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Today's News

  • Mid-season concert includes solo by Los Alamos resident

    The Santa Fe Community Orchestra (SFCO) presents works by Nielsen, Sibelius, Bruch and Vivaldi at its mid-season concert. The show begins at 2:30 p.m. March 1 at the St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art in downtown Santa Fe. Admission is free, however, donations are appreciated.
    Brian Newnam is a Los Alamos resident and a well known string player in the area. He will be a soloist at the SFCO performance. He will be playing viola in the Bruch Romance for Viola.  
    This concert features Nielsen’s Symphony No.2: The Four Temperaments, plus the symphonic poem, Finlandia by Sibelius. The program also includes winners of the SFCO Concerto Competition, along with Newnam, Eve Kaye and Anne Hays Egan will perform the first movement of Vivaldi’s Concerto for Two Violins in A minor. Music director Oliver Prezant will serve as conductor. For more information, call 466-4879, or visit sfco.org.
    The award-winning Santa Fe Community Orchestra, established in 1982, is made up of volunteer musicians from Santa Fe and surrounding areas.  The SFCO presents five free concerts every season, education programs for public school students and concert audiences, and special events like “Let’s Dance!” an annual swing and ballroom dance at the Convention Center. 

  • Santa Fe theatre premieres Benjamin’s new play

    Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe presents the world premiere of “Not Quite Right,” an upbeat family comedy by Elaine Jarvik and Los Alamos playwright Robert F. Benjamin.
    “Not Quite Right” features a misshapen pot, a marathon dance and a three a.m. mêlée over “what’s enough?”  Three couples grapple with dueling expectations in the wee hours of the morning when everything seems, well, not quite right.
    The story is a comedic family drama about three married couples. The first couple is Carol and Marty who are nearly age 60. He lost his job several months ago and Carol thinks he might have been fired. She is habitually critical of Marty’s eccentric behavior and clothing, but she tries to be supportive until she learns his secrets.
    The second couple, age mid-30s is Jessica and Andrew, parents of twins in kindergarten. While at a fundraiser marathon dance, they clash about whether to have another child. Jess’s idealism about overpopulation seems to trump Andrew’s desire for more children.
    The third couple, late age 50s, is Sally and Tom. He just won an award at work, which triggers his thoughts about what a dismal career he’s had and how he’s expecting his children will do better. How much success is enough?

  • Be There calendar 2-19-15

    Today
    Science on Tap. 5:30-7 p.m. at Unquarked Wine Room. Harshini Mukundan, research scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will discuss the global threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    The Republican Party of Los Alamos County will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m., at UNM-LA, room 610. The public is welcome to attend a presentation on “Global Warming Science: Where we are Now” by Chick Keller. A business meeting will follow.

    The Dust, Drought and Dreams Gone Dry exhibit in the Upstairs Art Gallery. On display through today.

    “In Bounds.” Abstract expressionism in “The Heat of the Day,” by Dianna Shomaker. Daily through Sunday in the Portal Gallery.

    The Paintings of Francis Harlow: Portraits & Pottery. Ongoing through February at the Los Alamos History Museum.
    Saturday
    Waffle breakfast fundraiser. 7:30-10:30 a.m. at 15th and Canyon Road. The event is sponsored by the Pajarito Lodge No. 66 and the Northern New Mexico Blue Star Mother’s Chapter 4. $7 adults, $3 for children 6 and under. Proceeds go to providing care packages for deployed military.

  • PEEC seeking docents for new nature center

    This April will mark another milestone for Los Alamos: the much-anticipated Nature Center will open its doors to residents and visitors alike, so they can learn all about the nature they experience on the Pajarito Plateau.
    The new nature center will be run by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    PEEC will be hosting an event from 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 24 at its current location at 3540 Orange Street, for those interested in learning more about becoming a volunteer docent.
    The informal event will be open-house style, so anyone can drop in during the event. PEEC staff and current volunteers will be on hand to discuss what skills are needed to be a docent and what can be expected in this highly visible volunteer job. Pastries, coffee and tea will be served.
    To learn more about becoming a docent or for information, contact PEEC Volunteer Coordinator Linda Boncella at linda@peecnature.org or 662-0460.

  • Restaurant Inspections 2-19-15

    Santa Fe
    El Paseo, 208 Galisteo St.
    Date Inspected: Dec. 18
    Violations: Three high-risk violations. Eggs raw stored above ready to eat food (corrected). Not sanitizing glassware in bar area three-compartment sink 0ppm (corrected 50 ppm). Hard surface sanitizer +200ppm (corrected 100 ppm). Employee drink in prep area not in container with straw and lid (corrected). Two moderate-risk violations. Particle accumulation on ice machine and bottom of freezer. Peeling paint above hand washing sink. Two low-risk violations. Floor tiles cracked or missing in food prep, food storage and toilet rooms. Light cover in food prep area cracked
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow-up required.

