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Today's News

  • LAFD responds to California wildfire

    Three members of the Los Alamos Fire Department’s Wildland Division joined several fellow New Mexicans last week to help a neighbor in distress.
    They deployed to help fight California’s latest string of deadly wildfires – which now bears the name the October Fire Siege – along California’s northern coast.
    LAFD Wildland Division Chief Kelly Sterna, driver Van Leimer and firefighter Brian Palmer, along with one of the department’s sturdy wildland engines, were assigned to the Bear Fire in a place called Bear Creek Canyon north of Santa Cruz. They were asked to assist with water tending and clean up.
    The siege began on Oct. 8 and continues, resulting so far in 42 deaths, destruction of 8,400 structures and burned through 245,000 acres, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, also known as Cal Fire. As of Tuesday, more than 250 wildfires have led to the evacuation of 100,000 people. About nine fires are still active.
    The Bear Fire involved steep terrain with year-round homes in wooded areas, said Sterna. Members of fire departments in Rio Rancho, Sandoval County, Corrales, and several other departments also deployed, he said. About 16 people throughout the state were involved in assisting – part of a mutual assistance agreement with California.

  • LAPS considers draft policy on privacy of immigrant students

    Following approval of a resolution to guard the privacy of immigrant students by the Los Alamos Public Schools board earlier this month, on Thursday the board will take up first drafts of a policy and a regulation on the subject.
    The policy and regulation discussions, along with a report on Los Alamos Middle School academic progress and programs are slated for review by the board at its monthly work session, 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the Los Alamos Middle School, 1 Hawk Drive.
    The board also plans to talk about guided discussions that have occurred throughout the district’s community on changing start times for high school students.
    The proposed policy and regulation supporting students’ safe access to public education – regardless of their or their family’s immigration status – was the subject of a resolution adopted by the board earlier this month. The drafts are identified as the first reading for the board and aren’t currently designated for action on Thursday. Policies and regulations usually go through at least three public readings prior to a vote by the board, said Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus.
    Without a state or federal law requiring local schools to help U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, the board decided, with its resolution, that it would not do so without a warrant.

  • Arts and Entertainment 10-25-17

    Art exhibits
    House of Eternal Return, Meow Wolf. A unique art experience featuring a wild new form of non-linear storytelling, which includes exploration, discovery and 21st century interactivity. Located at 1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe. Call 395-6369 for information. Hours are Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed every Tuesday. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

    Taos Art Museum at Fechin House will present a retrospective exhibition of the artwork of painter Walt Gonske, to open at the beginning of the Taos Fall Arts Festival. The exhibition runs through Jan. 7, 2018. Winter hours (through April 30) are Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Summer hours (starting May 1) are Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Books
    Readers’ Club at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Enjoy discussions of readings about modernist art and artists. Discussions led by Elaine Trzebiatowski at the Education Annex, 123 Grant Ave., Santa Fe. For information, call 946-1039, or visit okeeffemuseum.org.

  • A scary box office weekend for everyone but Tyler Perry

    LOS ANGELES — It was a spooky weekend at the box office for nearly everyone but Tyler Perry.
    Perry’s comedy sequel “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” scared up a healthy $21.7 million in its first weekend in theaters, but the waters were rough for other new openers including the disaster epic “Geostorm,” the firefighter drama “Only the Brave” and the crime thriller “The Snowman.”
    Made for a reported $25 million, Perry’s film drew a mostly older and female audience, who gave it an A- CinemaScore. “Boo 2!” did a little less business than the first film, which opened to $28.5 million just last year.
    “Given that it’s a sequel, its performance is at the higher end of our expectations,” said David Spitz, who heads up domestic distribution for Lionsgate.
    The studio expects the film to hold well into next weekend due to increased interest because of Halloween, but it will also face some competition with the horror pic “Jigsaw.”
    But a slight drop for a sequel hardly compares to the catastrophe of “Geostorm,” a long-delayed $120 million disaster epic starring Gerard Butler that only managed to open to $13.3 million from North American theaters.

