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Today's News

  • Ortega leads boys track to fourth-place finish

    The Los Alamos High School boy’s track and field team finished in fourth place this past weekend at the New Mexico Athletic Association’s State Track and Field Championships.

    Steven Montoya, the team’s coach, said he is “pretty ecstatic” with the result, and that this year was a big success and a strong building block for the program.

    Part of what makes the accomplishment so significant for the program is the fact that the team finished in 13th place just a year ago. Last year’s team finished with 18 points at the state meet, while this year’s squad finished with 44.

    “I think last year was an outlier for us,” Montoya said. “I think we proved this year that we should be in contention at the state level. We should be a top-five team at state every year.”

    He added that on paper, the team did not appear to be strong enough to finish so well at the state level, but that they believed in their coaches, believed in their teammates and worked hard all season to earn their spot near the top of the leaderboard.

    When reflecting on the championship, Montoya felt the performances of two of his seniors stood out from the successful weekend: Liam Johnson and Nathaniel Ortega.

  • Girls track finishes as state runner-ups

    For the second consecutive year, the Los Alamos High School girl’s track team finished as the runner-ups in the New Mexico Athletic Association’s State Track and Field Championships.

    This year, the team finished in second place by just a half point, finishing with 67.5 total points to Alamogordo’s 68 points.

    Aaron Padilla, the team’s coach, said that both he and the girls are disappointed with getting second by such a slim margin, but that he is proud to say that his team was one of the best in the entire state.

    “We knew that the state meet was going to be tough,” Padilla said. “We did the best job we possibly could.”

    The state championship came down to the final event of the meet, the 4x400 meter relay.

    Los Alamos entered the event leading Alamogordo by 1.5 points, just needing to finish ahead of them to become state champions.

    Ultimately, Alamogordo finished in second place, while Los Alamos finished in third, handing the state title to Alamogordo.

    Despite that, the 4x400-meter relay still finished with a school record in the event.

    For Padilla and the girls on the team, this year’s runner-up finish feels much different than last year’s.

  • Cancellations, postponements caused by today's weather

    Bike To Work Day events cancelled 

    This afternoon's Bike to Work Day events have been cancelled for today due to snow, according to county reports.

    Summer Concert Series moved to Fuller Lodge

    The Gordon Summer Concert Series featuring Chuchito Valdes, scheduled to play at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, has been moved to Fuller Lodge. Show is still free.

  • New Mexico mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus

    SANTA FE (AP) — State health officials say mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus have been found in Dona Ana County.

    The New Mexico Department of Health says it's the first time this season that the mosquito species has been found in that part of the state.

    Mosquito surveillance in New Mexico's southern counties is part of an ongoing joint project to map the range and distribution of the species that can transmit the Zika virus.

    Zika virus can be transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito.

    The mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person already infected with the virus.
    Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites.

    Ten cases of Zika virus disease were reported in New Mexico last year.
     

  • Sportsmen gain new access, campsites on state lands

    Sportsmen have 141 new access points in 14 counties and two new campsites near Carlsbad on state lands, the State Land Office announced today.

    Of the new access points, 124 are open to walk-ins and 17 are accessible by vehicle. In all, there are now 345 access points and 11 campsites on state lands.

    “Land ownership patterns in New Mexico tend to lock sportsmen out, but as promised I have been working with our lessees to create a more open and positive experience for hunters and anglers,” said State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn. “Hunting is deeply rooted in our cultural heritage and my office is doing all we can to preserve these traditions.”

    Nearly all of the 9 million acres of surface estate managed by Dunn and the State Land Office are leased for livestock grazing and cropland production, and during New Mexico’s hunting season are open to hunters, anglers and trappers with a valid license and all applicable permits, stamps or validations.

    The State Land Office is partnering with the state Department of Game and Fish and the Bureau of Land Management to offer mobile maps of New Mexico’s big-game hunting units, hunting access points, and more through the “CarryMap” application.

  • Kite Festival takes flight this weekend in WR

    The Los Alamos Arts Council presents the 20th Annual Los Alamos Kite Festival Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Spirio Soccer Fields in White Rock.

    Thanks to generous funding by Los Alamos National Bank, Los Alamos Children’s Dentistry and individual supporters, admission to the Kite Festival is free.

    The Festival kicks off Friday night with the start of Gordon’s Summer Concert Series and a night kite fly demonstration.

    In this event, small lights are attached to kites before they are launched into the night sky. Winds permitting, it should be quite a light show over White Rock. The concert will feature Chuchito Valdes, an Afro-Cuban jazz band from Havana, Cuba and Cancun, Mexico.

