.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • County’s unemployment rate under 4 percent

    Los Alamos County once again had the lowest level of unemployment in the state of New Mexico last month.
    For the month of March, Los Alamos had an unemployment rate of 3.7 percent, which was a full percentage point lower than all other counties in the state but one, Eddy County.
    Los Alamos reported that 307 people were unemployed last month. That number was down slightly from February, but that drop may have been at least partially due to a dip in the county’s total labor force.
    In February, the county had a labor force of 8,400 people, but that number dropped to 8,364 in March. The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions, which puts out the monthly labor numbers for the state, didn’t offer an explanation for the drop.
    Statewide, the department reported the 31st consecutive month of over-the-year job growth for nonfarm payroll employment.
    Compared to a year ago, employment rolls were up 1.6 percent, which represents a net gain of approximately 13,000 jobs.
    The overall gains in March were down slightly from February, which was the strongest month for the state in terms of job creation since 2006.
    In the past year, the state has seen the most growth in areas such as education and health services, while professional and business services were up by approximately 3,700 jobs from a year ago.

  • Local real estate broker now certified as luxury home specialist

    Kelly Myers, an associate broker at RE/MAX of Los Alamos, completed a luxury home training course. She is now a certified luxury home specialist, according to a press release sent out Wednesday.
    To become a certified luxury home specialist, brokers must demonstrate an understanding of the demographics of the affluent, lifestyle segmentation, trends and amenities in selling luxury homes creating marketing plans for luxury properties.
    “The training provided new insight about the upper-tier market, helped me polish my skills and provided valuable networking contacts with other agents across the country who specialize in luxury properties,” Myers said in the release.
    A luxury property is defined for the Los Alamos market as a property that has sold for $450,000 or more. The figure is based on the actual sales price of the top 10 percent of home sold in the market.
    Myers has been in real estate in Los Alamos since 2005. She is a Platinum Award-winning realtor and is among the local RE/MAX agency’s top sellers during her career.
    Myers specializes in real estate in the local area, including Los Alamos County, Española, Santa Fe and the Jemez.

  • Local briefs 4-23-15

    County branding to be discussed

    There is a public meeting scheduled for those wishing to give input into the new Los Alamos County branding initiative.
    The meeting is set for 5:30 p.m. May 5 at Fuller Lodge. Those interested can give their input to representatives from Atlas Advertising, which is continuing the logo development process.
    There will also be discussions about the county’s strapline options. An initial strapline “Live Exponentially,” was rejected by the public earlier this year.
    Other straplines given to Atlas Advertising for consideration include the following:
    • Where everything is elevated.
    • High intelligence in the high desert.
    • Think bigger, live brighter.
    • Great. Beyond.
    • Absolutely brilliant.
    • Get to a higher plane.
    The development selection and process is expected to be conducted through the summer and fall of this year, concluding with approval of the strapline and logo.
    For more information about the program, call 662-8087.

    Unitarian Church votes for new building

    The congregation of the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos voted Sunday to go forward with plans to construct a new building, officials announced Monday.

  • New MRI could aid wounded soldiers, Third World kids

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World’s poorest regions.
    “MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool,” said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, “ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain.”
    But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy.
    “Standard MRI machines just can’t go everywhere,” Espy said. “Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don’t have access to MRI at all.  We’ve been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children.”
    So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting.

  • Nature center opens its doors

    Rain showers hovering over Los Alamos Wednesday could not dampen the spirits of the crowd waiting expectantly for the ribbon cutting for the Los Alamos nature center.
    The project has been five years in the making, since retired Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) board President Chick Keller saw an advertisement announcing that the county was accepting applications for capital improvement projects (CIP).
    “Immediately the whole weight of PEEC’s expertise had to come in and we just kept working and we hired a few more people,” Keller said. “And the volunteers — there has just been hundreds and hundreds of hours of planning going into all this. And I can’t name the number of people who have been involved.”
    Current board President Felicia Orth also stressed the collective efforts of not only founding and subsequent board members, but dozens of volunteers. Those supporters not only helped determine the design for the visually stunning structure but donated time, money and expertise to the developing exhibits inside and out.

  • Charter introduced for proposed environmental committee

    At the beginning of the year, Los Alamos resident Reid Priedhorsky got up at a school board meeting and asked why there were far fewer trees on the new Aspen Elementary School campus, theorizing that some died to construction-related causes.
    While administration officials acknowledged that some trees were indeed removed to make room for the new campus, others died from tree beetle attacks and lack of water.
    In any case, Priedhorsky succeeded in getting a dialogue going about how public oversight on environmental issues can be introduced into school construction projects.
    Priedhorksy and others proposed a committee be formed. At a recent school board meeting, a charter for the proposed committee, “The Los Alamos Public Schools Natural Resources Committee,” was discussed.
    While it seemed that Priedhorsky and others wanted a committee without district employees or members of the Los Alamos School Board on it, board member thought that wasn’t a good idea.
    “I think it’s very important for us to send a message back to the steering committee that ‘no, you work under the guidance of the board, you report back to the board,’ ” said board Vice President Matt Williams at the meeting.

