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Today's News

  • Marathoner recovers from bear attack

    A woman who was attacked by a black bear Saturday in the Jemez Mountains is now recovering at home.
    Karen Williams was running in the 2016 Valles Caldera Runs in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos when she was attacked by a black bear Saturday. She was released from the hospital Sunday, and posted details about the encounter on Facebook.
    The female black bear attacked Williams after she surprised it as she was coming over a hill. The bear bit at her neck and head, but went away when Williams curled up and played dead.
    “I tried to look around but was having trouble seeing much,” the Los Alamos resident described on her Facebook page Monday. “I tried to sit up but was nauseated and my arms didn’t seem to work right.”  
    Her husband, Mike Engelhardt told the Los Alamos Monitor Tuesday Williams just wanted to put the incident behind her.
    “She’s getting better and just wants to go on with life,” he said.
    Englehardt assured friends and family on Facebook that Williams was recovering after the harrowing encounter.   

  • Council moves some sheriff’s funds to police

    Los Alamos County Council approved a budget adjustment last week that moves money from the budget of the sheriff’s office to the Los Alamos Police Department.
    The budget adjustment allows an office specialist’s services to be transferred to the LAPD and makes it a full-time position.
    The move, made at the June 14 meeting, is in response to a resolution council passed last month, which moved process-serving duties from the sheriff’s department to the police department.
    “The primary issue there is retention of existing knowledge,” County Manager Harry Burgess said. “Within the sheriff’s department there is a senior office specialist position, which has a large role in that process serving issue, and we’d like to benefit from that particular person’s abilities and knowledge, as the police department embarks on a duty they have not performed before.”
    Sheriff Marco Lucero argued that his office should keep the office specialist, who also maintains the sex offender registry and answers phones.
    When questioned, he estimated that approximately 60 percent of the office specialist’s time is devoted to process-serving administration and 40 percent on other duties.

  • Today in history June 21
  • MOWW meeting tonight

    The Military Order of the World Wars Chapter 229 will meet tonight at 6 p.m. at the Los Alamos Research Park Building, second-floor conference room, located west ofthe South Mesa Fire Station.

    This month’s speaker is CPT Michael Helpin USMC, who will speak on “Fourth Turning.” Helpin is the commander of MOWW Region XIII, chair of the MOWW National Membership Committee, president of the Sunbelt Patriotic Youth Leadership Conference Inc., and past commander of the Santa Fe and Phoenix Chapters of the MOWW.

    Helpin is a graduate of the University of New Mexico. He has done many things in many places but mostly in aviation and airport management. Among his accomplishments are standing atop Mt. Suribachi viewing the invasion beaches of Iwo Jima; piloting a B-17 Flying Fortress; and making eye contact and exchanging a friendly wave with Queen Elizabeth II in London. Semper Fi!

    Parking is available east to the fire station (accessible from southbound land of the Los Alamos Canyon Bridge) or east of the Research Park building (access is through the LANL control stations to West Jemez road.) Entrance to the Research Park main conference room is from the ground level by use of the ground level elevator on the east side of the building to the 2nd level.

  • Fire reported in the Jemez Ranger District

    A small fire in the Jemez Ranger District located near Battleship Rock has been contained, fire officials said.

    “They kept it at three acres which is pretty phenomenal work on their part,” said Santa Fe National Forest Spokesperson Julie Anne Overton. “Our firefighters did a great job.”

    Fifty-five firefighters from three area companies helped combat the fire. 

    “That’s actually quite a bit for a three-acre fire but because of its location and the difficulty of the terrain, they opted to call in quite a few resources,” Overton said.

    The fire started sometime Sunday evening. The cause of the fire is still classified as human-caused and is still under investigation.

    Small plumes of smoke from the fire could still be seen from NM 4 at 2 p.m. Monday. Due to the wind, the smoke mostly kept in the trees as helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft dumped fire suppressant from above.

    Firefighters fighting the blaze plan to stay on the scene until 9 p.m. tonight.

    “They will then get back there tomorrow morning to monitor and complete the mop up,” Overton said.

