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Today's News

  • Today In History, Oct. 18
  • Today in history Oct. 18
  • Be There 10-17-14

    Today
    Mountain Elementary Halloween Carnival. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Weather permitting, game booths will be outdoors on the upper playground. Festivities include the haunted house, book fair, cake walk, face painting, game booths and prizes. Tickets are $5 for 20; games are three tickets each, cake walk is four tickets and haunted house is five. All proceeds benefit the students of Mountain School through the PTA.

    Tradition and Change in Córdova, New Mexico: The 1939 Photographs of Berlyn Brixner & The López Family of Wood Carvers. Daily in the changing exhibit space in the Los Alamos History Museum through October.

    “Masquerade.” Daily through Nov. 15 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center.
    Saturday
    The Annual Jemez Trail Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. along N.M. 4. Take a four-mile detour at Mile Marker 27 and just follow the signs. Many yard sale items at the barn area plus meet the alpacas and dogs at Aspen Ridge Alpacas on Thompson Ridge. Alpacas will be for sale. Do not bring own dogs. For more information call Mickey and Evelyn at 575-829-3312.

    Fuller Lodge Art Center’s 37th Annual Juired “Gateway to the Holidays” Arts & Crafts Fair. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road.

  • Uranium transportation discussed during 'Manhattan' episode 12

    There is one episode and Historical Society viewing party left for WGN’s “Manhattan.”
    “Manhattan,” a fictionalized look at life in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project, only has one episode in the season left. The Historical Society wants to continue to thank everyone who comes to our viewings and discussions for contributing their thoughts, questions and experiences. The society looks forward to the season finale on Sunday.
    Every week the society updates a bulletin board in the museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues. Previous episodes are discussed at losalamoshistory.org, on the society’s Facebook page and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sunday at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 8–9:30 p.m. for a viewing and discussion of “Manhattan’s” season finale (TV-14 rating).
    Episode 12: “The Gun Model”
    How was uranium transported to Los Alamos from Oak Ridge?

  • Church Listings 10-17-14

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.

    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.

  • Bible Answers: A loving God still condemns?

    “Why would a loving God send people to hell?”—Dwayne

  • Dogs and chocolate are a bad combination

    The Halloween season brings with it much amusement and excitement, and one anticipated tradition is the variety of chocolate you have an excuse to enjoy. While all of these Halloween treats may only bring your children a sugar rush and a tummy ache, it can do much more serious damage to your pets.
    “Chocolate and caffeine belong to a group of plant molecules called methylated xanthine alkaloids, which are commonly found in a variety of foods, drinks and medications,” said Dr. Medora Pashmakova, clinical assistant professor in Emergency/Critical Care Medicine at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
    “As stimulants, they cause excitation of the central nervous system, heart rate, and respiratory centers of the brain and can also stimulate the body’s own secretion of adrenaline. And, when in the form of candy and chocolate bars, they taste delicious, which is why dogs love to eat them in such large quantities!”
    As a rule of thumb, the higher the cocoa concentration, the more theobromine, which is the active ingredient that is toxic in high doses. Baker’s chocolate, for example, can be particularly concerning, while white chocolate contains no cocoa and is not actually toxic to dogs.

  • ISIS, Ebola and Elvis Presley

    “Wise men say, only fools rush in.” To tell you the truth, I’ve always been annoyed by that song. Elvis Presley slurs it so much that I had to look up the lyrics to figure out what he was whining about.
    Yes, angels fear to tread rock and roll!
    Fear is an interesting commodity. It refuses to adhere to well-founded economic principles of supply and demand.
    When the supply of fear is readily available (and it always is), the price goes up, not down. Likewise, people fear to fear, so no one really wants it. And yet with virtually no demand for it, the price continues to skyrocket.
    So as another election looms in the near future, we have to wonder where all this fear is coming from. Why the sudden onslaught of fear for sale?
    Christian Nestell Bovee said it best (without using the word “moronic,” which definitely proves we’re not related). “We fear things in proportion to our ignorance of them.”
    It’s the same old story. We fear what we don’t understand, and we hate what we fear. We fear fear and spiral into a never-ending cycle of panic and dread.
    Let’s take a look at the tsunami of fear drenching us in the news these days.

  • Ex-POWs visit Japan

    TOKYO (AP) — The prisoners of war held in Tokyo's Omori POW camp saw some of the most horrific destruction during the last months of World War II, as American B-29 bombers dropped incendiary bombs that obliterated much of the city.
    But in those hungry times, they also were among the luckiest, says Bill Sanchez, 96, who along with two other former prisoners visited on Thursday the Heiwajima Kannon, a statue of the Goddess of Mercy built near the site of the former POW camp to mourn the war dead.
    Like many other POWs held in Omori, Sanchez was put to work loading and unloading cargo on the docks.
    "Which was great work because we had a lot of opportunities to pinch food. We learned real quick," said Sanchez, of Monterey Park, California, who watched as American fire bombs incinerated nearby neighborhoods.
    The Omori camp's barracks once occupied nearly half of a tiny island reclaimed from Tokyo Bay with help from prisoners like Sanchez. Today Heiwajima, or Peace Island, is barely distinguishable from the rest of Tokyo. The camp's former site is now a boat racing venue surrounded by bland office buildings.

  • EM head visits WIPP, LANL

     EM Acting Assistant Secretary Mark Whitney Thursday visited the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., where he became the first non-WIPP employee to tour the underground facility since a truck fire and unrelated radiological release temporarily closed the facility in February.
     “EM and the greater DOE is committed to reopening WIPP to support the important mission of cleaning up the nation’s legacy of nuclear waste,” Whitney said. “DOE’s highest priority is the safety, health and protection of the public, the workers, the community, and the environment.”
    Whitney also made a visit to the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    EM’s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco appreciated Whitney’s visit to WIPP.
    “We believe today’s tour of the underground facility represents a significant benchmark for progress toward resumption of normal activities at the facility,” Franco said. CBFO has responsibility for WIPP and the National Transuranic Program.
    A recovery plan outlining the necessary steps to resume operations at the transuranic waste disposal site was released in September, and CBFO staff and contractors have been actively engaged in accident investigations and recovery related activities since the early days following the events.