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Today's News

  • Two S.F. art fests vying for top spot

    Two Santa Fe art festivals are currently battling it out in the top five of a national USA Today 10 Best Reader’s Choice Award contest for “Best Art Festival.” The contest runs until 9:59 local time April 13 and everyone can vote once per day from any location on all their devices.
     The Santa Fe International Folk Art Market and ART Santa Fe — two of the three festivals along with SITE Santa Fe that make up the “Art Trifecta” that occurs July 10-19 — are asking all art lovers from New Mexico and elsewhere to vote online everyday at 10best.com/awards/travel/best-art-festival/.
    ART Santa Fe is an established international art fair of 15 years that brings some of the best contemporary and modern art from Europe, Asia, North America and Latin America to Santa Fe.
    The International Folk Art Market — Santa Fe is the largest event of its kind in the world. More than 150 master folk artists from 57 countries gather on Museum Hill in Santa Fe to sell their art, which includes jewelry, textiles, baskets, ceramics and more.

  • Free orchestra show presents Beethoven

    The Santa Fe Community Orchestra presents works by Beethoven, Cherubini, Villa-Lobos and Gachupin at its Spring Concert at 2:30 p.m. Sunday.
    The concert will be at St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art in downtown Santa Fe. Admission is free, donations are appreciated.
    The concert features Beethoven’s Symphony No. 4, the overture to Lodoiska by Cherubini, and the Villa-Lobos Concerto for Guitar, with soloist Jesús Gachupin. Students from the Ortiz Middle School Guitar Ensemble will join the SFCO in a Side-by-Side performance of Grieg’s “In the Hall of the Mountain King” and  Gauchipin’s original composition, “In the Wolf’s Den.” Music Director Oliver Prezant conducts. For more information, call 466-4879 or visit sfco.org.
    The Santa Fe Community Orchestra is made up of volunteer musicians from Santa Fe and surrounding areas. The SFCO’s acclaimed Side-by-Side Program provides selected SFPS music classrooms with Classroom Visits by SFCO musicians and Prezant, as they work together on music that ties-in with an upcoming SFCO performance. Students then perform, Side-by-Side with the SFCO in one of Santa Fe’s premier venues on a regularly scheduled concert.

  • Santa Fe Opera spring tour is underway

    The Santa Fe Opera’s high visibility from the road leading to Santa Fe and Albuquerque makes it a familiar landmark for northern New Mexicans. SFO’s summer operas are a customary addition to the arts offerings in the area, and Los Alamos residents are fortunate enough to be less than an hour’s drive away from an evening of high-quality musical entertainment. However, the SFO has more offerings, including a series of free concerts, performed at venues throughout New Mexico, and even Colorado and Texas.
    For many years, members of the Santa Fe Opera’s Apprentice Singer Program have traveled to various locations to entertain community members and put on programs for school children. These programs are designed to be accessible and relatable. This year’s schedule takes the performers from Colorado Springs, Colorado, to Lubbock, Texas, and includes stops in many New Mexico cities.

  • Ethos Percussion Group comes to Los Alamos

    A compelling cross-cultural experience comes to Los Alamos on April 19.  The Ethos Percussion Group will perform Rhythms of the Silk Road, an exploration of the musical influences that spread along that ancient trade route from East Asia into the Near East and North Africa, around the Mediterranean into Europe.
    Highly regarded for their Western chamber music expertise, Ethos percussionists Trey Files, Michael Lipsey, Eric Phinney and Yousif Sheronick are also virtuosos on a wide array of exotic instruments. 
    Audiences will be introduced to the sonic possibilities of the Iranian daf, the Egyptian riq and dumbek, the tabla, udu and kanjira of India, Tibetian singing bowls and a host of gongs and drums from Java and China.
    For 25 years, Ethos has performed at major concert venues across the United States and abroad including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and London’s Wigmore Hall. 
    The ensemble has expanded the percussion repertoire by commissioning more than 25 new works from composers steeped in both western and non-western musical traditions.  
    Presented by the Los Alamos Concert Association, Ethos will perform 4 p.m. April 19 in the Duane Smith Auditorium on the campus of Los Alamos High School.

  • Be There calendar 4-9-15

    Today
    Aaron’s Kids Closet. A free store that provides clothing, shoes, coats, etc. for school-aged children. 6:30-8:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 715 Diamond Dr. For more information, call 662-6277 or visit firstinyourheart.org. To donate gently used clothing and shoes, call the church office or Michelle at 660-0340.

    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association meeting will be 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library. The speaker will be Irma Holtkamp and her talk is “Understanding Ancestry’s DNA Circles.” The public is invited. The traditional pre-meeting no-host dinner will begin at the China Moon restaurant at 5:30 p.m.

    Poetry Gathering. 6:30-8 p.m. in the Southwest Room at Mesa Public Library.

    The Los Alamos Photographer’s Show. Through May 2 in the upstairs gallery of the Mesa Public Library.

    Canyons, Mesas, Mountains, Skies: Heather Ward. Through May 16 at the Portal Gallery.
    Friday
    Book and Gift Fair.  9 a.m.-3 p.m. at The Doctor’s Lobby Area. Proceeds benefit Los Alamos Medical Center Auxiliary.