  • Today in history June 20
  • Marathon runner recovering from bear attack

    A woman running the 2016 Valles Caldera Runs in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos who was attacked by a black bear Saturday is recovering from serious injuries to her head, neck and body.

    Wildlife officers tracked and euthanized the female bear Sunday that was responsible for the attack.

    State law requires any wild animal that attacks or bites a human be euthanized and tested for rabies. The bear will be sent to Española for testing, said department spokesman Karl Moffatt.

    The bear had three young cubs that officers are trying to capture and place in the care of the New Mexico Wildlife Center in Española, Moffatt said.

    Game and Fish officials said they were able to track the bear through a GPS collar it was wearing for a study about wild bears.

    State law requires any wild animal that attacks or bites a human be euthanized and tested for rabies, Moffatt said.

    The woman was released Sunday, according to the La Cueva Fire Department officials.

    Runners and volunteers working an aid station nearby came to her aid, according to a social media update from organizer Kristen Kern.

    “EMTs took her to La Cueva where she was flown to UNM hospital," Kern said

  • 'Rare, dangerous' heat headed to parts of Western US

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — It's a dry heat, Phoenix residents like to say about Arizona's hot weather. That bravado may vanish as the thermometer flirts with 120 degrees this weekend.

    Phoenix won't be alone in the oven. A strengthening ridge of high pressure lifting out of Mexico is on course to also scorch other parts of Arizona and Southern California, bringing potentially record-shattering temperatures.

    Though accustomed to triple digits, the upcoming heat spell is a rarity in Phoenix, a desert metropolis of 1.5 million people, raising concerns of heat stroke.

    Temperatures are predicted to hit 118 degrees in Phoenix on Sunday and peak at 119 degrees Monday. Such heat is "rare, dangerous and deadly," according to a National Weather Service warning.

    "This is extreme even for our standards," said Matthew Hirsch, a weather service meteorologist in Phoenix.

    The hottest day on record in Phoenix occurred June 26, 1990, when the thermometer reached 122 degrees.

    Extreme heat is likely to become more common, scientists say, blaming man-made greenhouse gas pollution.

  • Community Calendar 6-17-16

    TODAY
    Fuller Lodge Art Center PULSE exhibit day of celebration from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Volunteer Appreciation PULSE preview from 12:30-2 p.m. at Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave.

    Igor & the Red Elvises at 7 p.m. at Ashely Pond, Gordon Concert Series.

    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Astronomy Show FROM 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore our universe from the comfort of the planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults and $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Rockhound Geology Outing: Shark’s Tooth Ridge at 8 a.m. at the Nature Center. Find fossilized shark’s teeth embedded in sandstone. Cost is $10 for individuals and $20 for families; PEEC members save $2 for individuals and $4 for families. More information at peecnature.org.

    Young at Heart Hike at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join us on a hike that brings together people of all ages to connect, learn, play, and explore. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Art Center to hold day of celebration today

    Fuller Lodge Art Center will celebrate the marriage of art and music with its newest exhibit PULSE.
    The Art Center will host a day of celebration today that will include an exhibit preview and a volunteer appreciation event.
    Over 40 artists will be on display, many of whom have assigned a piece of music to accompany their artwork. QR codes will show side by side with the art so that anybody with a cell phone can scan the code and listen to the artist’s soundtrack.
    In the Portal Gallery, White Rock artist Britton Donharl will be opening her solo show, 101 Faces. Britton has used a plethora of media to bring faces, both real and imagined, to life.
    During the opening reception, the Fuller Lodge Art Center will stop all of the music and have a moment of silence for the victims of the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando.
    Also on Friday at the Art Center and in the Pajarito Room at the Fuller Lodge, the New Mexico Garden Clubs, District 2 members of Floral Designers, Los Alamos Garden Club, and Summit Garden Club will hold a Standard Flower show THE PULSE OF Life to coincide with the opening of PULSE.
    From 8-inch-tall miniature floral sculptures to large-scale horticulture exhibits, both buildings will be filled with greenery.