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Today's News

  • Dad says suspects also were homeless

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A man who says he is the father of two of three teens charged with fatally beating two homeless men says that they too were once homeless, and he has no idea what prompted the brutal Friday night attack that police say left the victims unrecognizable.
    After their arrest, the 15-year-old told police that the trio had been targeting homeless people for the past year, according to a criminal complaint. He said they had attacked about 50 people over the last few months, but had never gone that far, according to the criminal complaint.
    “It’s so hard that he could do that to someone where ... I mean, like I said, we came from there,” said Victor Prieto, who identified himself to KOB-TV as the father of the 15- and 16-year-olds accused. “You know what I mean? We’re not there now, but that’s where we ... We got out of there.”
    His sons and 18-year-old Alex Rios were charged on Monday with murder and ordered held on $5 million bonds. The Associated Press is not identifying the minors because of their age. The teens and Prieto all have different last names.

  • For the love of animals

    The newest veterinarian at the Los Alamos Animal Clinic is taking the care of animals to a higher level.
    Erin Smith is no stranger to the field of veterinary medicine. The Los Alamos native spent time in South Africa in 2011-12 caring for large wild animals such as lions, giraffes, zebras and rhinoceros.
    Her interest in wild animals helped her strive to care for the sick animals in South Africa. “I would love to go back, I still have many contacts,” she said.
    A 2004 graduate of Los Alamos High School, Smith was on the swim team, with a passion for the sport until an injury forced her to stop competing.
    “I’ve had a love for all kinds of animals and was never very squeamish,” she said. Growing up, her home was filled with “critters of all shapes and sizes.”
    Smith started at the clinic about a month ago, after graduating from Colorado State University in May as a doctor of veterinary medicine. She also has a bachelor’s of science degree in biochemistry from the University of New Mexico.

  • Remembering Forrest

    Over 50 friends and relatives of Forrest Fukushima, including his father Eiichi and younger brother Craig, gathered at a spot on N.M. 502 just east of Totavi to remember him Saturday.
    A drunk driver struck Fukushima in 1986 while he was pedaling his bike up N.M. 502. He was reportedly training for an “Iron Horse” competition when Alex Naranjo, who is now a municipal judge in Española, struck him with her car.
    Though a tire blowout also contributed to the accident, Naranjo reportedly had a blood alcohol level of .18 at the time of the crash, twice the legal limit. 
    He was 20 when he died.
    A “ghost bike,” installed by the Ghost Bike organization, now marks the gathering spot.
    Local chapters of Ghost Bike install the memorials as a reminder that bicyclists share the road with vehicles as well.
     

  • Today In History, July 22
  • Few jobs from sunsets, many from oil and gas

    Oil and gas industry discussions by public officials and industry tend toward the many worthy numbers.
    For example, nearly all (96.6 percent) the interest from the Land Grant Permanent Fund goes into the state’s general fund, providing for continuing operations of government. The permanent fund predates statehood. Oil royalties appeared in 1924. Every county gets oil and gas production revenue.
    Find the report, “Fiscal Impacts of the Oil and Gas Industry,” at the New Mexico Tax Research Institute (nmtri.org). Check the right side of the page.
    Other numbers from David Martin, secretary of the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, at the Legislative Finance Committee’s July 9 meeting in Farmington: Jobs, direct, indirect and induced: 68,838. Average salary: $70,666. State gross domestic product portion: 9 percent.
    The numbers obscure oil and gas as a way of life with a long history here.
    Flush with “enchantment,” sunsets, and mystically seeking God, aesthetes miss this. They fail to track production numbers from the well to the permanent fund to investment income to the general fund to paying for the government they wish to expand.

  • Be There 07-22-14

    Today
    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood, the organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org.

    Summer Family Evenings: Pet Rocks. 6:30-8 p.m. Make your very own pet rock “siblings” – you get to keep one, and the other one goes in the Hilltop Garden at PEEC. Fun for the whole family. Drop in anytime. No advance registration required. $5 for non-member families/free for PEEC members. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    Tuesdays at the Pond Series. This week’s entertainment is Marcus Cavlante. 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond. Sponsored by the Los Alamos Creative District. For more information, visit creativelosalamos.org.