  • Isotopes beat Rainiers behind Bettis' strong outing

    A two-run home run from Kyle Parker in the first inning gave the Albuquerque Isotopes (9-5) all the wiggle room they needed Wednesday night at Cheney Stadium in Tacoma, Wash., as right-hander Chad Bettis led the Isotopes to a 5-3 victory against the Tacoma Rainiers (4-10).

    DECIDING MOMENT: Six of the Isotopes nine wins this season have come when Albuquerque scores first, and that was the winning formula once again Wednesday night. After a leadoff walk to Brandon Barnes, Parker survived a nine-pitch at-bat and smashed a 3-2 pitch over the left field wall to give the 'Topes an early 2-0 advantage in the first inning. Tacoma answered with a run in the second, but Albuquerque added a pair of runs in the third courtesy of a Dustin Garneau double and another run in the fourth thanks to a Barnes solo shot.

    YOU BETTIS BELIEVE IT: Right-hander Chad Bettis earned his third start for the Isotopes and turned in a stellar performance. After allowing a solo home run in the second, Bettis settled in for four consecutive scoreless frames, surrendering only a single hit during that span. He finished the game with 7.0 innings pitched, three hits, two runs (both earned), two walks and four strikeouts. Bettis picked up his second win of the season.

  • Harriman joins UNM's basketball staff

    University of New Mexico head men’s basketball coach Craig Neal has named Chris Harriman associate head coach. He joins the Lobos after spending the previous three seasons as an assistant coach with the Nebraska Cornhuskers under Tim Miles. Harriman has also been a part of coaching staffs at Saint Louis and Nova Southeastern prior to his time at Nebraska.
    “It’s a great day for our program and for me to be able to introduce Chris as our new associate head coach,” head coach Craig Neal said. “He fits really well into what we do as a program and as a staff here at New Mexico. I wanted to find the right guy to be my right-hand man, and I have found him. He’s been around great basketball minds in Coach Majerus and Coach Miles. I am very excited to welcome Chris and his family to our program.”
    The Sydney, Australia native helped guide the Cornhuskers’ Terran Petteway, Shavon Shields and Dylan Talley into All-Big Ten selections in his three seasons in Lincoln. Petteway led the conference in scoring in 2013-14 and became the first Cornhusker to earn a league scoring title in six decades. NU also made the NCAA Tournament that same season for the first time in 15 years.

  • LA rugby ready for final game before state

    The Los Alamos Nukes rugby team will host its final regular season game Friday at Sullivan Field at 6:30 p.m.
    The Nukes will take Albuquerque’s Jr. Varks, which is mostly comprised of players from Atrisco Herritage.
    “They’re a big, powerful team,” coach Demetrio Cardiel said. “I expect a really good game.”
    After the game, Los Alamos will compete in the state tournament. All 16 teams are invited to the state tournament, but the top-eight teams will play in one bracket and the bottom eight teams will compete in a separate bracket.
    Cardiel said he expects his team to be in the top bracket. The Nukes are currently 3-1 overall.
    The Nukes won their last game, 38-19, against Oñate on April 18. Joey Sorenson led the team’s offense, scoring four tries in the game. James O’Brien and Mateo Cardiel each scored one try in the game. Cardiel also went 5-for-6 on two-point conversions.
    On April 11, Los Alamos lost its only contest of the year, 34-24, against El Paso.
    “They were a really big team,” coach Cardiel said. “I was really proud of (my team). We weren’t even supposed to compete with them.”
    Cardiel scored three tries in the game and was 5-for-5 on conversions. Derek Selvage also scored a pair of tries.

  • Woodroffe finishes just two seconds off prediction

    Jesse Woodroffe had the top prediction in this week’s pace race, which was held on North Mesa by the rodeo arena. Woodroffe was only two seconds off his predicted time.
    Lauraine Maness was next with a three-second differential while Jessica Baumgaertel was just four seconds off her predicted time.
    Cecilia Rivenburgh and Ted Romero both missed by seven seconds.
    In the one-mile course, Reid Rivenburgh finished first in 9 minutes, 56 seconds.
    Sue Elkins was the fastest female, finishing in 12:51.
    In the three-mile distance, Romero finished first in 20:33. Nikol Strother won the female category with a time of 21:43.
    Next Tuesday’s race will take place on American Spring’s road, which is 1.5 miles from the back gate at the junction of State Route No. 4 and N.M. 501. (West Jemez Road) up in the Jemez.
    The race will start at 6 p.m. One and three mile courses will be available.