasional 4-wheeler or dirt bike passing through.

    Even those who pass through fail to notice the hundreds of cultural sites along the way. These sites are often completely camouflaged by natural foliage or rocks, only noticeable to those with a trained eye.  

    Within just a few miles of mesa, adventurers can see a historical logging village, a large pueblo ruin, hundreds of lesser pueblo ruins, and rock art from multiple periods of time. Those who desire to find these places will find their way with a little research.

  • UNM-LA set to propose two-mil levy

    The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Advisory Board is preparing to introduce a two-mil levy to the Los Alamos voters through a mail-in ballot in January. 

    The last time UNM-LA Advisory board tried to levy a tax on voters, it failed. This time, however, according to UNM-LA Executive Director Cedric Page, they are ready to take their case to the public.

    “As a board, we started discussing this last spring, and then meeting over the summer to try and shape our campaign,” Page said. The stakes are so high for the university that Page said they even took steps to hire a professional campaign strategist to help them get their message to the voters.

  • Woman taken to hospital after two-car collision

    A woman was transported to Los Alamos Medical Center this morning when her red  Nissan struck the rear end of a black Honda at the corner of Trinity and Diamond, Capt. Randy Foster confirmed.

     Foster said the driver of the black Honda was not injured and road was now clear.

    Stay tuned to lamonitor.com for details on this breaking story.    

  • Fed to spend $40B a month on bond purchases

    WASHINGON (AP) — The Federal Reserve unleashed a series of aggressive actions Thursday intended to stimulate the still-weak economy by making it cheaper for consumers and businesses to borrow and spend.

    The Fed said will spend $40 billion a month to buy mortgage-backed securities for as long as it deems necessary. It plans to keep short-term interest at record lows through mid-2015 — six months longer than it previously had planned. And it's ready to take other unconventional steps if job growth doesn't pick up.

    A statement from the Fed's policy committee said it thinks "a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economic recovery strengthens."

    The committee announced the series of bold steps after a two-day meeting. Its actions pointed to how sluggish the economy remains more than three years after the Great Recession ended.

    Stock prices rose on the news. But some economists said they thought the benefit to the economy would be slight.