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Today's News

  • John Pirtle

    Pirtle – John Pirtle, loving husband, father, grandfather, uncle and friend, left for life’s next journey July 8, 2008.

    John, a native Texan, came to Los Alamos in 1953 and fell in love with the beautiful scenery. He made New Mexico his home for more than 55 years. John was a security inspector at LANL for 41 years and enjoyed 18 years of retirement.

  • Bob Everett Comer

    COMER – Bob Everett Comer, Versailles, Mo., died Saturday, June 28, 2008, at home. He was born Oct. 28, 1936, in Jefferson City, Mo., the son of Louis Bernard and Mary Katherine Lampson Comer. On Nov. 21, 1962, in Kansas City, Mo., he married Sandra Kaye Ball.

  • Not what but how

    The page is turning on the climate debate.

    In recent years and decades, the role of climate scientists was to convince policy-makers and the public that climate change was an issue.

    That mission has been largely accomplished, according to Guy Brasseur, a renowned modeler of atmospheric chemistry.

    He said the question now is about informing the social and political systems on how best to respond and predicting what effects any particular response might mean to the future.

  • Judicial/jail complex gets green light

    This time next year, if all goes as planned, the community will dedicate a new, security-compliant, energy-efficient (LEED Silver certified) Judicial/Police/Jail (JPJ) complex at the corner of Trinity and Oppenheimer drives.

    The Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously approved the site plan portion of the long-awaited project during its meeting at the Community Building Wednesday evening. Chair David Izraelevitz was absent.

  • Traveling the world in search of science

    After growing up in an academic realm immersed in science and technology, and living under a roof with two scientists he referred to as Mom and Dad, 23-year-old Los Alamos whiz kid Naveen Sinha has gotten to travel the world sharing his passion for science.

    Replace the rock star posters with vine-like strands of cable crawling up bookshelves stocked with sci-fi books and you’ve got a 17-year-old Sinha’s Los Alamos bedroom.

  • Get ready to dance and whistle

    Los Pinguos brought their music to Los Alamos three years ago, making the Trinity Beverage Company explode with their Argentine tango, salsa, and mambo music. So much dynamite powered the performance that Los Alamos Summer Concert Series producer Russ Gordon has been working to get the band to return.

    He succeeded. Friday, the band will once again entertain the crowds of Los Alamos starting at 7 p.m. at 15th Street and Central Avenue.

  • Physicist is remembered

    The Los Alamos Historical Society is pleased to announce the publication of “The Forgotten Physicist: Robert Bacher, 1905-2004” by Los Alamos National Laboratory historian Alan B. Carr.

    The book describes the life and career of a man frequently mentioned in other books about the Manhattan Project but whose importance to that project and the atomic era has not been presented in depth until now.

    During an interview in 1993, Hans Bethe described Bacher as “the most important person (at Los Alamos) next to Oppenheimer.”

  • Children lead effort to stop the use of plastic bags

    Plastic bags have really left a mark on the environment. They are made from petroleum, harmful to animals, and rather than bio-degrading, plastic bags are photodegradable; the sun breaks the bags into smaller and smaller parts, but these pieces never go away.

    As a result, members of the Pajarito Envrionmental Education Center’s Kinnikinnick Club, a nature club for students in grade four through six, are working to wipe away the mark left by plastic bags on the environment.

  • Days and nights of stars

    A series of evening lectures focusing on astronomy and space sciences continues today at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Bradbury Science Museum.

    Astrophysicist Gabriel Rockefeller’s talk will focus on gamma-ray bursts, he said today, both the current state-of-the-art and also the relatively short history of rapidly accumulated knowledge.

    “How did we first discover this astrophysical phenomenon? How do the bursts form and what’s behind them?” he asked.

  • LAMC fined for improper waste disposal

    Improper disposal of infectious waste goes hand-in-hand with hefty fines from the New Mexico Environment Department.

    No place knows better than Los Alamos Medical Center, which was issued a $51,250 penalty by the state Tuesday for three violations of the Solid Waste Act occurring from October 2006 through January 2007.

    The inspections determined the hospital attempted to improperly dispose infectious waste at the county landfill – including two human placentas with attached umbilical cords, vials of blood, gauze, bedding, plastic tubing and needles.