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Today's News

  • Neal statement

    BPU board chair Timothy Neal provided the following statement regarding his actions on July 8.
    “Before public comment, immediately following my statements on behalf of the Board and presentation of Department arguments by DPU managers, I announced that because of the unusual situation of the board receiving three new members simultaneously, I wished to speak on behalf of the new Board. Even though the new board had not yet met, I told council tiered water rates would be on their agenda. Citing recent data from Albuquerque and Rio Rancho, I explained that the desired 6 pecent revenue increase would probably not be achieved and suggested the approach to the rate structure be given to the new Board for review. Based on DPU information I had received that the water budget was not in serious trouble, I noted that implementation of the new structure could be delayed as much as two months. During public comment, I spoke about inequality aspects as an individual. Now that the decision has been made by council, we are implementing it and the subject is completed.”
     

  • County releases citizens' survey

     

    The Los Alamos County’s bi-annual citizen survey results were released and are available for the public to review.

    A complete copy of the survey can be found on LAMonitor.com.

    The firm under contract to conduct the county’s survey was Research & Polling, Inc. in Albuquerque. They randomly selected approximately 400 county residents to participate in a short phone survey.

    The survey included a variety of questions about county programs and services, community needs, quality of life and openness and transparency of government. The county has been regularly conducting citizen satisfaction surveys since 1996. County staff use the information gained from the survey to help guide the county’s goals for service and program improvements.

    According to the polling company, a sample size of 423 at a 95 percent confidence level provides a maximum margin of error of approximately 4.8 percent. In theory, in 95 out of 100 cases, the results based on a sample of 423 will differ by no more than 4.8 percentage points in either direction from what would have been obtained by interviewing all county residents.

    Here are some of the highlights.

  • Today In History, Aug. 19
  • VIDEO: Researcher Testing On-Field Concussion Scanners
  • VIDEO: Smokey and a Few Good Friends
  • Be There 08-19-14

    Today
    The Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of The Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) will have Dr. Amanda M. Barry of Los Alamos National Laboratory as its guest speaker. 6 p.m. social period, followed by dinner and talk at the Los Alamos Research Park in main meeting room. Cost for dinner is $25 per person. RSVP for the dinner is needed by Sunday. Call Lt. Col. Norman G. Wilson, USAF Retired, Chapter Senior Vice Commander and Past Chapter Commander, 662-9544 (email NrmWil5@cs.com), or Adjutant Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email depinyan@cybermesa.com).

    As a follow-up to Valerie Plame’s visit last week supporting Stephanie Garcia Richard, the movie “Fair Game,” about her outing as a CIA operative by the Bush administration will be shown at 7 p.m. at the Democrat Headquarters (next to Quiznos). An info session discussing volunteer opportunities will be at 6:15 p.m. All Democrats are welcome to come.

    Tuesdays at the Pond Series. 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond. Performance by the Bronach Celtic Blues Band. Sponsored by the Los Alamos Creative District. For more information, visit creativelosalamos.org.

  • Climber to speak about recent excursion

    Live to work or work to live? That’s a question that some of us will be left pondering after the August presentation at the Los Alamos Mountaineers.
    The monthly meeting begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge. The meeting starts with refreshments, reports on recent and upcoming LAM-sponsored trips, as well as a “safety minute” courtesy of one of the members.
    The feature presentation will be a talk by Lauren Heerschap will describe a recent trip, “The Right Place at the Wrong Time: Hot Limestone Climbing of Croatia and Slovenia.”
    Heerschap is an avid climber who bases many of her life decisions — where to live, where to vacation — around rock-climbing opportunities.
    A geology instructor at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, she uses her summers off to good advantage.
    In 2013, she and her husband, also a science teacher, spent about five weeks in Croatia and Slovenia climbing some of the best rock they have ever encountered. They climbed everything “from slabs to steep tufas to multi-pitch walls over 100 feet tall,” Heerschap said. “Only it was 90 degrees and 90-percent humidity every day!”

  • Assets In Action: Parent involvement is key to success

    Well, it is that open house time of the year for our many schools and I hope this year you will stop by the Asset booths, or perhaps introduce yourself to our great many Asset Champions at each school.
    These folks are volunteers, paid in randomly delivered baked goods, who just know how important that assets framework is, in the lives of our youth.
    The 2014 Teacher of the Year, Sean McComb reminds us that involved parents are key in helping students succeed.
    One of the most enlightening items from Beth Mattey, a 27-year career school nurse is, “sadness is one of the most common illnesses seen in schools today. There is so much we sweep aside that needs to not just come to the center of attention, but actually be talked about with our kids.
    The Parade and American Profile supplements respectfully remind us of two of the most important things in helping our youth.
    It doesn’t cost a thing for each of us to intentionally build assets and the number of things done daily, without herald would astound you.
    Our bevy of builders this year includes some familiar faces and some new additions to the pool.

  • Pecos league completes fourth year of independent baseball

    Professional baseball continues in New Mexico through Labor Day with the Triple-A Albuquerque Isotopes and spillover into the lower Mesilla Valley from the first-year El Paso Chihuahuas, also a Triple-A team.
    New Mexico had other baseball, organized and professional, during the summer of 2014 and it is that effort that this column pauses from all the state government matters of recent weeks to honor and applaud.
    Wait. The question might come from much of the state, “What other baseball?”
    Answer: The Pecos League of Professional Clubs.
    If the Pecos League seems a little obscure, that’s because in the grand world of baseball, it is. The Pecos League is one of eight independent baseball leagues. “Independent” means not tied to major league baseball, unlike the 20 leagues Wikipedia tells us are “affiliated.”
    Since I paid any attention to this as a kid 55 years ago or so, the old Triple-A, Double-A, A, B, C and D structure has turned into Triple-A, Double-A, High-A, Low-A, Short Season A, Advanced Rookie, Rookie and the Arizona Fall League.
    The Madison (Wisconsin) Mallards of the Northwoods League is the only one of the many minor league teams with which I have the slightest acquaintance other than the Albuquerque Isotopes.

  • Seducing Independents

    Early this year Gallup pollsters released a survey showing fully 42 percent of American voters either “lean,” or are registered as Independents.
    Only 31 percent of those responding to the poll said they are registered Democrats. Even fewer, 25 percent, were registered Republicans.
    Much has been made of these numbers.
    Some political onlookers find it ironic that members of Congress from a political party with only a quarter of nation’s registered voters are consistently able to block key legislation to the point of nearly shutting down the government. Others wondered how, in congressional elections two years ago, a mere 25 percent of registered voters managed to get enough of their fellow Republicans elected so as to have an outright majority in the U.S. House capable of blocking such legislation — especially since analyses of 2012 election returns reveal that fully 1.1 million more voters nationally cast their ballots for Democratic congressional candidates than Republican candidates?
    Questions of that sort vex politicians and strategists in both parties and the answers vary. Some say Republicans are more apt to vote than Democrats, and that may be the case — especially in off-year elections.