  • Summer camps blend science and art

    It is the thought that children learn best when they are having fun. A summer camp where art and science merge is now accepting applications for kids in Los Alamos. The camps start in July. Registration is now underway for Big Sky Build It! in Los Alamos.
    Camps in Santa Fe start in June and vary slightly from the Los Alamos schedule. For details about the Santa Fe programs, visit bigskylearning.com.
    Developed in 1996, Big Sky Learning has provided innovative, hands on programs for children, teens and teaching professionals. Campers learn to make high-flying rockets, designing and building their own robots and soldering music systems for their iPods.
    “The classes are a small ration of teacher to camper,” said Michael Sheppard, Big Sky Learning founder and director. Big Sky Build It! is the camp that branched out to Los Alamos three years ago. “We are seeking participants to keep the program going,” he said.
    Courses are scheduled at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each program is a week long and goes for three weeks. The current schedule for the Los Alamos program is July 13-23.
    Instructors consist of teacher and teen educators. The program is partnered with Santa Fe Public Schools and Sheppard said the program is in the process of partnering with Los Alamos Public Schools.  

  • ‘It Was a Real Killing Field’ — Remembering Iwo Jima

    On Feb. 19, 1945, 20-year-old Bill Young of Mooresville, North Carolina, disembarked an LST on a miserable hunk of black rock called Iwo Jima. He was part of a 75-mile-long convoy of ships preparing to dislodge the Japanese from this volcanic remnant of an island. The territory was formally part of Japan, meaning it was considered literal sacred ground to Japanese soldiers.
    Just how many Japanese were there, and where, was a mystery to Young and the approaching Marines. It took his crewmen six weeks to arrive. They slept in cots under a tarp erected on the deck — all beds below were taken up by as many men as the U.S. military could jam on one boat. But that little bit of discomfort was nothing compared to what was unexpectedly awaiting them.    
    “The plan was to be at Iwo Jima just a few days to mop it up — less than a week we were told,” Young told me. They would tidy up things and then move on. The Japanese, however, had other plans.      
    “I ended up there for 37 days,” Young said, who stayed for the full duration of the unforeseen hell ahead. “We ran into more resistance than we ever thought imaginable. It was a real killing field.”    

  • Moral Monday lacks true morality

    Ethics and morality are different.
    Ethics involves “developing personal qualities of excellence.” The big picture, morality, “requires command-issuing universal law… willingness to obey the laws of God and nature.” The distinction comes from Eva Brann, a teacher at St. John’s College.
    Now comes the advent of Moral Monday, a construct in New Mexico of the New Mexico Federation of Labor, according to New Mexico Voices for Children, which used the Feb. 9 event to pitch its agenda through 10 speakers.
    Wikipedia calls Moral Monday “a grassroots social justice movement” that began in 2013 in North Carolina in response to the evil (my word) conservative deeds of Republican Gov. Pat McCrory, elected in 2012 along with Republican majorities in both houses of the legislature. Getting arrested seems part of the North Carolina approach.
    The approach here seems more laid back, from what I can deduce from the Voices release.
    Still, the whole thing is fraught with arrogance. Nothing seems to be happening that has passing acquaintance with the laws of God and nature. Pope Francis seems to have cornered this topic with his continuing message of pastoral work.
    Government is quite different. Go way back to 1690 and John Locke, who provided an early articulation of today’s approach.

  • 'Toppers down Spartans, 67-53

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls basketball team kept pace with the Del Norte Knights for second place in the district standings Tuesday.
    Los Alamos jumped out to a big lead after one quarter and held it the rest of the way. Bernalillo’s Spartans tried to make a late push, but was well out of contention at that point and the Hilltoppers prevailed 67-53.
    The Hilltoppers (21-4 overall, 5-2 in 2-5A) outscored the Spartans (6-18, 2-5) 24-8 in the first quarter and added to that lead for both the second and third quarters.
    Los Alamos and Del Norte will battle Friday night at Griffith Gymnasium with a potential runner-up spot on the line.
    Also Tuesday, Española Valley (21-3, 6-1) clinched no worse than a tie for first place in the regular season district race by pounding Capital 72-34.

  • Ski Report 2-19-15

    Angel Fire
    43-inch base. No new snow reported. 73 trails and 6 lifts open.

    Pajarito
    27-inch base. No new snow reported. Will reopen Friday.

    Red River
    34-inch base. No new snow reported. 57 trails and 7 lifts open.

    Sandia
    20-inch base. No new snow reported. 33 trails and 4 lifts open.

    Sipapu
    36-inch base. No new snow reported. 39 trails and 5 lifts open.

    Ski Apache
    30-inch base. No new snow reported. 52 trails and 7 lifts open.
    Ski Santa Fe
    42-inch base. No new snow reported. 77 trails and 6 lifts open.

    Taos
    42-inch base. No new snow reported. 83 trails and 15 lifts open.

    Angel Fire Nordic
    5-inch base. No new snow reported. 5 trails open.

    Chama XC
    46-inch base. No new snow reported.

    Enchanted Forest
    20-inch base. No new snow reported. 33 trails open.

    Valles Caldera
    2-inch base. No new snow reported. 4 trails open.