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Today's News

  • Soccer: LA boys, girls take a dip in 4A polls

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys and girls soccer teams both slipped in this week's NMSoccer.com coaches' poll.

    Los Alamos' boys were ranked No. 4 in the poll, down one spot from the previous week, while Los Alamos' girls tumbled from No. 3 to No. 6 this week.

    The Hilltopper boys garnered 66 total points, five points behind Roswell.

    Los Alamos' girls, meanwhile, finished with 28 points, one point behind Aztec in the fifth position.

  • Chimps fate still up for debate

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A decision to move 186 chimpanzees from a southern New Mexico facility to Texas is pitting government officials and scientists against a coalition of elected officials and animal rights advocates, including New Mexico's governor and famed primate researcher Dr. Jane Goodall.

  • Violence in Jerusalem could cloud peace talks

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Crowds of Palestinian youths went on violent rampages in east Jerusalem on Thursday, stoning buses, overturning cars and facing down Israeli riot police at the holy city's most sensitive religious site following the shooting death of a local man.

  • Baseball: Twins clinch AL Central with Chicago's loss

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Twins arrived at Target Field on Tuesday night with a magic number of two, a day game on Wednesday and their AL Central rivals from Chicago playing late into the night on the West Coast.

    Even if they beat the Indians, the Twins said, they wouldn't be sticking around to see how the White Sox fared. They all planned to return to their homes and check the scores. If the Sox lost and the Twins clinched the division, so be it. There would be time to celebrate another day.

  • White House looks to boost health law at 6 months

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama once told Democratic lawmakers they'd be proud to campaign on historic health care legislation. Six months later, the only Democrats running ads about it are the ones who voted "no."

    Now, with crucial midterm elections approaching, the White House is preparing to use the law's six-month anniversary to reintroduce it to skeptical voters and trumpet new reforms that are taking effect, such as new coverage for preventive care and young adults and a ban on canceling insurance for someone who falls ill.

  • Tea party, Republicans try to find common ground

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Tea party activists and the Republican establishment are quickly joining forces for the fall elections as fresh cash and energy flow to the upstarts.

    Separate tea party groups still squabble over roles for Republican insiders within the movement, but the conservative activists and GOP stalwarts have reached a truce for the common goal of defeating Democrats, heeding calls for unity from Republicans including Sarah Palin.

  • GOP lawmakers block attempt to lift "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans on Tuesday blocked an effort by Democrats and the White House to lift the ban on gays from serving openly in the military, voting unanimously against advancing a major defense policy bill that included the provision.

    The mostly partisan vote dealt a major blow to gay rights groups who saw the legislation as their best hope, at least in the short term, for repeal of the 17-year-old law known as "don't ask, don't tell."

  • Basketball: Lobo men's season tickets go on sale next week

    The University of New Mexico athletic department announced that season tickets for the 2010-11 men’s basketball season will go on sale Tuesday.

    The UNM Lobos, whose roster includes former Los Alamos Hilltopper standout Alex Kirk, have 18 home games scheduled for this season. Games at the newly renovated University Arena (The Pit) include a pair of exhibitions, eight non-conference contests and the Mountain West slate.

  • The power of public-private partnerships

    Tucumcari for the first time. Other than a few lawyers’ offices, its lifeless main street was a canyon of vacant storefronts and hollow buildings.
    A Kmart had opened on the outskirts of town, and one business after another abandoned downtown to be close to the action. The only retail was a place that sold Bully Bags, little bags made of bulls’ testicles, and business wasn’t exactly booming.
    Other than the Bully Bags, Tucumcari’s scene was playing out in many small towns.

  • Mud-splattered voters will decide

    During his 1848 run for president, Gen. Zachary Taylor was pilloried as “a military autocrat,” “semi-illiterate,” “a cruel slavemaster,” “greedy” and given to cussing out underlings.

    Old Zach subsequently groused that he had been besmirched by “the vilest slanders of the most unprincipled demagogues this or any other nation was ever cursed with…”