    Eureka! at Fuller Lodge Art Center. Artistic interpretations of discovery by a variety of local artists in a variety of media. The Portal Gallery features the work of Katherine Brittin and Charryl Berger. Daily through Saturday.

  • Community Briefs 07-22-14

    Volunteers needed at LALT for work party

    Volunteers are needed to get the Los Alamos Little Theatre ready for the new season.
    The community is welcome to come to the theater 9 a.m. Saturday.
    Dennis Powell will lead the riser painting effort.
    “We will be painting the risers. This will be applying a single color on the risers,” Powell said.
    Corky Howell will lead the repairs on the storage shed.
    If there is enough time and workforce, volunteers will pull weeds, prune and clean up the landscape.
    Participants are asked to bring work gloves, a hat and sunscreen.
    There will be coffee, juice, and light refreshments in the morning and a lunch to reward the volunteer workers.
    Sign up now for
    Family Cancer Retreat

  • Assets In Action: Start having conversations with your kids

    Today is one of those days where my column might annoy you. I heartily welcome your eye roll.
    Today I’m going to ask you to have conversation with your kids.
    Summer time is a time to decompress, relax, spend time doing things because there is more free time. I’m not talking about school personnel; I’m talking about our youth.
    I know it might not be easy and perhaps you haven’t done it in a while, but as long as they still live in your home, there’s always a chance to begin a dialogue.
    As school is two and a half weeks away, perhaps start by asking them what kinds of things they think they might need. When kids are in the older grades, there’s not always a list of supplies to get you started.
    When kids are younger, it is easy to take them to annual physicals, the dentist and other appointments to allow us to keep tabs on them, but that gets a little harder for some when as the years go by.
    As kids become teens one of the best parts about the Children’s Clinic is that they have the parent step out and they ask youth some pretty important questions that may lead to some good conversation, too.
    Big problems don’t start big; there are often signals, issues, or light bulbs that go on along the way.

  • Hiking, biking, beer and music at Pajarito Mountian

    The second annual Los Alamos Beer Co-op Fiesta is on Saturday at Pajarito Mountain Ski Area. The Fiesta features lift-served biking and hiking from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., as well as a New Mexico brewers fest with live music from Felix y Los Gatos, noon to 6 p.m. Atomic City Transit Shuttle will run from Sullivan Field every half hour from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    As part of the Fiesta, other Los Alamos cooperative businesses will attend to support the community and fellow cooperative. Representatives of the co-ops will be on hand to provide information about their cooperative business and to explain why everyone should “Keep it Co-op, Los Alamos.”
    Co-ops in Los Alamos include:
    • Los Alamos Beer Co-op (brewery/tap room)
    • Los Alamos Co-op Market (grocery)
    • Little Forest PlaySchool (child care/education)
    • Del Norte Credit Union (financial)
    • Los Alamos Schools Credit Union (financial)
    • Zia Credit Union (financial)
    Tickets are $10. For more information visit losalamosbeer.coop
     

  • Udall scores a win in tough battle

    Forget for the moment, if you will, all variant partisan predispositions — at least long enough to grant that New Mexico’s U.S. Sen. Tom Udall is one of those rare politicians who will persevere in the service of a conviction.
    Let me explain my point, and for starters we should recall that the United States Constitution has been amended only 27 times since it was adopted in 1787.
    We need also remind ourselves that that fully 10 of those amendments were adopted all at one time, right after the present republic was instituted when what we call the Bill of Rights was appended to the original Constitution.
    In short, amending the Constitution isn’t the least bit easy.
    It requires time, tenacity and resolve, which is precisely what the constitutional framers intended when they hammered it out in Philadelphia back in 1787. They even made it hard to so much as propose an amendment to the Constitution.
    One constitutionally permissible method for proposing an amendment would have at least two-thirds of the states call conventions for that purpose. It is an approach so cumbersome that it has never been used, mainly because getting two thirds of the states to act in concert is next to impossible.