    Senior Appreciation Night Meeting. 10-11 a.m. at Aquatic Center training room.

    Nano Days. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum. Through April 12.
     

  • Nature Conservancy director to speak at Lunch with a Leader

    The monthly Lunch with a Leader will be 11:45 a.m. April 21 at the Mesa Public Library and will feature Dale Lyons, director of the Freshwater Programs for the Nature Conservancy of New Mexico. This event is open to the entire community and is sponsored by the Los Alamos League of Women Voters. Following the presentation at 1 p.m., the league members will continue with their annual meeting.
    Lyons was born in Santa Fe.  In 1994, Lyons received a bachelor’s of science degree in soils and environmental science and in 1998, he earned a master’s of science degree in disturbed land rehabilitation. Both degrees were from Montana State University.  

  • ‘Artful Evening’ raises money for arts council

    Los Alamos Arts Council (LAAC) is hosting an “Artful Evening” fundraiser starting at 6 p.m. April 18 at Fuller Lodge.
    The event will feature desserts by the Blue Window Bistro, music by Santa Fe Pianist Ron Grinage and a silent auction. The fundraiser will also feature a raffle for a Tiffany-style lamp. The lamp is currently on display in a window at Fuller Lodge.
    Debbie Huling, arts council board member and co-organizer for the event, said silent auction items include oil paintings, a quilt, wine goblets, jewelry, dinner for two at the Blue Window Bistro and a plane ride.
    Looking at the items donated to the auction, Huling said, “I think the quality of art is really good,” she added.
    While the doors open at 6 p.m., Grinage will begin his performance at 7 p.m. He will feature music by Russian composers such as Scriabin, Tchaikovsky, Prokoffiev, Schostakovich and Rochmaninov. Between pieces, Grinage said he will discuss each musical work and its composer.
    Huling said the audience will be in for a real treat. “He is featuring Russian composers so I think that is something very unique to this community,” she said. “It’s not something you get everywhere.”

  • A deepening divide



    For those pining for a Democratic Party that tries to represent more than the whims of the rich and powerful, these are, to say the least, confusing times.
    On the presidential campaign trail, Hillary Clinton has been promoting standard pro-middle class rhetoric, yet also has been raking in speaking fees from financial firms.
    One of her potential primary challengers, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, has been sounding anti-Wall Street themes, but only after finishing up two terms in office that saw his state plow more public pension money into Wall Street firms, costing taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars in financial fees.
    Similarly, in Washington, the anti-Wall Street fervor of those such as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren sometimes seems as if it is on the ascent — that is, until big money comes calling.
    Indeed, on the very same day Reuters reported on big banks threatening to withhold campaign contributions from Democratic coffers, Democratic lawmakers abruptly coalesced around Charles Schumer as their next U.S. Senate leader.
    CNN captured in a blaring headline how unflinching an ally the New York senator has been to the financial elite: “Wall Street welcomes expected Chuck Schumer promotion.”

  • No new taxes vs. no new debt: The standoff

    Deciding which public works projects to fund, even in a good year, exposes our fault lines — political, rural-urban, and governmental — but it also validates need.
    The whittling for this year’s failed capital outlay (pork) bill was more hard-nosed than usual.
    From the $200 million-plus hog, the governor asked for $60 million in capital outlay: $45 million for roads and $15 million for the economic development closing fund.
    State Bill 159 emerged from the Senate Finance Committee and passed the Senate unanimously. It included $45 million for roads, an attempt to accommodate the governor, and money for local projects of all 42 senators and 33 House Democrats.
    But not House Republicans. This is because the Democratic majority in the Senate, the Republican majority in the House, and the governor couldn’t agree.
    Senate Finance Committee Chairman John Arthur Smith, D-Deming, has said the state is up to its eyeballs in road debt. He refused to approve any more without a new funding source, namely an increase in fuel taxes.
    In committee, some Republicans weren’t opposed, but the governor, positioning herself for the national stage, was adamant.
    No new taxes vs. no new debt. Stalemate. When diplomacy fails, manipulation takes its place.

  • Iran aims high ahead of deal

    TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran is staking out a tough bargaining stance for the final phase of nuclear negotiations, with both its supreme leader and its moderate president saying Thursday that any deal must include an immediate lifting of withering sanctions.
    While that might be popular domestically, it could be setting the bar too high for what negotiators will be able to deliver in the final deal they hope to reach by June 30.
    Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei will have the final say on whether Iran agrees to a deal that could transform its relationship with the wider world — and he is keeping everyone guessing.
    In his first comments on last week’s deal, Khamenei told a gathering of religious poets on Thursday that he “is neither for nor against” it. His reasoning was matter-of-fact: Because the agreement was only the framework of a final deal and not the accord itself, “nothing has been done yet,” he said.
    “What has happened so far neither guarantees a deal... nor does it guarantee the content of a deal,” he said. “It doesn’t even guarantee the talks will go on until the end and will lead to a deal.”