    On Saturday, the Kite Festival will be from noon to 5 p.m. and on Sunday the festival will be from noon to 4 p.m.

    The ever-popular Candy Drop, which began in 2002, will be back, winds permitting. A plastic bag is filled with wrapped hard candy and is launched on a kite like a giant kite piñata. The bag is eventually split open and candy falls from the sky, but not until the children have chased the kite all over the field. This calorie-burning event is almost as popular with parents as it is with kids.

  • LAPD honors officers killed in 2016

    Los Alamos Police Department staff, family, friends and community members gathered Monday morning in the Justice Center’s parking lot to honor and remember those who had lost their lives over the past year, including three police officers from New Mexico.

    Police Chief Dino Sgambellone began the ceremony by welcoming those in attendance and also recognizing a recent loss from the community.

    “Although she wasn’t a police officer, we lost one of our own last year, Connie Salazar,” Sgambellone said. “For those of you who knew Connie, you know what a wonderful and giving person that she was.”

    Salazar was fighting a courageous battle against cancer and passed away in 2016. She was employed by the county for over 20 years and had recently retired. “Connie was part of our family and will always be missed. We are thankful for all of the wonderful memories we shared.” Sgambellone iterated that her loss will be felt by not only the LAPD, but also all of Los Alamos and asked for a moment of silence on Salazar’s behalf.

  • Organizers serve up food for thought at Bear Feast

    The first–ever Bear Feast at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center drew a crowd Friday that munched on salmon, grapes, watermelon, celery, peanut butter, candy worms, candy mushrooms, candy acorns and honey-dipped cornbread shaped like a beehives.

    The bear buffet menu featured the kind of food bears liked to eat, candy being substituted for what wasn’t edible by humans.

    Residents also got to feast on some bear knowledge from wildlife expert Dr. Kathleen Ramsay and bear attack survivor Karen Williams.

    Ramsay was linked to William’s attack when the surviving cubs from the attack were sent to Ramsay’s wildlife rehabilitation center in Española. Shortly after the attack, which happened in June 2016, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish tracked and euthanized the attacking sow to check for rabies.

    The sow’s two bear cubs were released from the wildlife center this year, weighing in at a healthy 160 and 140 pounds.

    Ramsay talked about the expensive and complicated process of teaching the cubs that arrive at her center how to hunt for their own food and survive on their own in preparation for their eventual release out into the wild. She also talked about their fixation on food and why it’s so important.

  • PEEC hosts grrreat Bear Festival

    On Saturday morning, the Nature Center was packed with booths, families and bear paraphernalia.

    The Pajarito Environmental and Education Center (PEEC) teamed up with the Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation (LEWF) to host New Mexico’s first Bear Festival.

    This festival brought national, state, local and independent organizations together with the sole mission of bear education and appreciation.

    PEEC Director of Interpretation Jonathan Creel explained that their hope is to be “raising awareness of how to coexist with bears,” like the steps to take in bear proofing your home and life.

    Creel gave credit to their partnership with LEWF and said, “The Land of Enchantment was huge in this whole thing. They put in a lot of time and effort, especially with the bear dinner the night before.”

    Dr. Kathleen Ramsay launched LEWF in order to assist bear rehabilitation efforts across New Mexico. Similar to PEEC, their mission is to make Los Alamos bear friendly and bear aware. Because bears are such intelligent, habitual creatures,

  • Aquatomics place well at the VAST Early Bird Open

    A total of 14 swimmers from the Los Alamos Aquatomics competed in the VAST Early Bird Open, which took place in the West Mesa Aquatic Center in Albuquerque this past weekend.

    The ages of the swimmers from the Aquatomics ranged from 8-14.

    One of the top standouts from the team, as well as the entire meet, was 12-year-old Andy Corliss, who posted the fastest times in both the mixed 12 and under 50-meter backstroke, as well as the mixed 12 and under 50 meter breaststroke.

    In the backstroke event, Corliss posted a time of 32.62 seconds, which was more than three seconds faster than the next-fastest competitor.

    In the breaststroke event, he posted a time of 36.03 seconds, which was four seconds faster than the next-closest competitor.

    Corliss also finished in the top 10 in both the mixed 100-meter breaststroke and the mixed 9 and over 200 meter individual medley.

    In the breaststroke event, he finished in fifth place with a 1:19.84. In the individual medley event, he finished with a time of 2:42.95.

    Another top competitor for the team was 10-year-old Sophia Pieck, who finished in the top ten in both the mixed 12 and under 50-meter backstroke and the mixed 12 and under 50-meter breaststroke.