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Today's News

  • Births 1-8-16

    Dec. 10 — A boy. Kai Robert Larsen. Born to Karla Sartor and Brian Larsen.
    Dec. 22 — A boy. Zoddyn Sisson. Born to Thane Sisson.
    Dec. 25 — A boy. Aarik Rey Griego. Born to Stephanie and Daniel Griego.
    Dec. 27 — A boy. Andrew Yian Dai. Born to Yamin Hou and Yaomin Dai.
    Dec. 31 — A girl. Aria Jayme Garcia. Born to Amanda and Ruben Garcia.
    Dec. 31 — A boy. Ashton Chanin Lovato. Born to RatchaniDa “Nam” and Joseph Lovato.

  • NRC hosts tree seedlings sale

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service, in cooperation with the New Mexico Natural Resources Department, Forestry Division, is offering applications for low-cost tree seedlings sales.
    To be eligible, applicants must own at least an acre of land, and plant the seedlings for either windbreaks, reforestation, Christmas trees, erosion control, conservation education or wildlife plantings.
    There are many species available that are adapted to the area, in deciduous and conifers. For more information or to get on the mailing list, call 471-0410, ext. 3, between Jan. 1 and Jan. 31.

  • County Parks and Rec to put up putt-putt course at Nature Center

    The Los Alamos County Parks, Recreation, and Open Spaces Division is taking over the Los Alamos Nature Center from 6-7:30 p.m. Jan. 17 and putting up a putt-putt course.
    Play through the nature center and win prizes, including free passes to the pool or ice rink and more.
    It is a great way to learn about the latest news about the trails and enjoy a fun, free evening. This family-friendly event is open to all ages.
    The putt-putt evening will take place at the Los Alamos Nature Center at 2600 Canyon Road. The event is free and no registration is required.
    For more information about this and other Pajarito Environmental Education Center programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Hecker to speak at Fuller Lodge

    Dr. Siegfried S. Hecker, of Stanford University and Director Emeritus of Los Alamos National Laboratory, will be the next speaker in the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2016-2017 lecture series.
    Hecker will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge. His presentation will be “Are we still ‘Doomed to Cooperate?’”
    The lecture series theme is “Multiple Perspectives of the Atomic Bomb.”
    Hecker’s book, “Doomed to Cooperate” was published in 2016 by Bathtub Row Press. It tells the story of nuclear scientists from Russia and the U.S. who reached across political, geographic and cultural divides to confront the new nuclear threats that resulted from the collapse of the Soviet Union.
    Hecker will tell the story of how the book was completed during a time when relations between Moscow and Washington collapsed. He will also look at future prospects for the U.S.-Russian nuclear cooperation in the new political environment.

  • Community Calendar 1-8-16

    TODAY
     Feature Film: “We are Astronomers” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    MONDAY
    Nature Playtimes at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free.

    Chapter AK, P.E.O., meeting Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Jane Phillips, 110 Grand Canyon in White Rock. Pamela Massey is the co-hostess. Katie Brousseau will provide the program. RSVP to Jane at 672-1677.
    TUESDAY
    Family Night Sponsored by Kiwanis Club from 6-7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Come to the nature center for a night of fun activities.Free.

    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Los Alamos County Public Works Director Philo Shelton will speak on the upcoming election on the proposed county Recreation Bond Issue.

    Rotary Club of Los Alamos meeting from noon-1 p.m. at the Los Alamos Golf Course. Siobhan Niklasson of the Pajarito Environmental Education Center will speak on outdoor play.

  • Shelter Report 1-8-16

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar. When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home.
    Bingley—A soft and sweet gray and tan kitty that just wants a person to snuggle with! She has the sweetest meow that she uses to get your attention when she wants some snuggles. When she’s not snuggling, she can be found curled up in a cat bed. This older, petite girl would probably do better with older children.

  • GOP was right about ethics office

    The Wall Street Journal on Congress’ ethics reform controversy:

    The 115th Congress flopped into Washington on Tuesday with House Republicans proposing and then dropping marginal changes to an internal ethics office. The reversal is an unforced political error, but the GOP is right that the investigative body has the power to destroy reputations without due process.
    By the way, Paul Ryan was re-elected Speaker Tuesday with one GOP defection, while Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi lost four Democrats. But that news was dwarfed as the House considered rules for the new Congress, and Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte offered an amendment to restructure the Office of Congressional Ethics.
    The office is composed of political grandees, often former Members, and it has no prosecutorial power. But it conducts investigations into Members or staffers and makes recommendations to the House Ethics Committee. The proposal limited what information can be released to the public and barred the committee from having a press secretary. Also banned: anonymous tips.

  • Snow touches down in LA
  • Gov. Martinez will attend inauguration

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez plans to attend the presidential inauguration as campaign-season clashes between the nation's only Latina governor and Donald Trump fade.
    Michael Lonergan, a spokesman for New Mexico's second-term GOP governor, said Friday in an email that Martinez would attend the Jan. 20 inaugural in Washington.
    Martinez was critical of Trump throughout the presidential campaign and never endorsed him, but offered congratulations after his victory. She publicly denounced Trump's remarks about Mexican immigrants, his criticism of a bereaved military family and his lewd talk about women from a leaked 2005 videotape.
    Trump in turn harshly criticized Martinez for her handling of the state's economy at an Albuquerque rally that turned violent.
    Sharp divisions over Trump's election have politicians, celebrities and others debating whether participating in the inauguration is a tribute to democratic traditions or an endorsement of his agenda.
    Lonergan did not respond to questions about who may accompany Martinez, related events the governor might attend and financing of the trip.

  • US energy boss lauds opening of nuke repository

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — It was the determination of workers over nearly three years and pure ingenuity that allowed the nation's only underground repository for low-level nuclear waste to recover from a radiation release, the head of the U.S. Energy Department said.
    Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz told The Associated Press that resuming work at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southern New Mexico means the nation's multibillion-dollar cleanup of waste from decades of bomb-making and nuclear research is one step closer to getting back on track.
    "We are very, very excited about getting at least a resumption of operations," he said during an interview late Sunday. "I do want to caution we will not be at full speed yet for a few years."
    Moniz, Gov. Susana Martinez, members of the state's congressional delegation and others were gathering Monday to mark the reopening of the site.
    The repository was shuttered in February 2014 after a chemical reaction inside a drum of inappropriately packed waste caused the lid to burst, contaminating some of the disposal vaults, corridors and air shafts that make up the facility.
    The facility is carved out of an ancient salt formation about a half-mile below the desert surface, with the idea that eventually the shifting salt will entomb the waste.