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Today's News

  • County hears update on small-scale nuclear power pilot project

    Los Alamos County has until April 1 to decide whether to invest $500,000 to $3 million into a small-scale nuclear power project that has been in the works for two years.

    The plan would be to install the nuclear power system at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls and the county would purchase power from the project.

    The Carbon Free Power Project is a nuclear power project that is in the planning stages for the Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems by NuScale Power.

    Officials from Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems and NuScale Power presented the plan to Los Alamos County Council and the Board of Public Utilities Thursday.

    The main part of the project will consist of 12, 50-megawatt light water, nuclear reactor modules designed by NuScale, which plans to build the project in Idaho. NuScale plans to have the reactors online and plugged into the national power grid by 2025.

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has also expressed interest in joining the group, but the lab is still in talks with the Department of Energy.

    Thursday’s meeting was all about the county’s involvement.

    NuScale officials answered many questions about the safety and design of their project.

  • GRT bill passes first hurdle

    The Senate bill that would allow the state to continue to receive gross receipts tax from the Los Alamos National Laboratory, received unanimous approval from the Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee Friday.

    Regional Coalition of LANL Communities Executive Director Andrea Romero testified before the committee on Senate Bill 17, along with one of the bill’s sponsors, Sen. Carlos Cisneros, (D-6). Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard (D-43) is co-sponsor.

    “It went very well,” Romero said. “We presented what we know about Senate Bill 17… and why we need to stabilize this tax.”

    Romero described the committee as “very receptive.”

    The bill’s next step is the Senate Finance Committee. A date for the hearing has not been set.
    Romero also told the committee that the commission also encouraged non-profit contractors and their potential partners to organize themselves as for-profit entities, before they submitted a bid, just in case Senate Bill 17 did not make through this session.

  • Jones, Thome, Guerrero, Hoffman elected to baseball HOF

    Over 600 home runs. More than 600 saves. A .300 career average.

    In the age of baseball analytics, there’s still room in the Hall of Fame for big, round numbers you can count on.
    Chipper Jones, Jim Thome, Vladimir Guerrero and Trevor Hoffman were rewarded Wednesday, easily elected in the newest class headed for Cooperstown.

    “I don’t know how you tabulate or calculate WAR,” Jones said, referring to a sabermetric stat that didn’t exist for much of his career.

    “Yes, you can dig deeper,” he said. But he added: “What I want to see is batting average, on-base percentage, runs produced.”

    Designated hitter Edgar Martinez came close after a grass-roots campaign to promote him. Boosted by advanced metrics, he’ll get his last chance on the ballot next year.

    Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, both tainted by the steroids scandal, edged up but again fell far short.

    A switch-hitter who batted .303 with 468 home runs, Jones was an eight-time All-Star third baseman for the Atlanta Braves.

  • Defense struggles for LAHS in tough four-game stretch

    After being stuck in the middle of the league standings throughout most of the season, the Los Alamos High School ice hockey team returned to the Los Alamos County Ice Rink for four pivotal games against Telluride and Durango.

    These were especially important games, because matchups against Telluride provided the Hilltoppers an opportunity to take down one of the top teams in the league, while games against Durango offered LAHS a chance to distance itself from other teams in the middle of the league.

    However, the team was unable to capitalize on the opportunity, dropping both games against Telluride, losing one game to Durango and earning a tie in the other game.

    The struggles against Telluride have been consistent throughout the season, as LAHS drops to 0-4 against the Lizard Heads. Last weekend the team lost 7-4 Friday night and 9-4 Saturday morning.

    This year’s series against Durango has been more competitive, as the Hilltoppers won the first meeting in mid-December before losing two of the past three matchups. This weekend, the Hilltoppers tied the Devils 5-5 Saturday night and lost 8-3 Sunday morning, likely the result of fatigue after playing four games in three days.

  • Schwartz turned Eagles’ defense into one of NFL’s best

    Jim Schwartz inherited one of the NFL’s worst defenses and turned them into one of the best in less than two years.

    When coach Doug Pederson hired Schwartz to be the defensive coordinator in 2016, the Philadelphia Eagles were coming off three straight seasons ranked in the bottom four in yards allowed.

    Schwartz changed the scheme back to a 4-3 base and rebuilt the defense using many of the same players left from the old regime.

    He also brought a swagger that’s reflected in his players.

    Three-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle Fletcher Cox, two-time Pro Bowl safety Malcolm Jenkins, defensive linemen Brandon Graham and Beau Allen, and linebacker Mychal Kendricks were part of the unit that struggled under former coach Chip Kelly and former defensive coordinator Billy Davis.

    But they’ve thrived under Schwartz because his system fits their skills.

    “He always puts us in great position to make plays,” Jenkins said.
    Schwartz made an immediate impact last season, helping the defense go from 30th in yards allowed and 28th in points to 13th and 12th, respectively.