  • This week on PAC-8, Oct. 27-Nov. 2

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, October 27, 2017
    6:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 10-24-17
    1:00 PM Democracy Now!
    2:00 PM United in Christ
    3:00 PM Road to Recovery
    4:00 PM Uprising
    5:00 PM Democracy Now!
    6:00 PM Chamber Business Breakfast – Tourism Strategic Plan
    7:00 PM Los Alamos History – James B. Conant
    8:00 PM Los Alamos High School Graduation
    10:00 PM Living Treasures Ceremony
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, October 28, 2017
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, October 29, 2017
    6:00 AM FSTV
    5:00 PM The Prophetic Word
    5:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    6:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    7:00 PM United Church
    8:15 PM Suicide Prevention PSAs
    8:30 PM Mountain Chapel
    09:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Harry Potter exhibit marks 20th anniversary of first book

    LONDON (AP) — Harry Potter fans owe a debt of gratitude to Alice Newton.
    Alice was 8 years old when her father, a Bloomsbury Publishing executive, brought home a new manuscript for her to read.
    “The excitement in this book made me feel warm inside,” she scrawled in a note to her dad. “I think it is probably one of the best books an 8/9 year old could read.”
    Based on this glowing review, Bloomsbury published “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone,” launching a literary juggernaut that brought magic to a generation of children.
    Alice’s penciled note is part of the British Library’s new exhibition, “Harry Potter: A History of Magic.” The show, which coincides with the 20th anniversary of the publication of J.K. Rowling’s first book, is an unabashed celebration of the stories and their antecedents.
    “There are some rich historical traditions behind the magic in the Harry Potter stories, which J.K. Rowling was aware of,” said Alexander Lock, one of the exhibit curators, who added that he was impressed with Rowling’s ability to layer information and offer depth. “They go into the stories and make them so rich.”

  • Scaring Up Some Fun

    Come out to visit the Los Alamos Monitor’s scarecrow “Scoops Byline” and all of the other creations taking part in the Scarecrow Contest on Central Avenue. 

  • Fall color road bike ride set for Sunday

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Los Alamos Mountaineers are partnering to offer a road ride from Jemez Springs to the Gilman Tunnels and back on Sunday.
    Join Ross Lemons on a paved ride to enjoy fall colors, great company, and colorful geology.
    This trip is a bicycle ride on paved roads from Jemez Springs to the Gilman Tunnels and back. The Gilman tunnels are located in the most scenic section of the Guadalupe River Box and were originally blasted out of the rock in the 1920’s for a logging railroad.
    The cottonwoods along the route should be near the peak of their fall colors, making it a most beautiful ride. The total distance is about 29 miles with around 700 feet of elevation gain on way out and about 600 feet on the way back. The rock is a Precambrian crystalline matrix that is pinkish in color making it a popular area for technical climbing. 
    This is an out-and-back ride along N.M. 4 to Highway 485 and Highway 376 to the tunnels, with an option for those who prefer a shorter ride. The group should be back in Jemez Springs by about 12:30 p.m. where those who would like can have lunch at a local restaurant.

  • 2017 CROP Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot T-shirt design announced

    The annual Los Alamos CROP Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot traditionally asks local children to design a logo for the event t-shirt. This year’s logo artist is Jasmine Tierney, a seventh-grader at Los Alamos Middle School. 
    Tierney created a fun image for a local Dog Jog t-shirt and was asked to design the hunger walk shirt, as well. Tierney lives in Los Alamos with her mother Heidi Morris. When asked about her interests, Tierney said she enjoys helping others, as well as drawing and playing piano and cello. 
    The t-shirt design Tierney submitted shows an energetic stalk of corn and a friendly tomato walking along the Hunger Walk path, with trees on either side and our mountains in view. The cornstalk is leading a happy dog, looking very much like Sabrina, Jasmine’s own beloved pet.
    In recognition of her artistic efforts, Tierney will receive a free t-shirt, a small gift, public recognition and, of course, the honor of having her logo design printed on scores of t-shirts. The shirts will be handed-out to participants in the annual Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot on Nov. 19.

  • Statewide prostate cancer event dedicated to LA doctor

    The sixth-annual Conference of the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico will focus on breakthroughs and incremental improvements in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.
    The all-day conference, hosted by the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico (PCSANM, pcsanm.org), is a free event and will be from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 4 at Sandia Prep, 532 Osuna Road NE, in Albuquerque.
    This year’s event is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Peter Lindberg, of Los Alamos, who for about 40 years treated numerous prostate cancer patients in New Mexico. He died in September 2016.
    “This is a good opportunity for men making up our target audience – those over 40, and especially over 50, along with their partners, family, and friends – to spend some time learning about what could be live-saving information,” says Steve Denning, board chair of PCSANM.
    About one in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetimes. Between 1,300 men are diagnosed each year in New Mexico.
    National Cancer Society 2015 statistics also show that African-American men are more likely (about one in five vs. one in seven) to contract the disease than other ethnic groups.