    This season, they ranked fourth in both categories and had the league’s No. 1 run defense.

  • Hilltoppers prepare for toughest test of season

    Of all the games the Los Alamos High School boys’ basketball team will play this season, there will likely be none tougher than the test the Hilltoppers face tonight in Española.

    The Española Valley High School Sundevils are the top-ranked team in Class 5A, and are viewed by many as the top team in the state of New Mexico, regardless of classification.

    This week, that stance has only grown stronger. Tuesday night in Española, the Sundevils faced District 2-5A rival, and No. 3 ranked 5A team, Capital High School in what has become one of the best rivalries in the state.

    And facing its toughest opponent so far this season, the Sundevils cruised to an 83-65 win. It was so decisive that the stands that were filled to capacity at tipoff were half empty by the middle of the fourth quarter.

    Capital, which came into the game giving up fewer than 55 points per game on average, gave up nearly that many in the second half alone.

    Española Valley is one of the most well balanced teams in the state, with the ability to defend every player on the floor, and score in a variety of ways.

  • Auditions for new play set for Feb. 4

    Los Alamos Little Theatre announces auditions for “The Dining Room” by A.R. Gurney, the final production of LALT’s 2017-18 season.

    Auditions will take place 2–5 p.m. Feb. 4, and 6:30–9:30 p.m. Feb. 5, at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.

    Auditioners are asked to prepare a short 1-2 minute monologue of their choice and will be asked to read scenes from the play. Copies of the script are available for check out at Mesa Public Library.

    The script calls for six adults (three women and three men) who each portray approximately nine varied characters. The production dates are May 11-12, 18-20 and March 25-26. The show is directed by Cindy Hines.

    The play is set in the dining room of a typical well-to-do household, the place where the family assembled daily for breakfast and dinner and for any and all special occasions. 

    The action is comprised of a mosaic of interrelated scenes – some funny, some touching, some rueful – which, taken together, create an in-depth portrait of a vanishing species: The upper-middle-class WASP.

    The actors change roles, personalities and ages with virtuoso skill as they portray a wide variety of characters, from little boys to stern grandfathers, and from giggling teenage girls to Irish housemaids.

  • LA County gets audit accountability award

    The New Mexico Association of Counties (NMAC) and State Auditor Wayne Johnson have selected Los Alamos County as the recipient of one of its annual Audit Accountability Awards.

    Helen Perraglio, the County’s Chief Financial Officer, was there to accept the award at NMAC’s Legislative Conference last week.

    The awards are given in recognition to large, mid-size and small counties that have done outstanding work on their audits, submitted their audits in a timely manner, and have sustained excellence with the highest audit opinions. In addition, an award is given to the most improved county.

    Los Alamos County received unmodified opinions with no findings in 2016.

    An unmodified opinion is the best opinion that can be given, and means that the financial statements are presented fairly in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. 

    This is the third time Los Alamos County has won the Audit Accountability Award since the inception of the awards in 2011.

    Doña Ana, Curry, Chaves, Guadalupe, Quay and Roosevelt counties also received the award.  

  • LAMS Hawks show well at Albuquerque tournament

    The internationally attended Albuquerque FIRST Technical Challenge Qualifying Tournament was held for the first time at the Next Gen Academy in Albuquerque.

    The Alpha Hawks, a team comprised of mostly eighth-graders, and the Beta Hawks, a team comprised of seventh-graders, competed in a field of 16 robotics teams with older high school teams, teams from Mexico, and Colorado. 

    After five seeding matches, where robots are paired together in randomly organized alliance pairs that compete against other robot alliances in this year’ challenge known as FIRST Relic Recovery, the Alphas were second ranked team and the Betas were seeded fifth.

    The top four teams automatically advanced to the semifinals but were required to choose one other team to complete their final alliance.

    The top team, Data Force from Highlands Ranch Colorado, impressed the participants and audience with its ability to complete all the games challenges and honored the Alpha Hawks by inviting them to join their alliance in the final matches.  

    However the Alpha Hawks regretfully declined the invitation in order to be in a position to invite and compete with their sister team, the Beta Hawks. 

  • Familiarity doesn’t have to breed contempt

    By Finance New Mexico

    One advantage of running a small business with family or friends is that the principals know and are committed to one another and the success of their enterprise. But intimate partnerships also have potential relationship-based perils, some of which could cause work-force demoralization, legal problems and even failure.

    The trick to making a small venture succeed is to acknowledge these risks from the start and institute processes to contain or minimize them.

    Conflicts are inevitable, so prepare for them: Disputes arise in all businesses, but they’re harder to conceal in a small operation that doesn’t have a formal complaints-resolution process or human resources personnel. Business disagreements can carry over from the partners’ private lives, with long-standing feuds, rivalries and disagreements poisoning business decision-making.

    Partners should refrain from taking sides in a business dispute based on loyalty or emotion; only facts should matter when deciding a course of action.