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Public Safety

  • Police Beat 07-12-11

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt.

    June 30

    9:36 a.m. – A 32-year-old Santa Fe woman reported that she was assaulted on Trinity Drive.

    July 3

    12:51 a.m. – Lesley Cort, 18, of Los Alamos was arrested at Overlook Park and charged with criminal trespassing.

    1:06 p.m. – A 63-year-old Los Alamos woman reported that someone broke into her home in the 1400 block of Big Rock Loop. The estimated loss is unknown.

  • LANL Completes Critical Flood and Erosion Control Work

    Los Alamos National Laboratory work crews over the weekend installed 600 feet of water diversion barriers and removed  more than 1,200 cubic yards of sediment in anticipation of flash flooding because of damage from the Las Conchas Fire.

    It’s the first phase of additional work to help stabilize canyons that run through LANL property and minimize the ability of flood waters to stir up trace levels of Cold War-era contaminants in canyon bottoms.

    Although the fire burned only one acre of lab property, it charred parts of two major canyons upstream.  The lack of vegetation and a water-repelling crust on the burned areas could allow storm water to rush down-canyon instead of soak in. 

  • Flash Flood Watch in effect through Tuesday evening

    This from the National Weather Service:

    FLASH FLOOD WATCH NOW IN EFFECT THROUGH TUESDAY EVENING...

    THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS NOW IN EFFECT FOR

    * A PORTION OF NORTH AND CENTRAL NEW MEXICO... INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS... JEMEZ MOUNTAINS... SOUTHERN SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS ABOVE 9500 FEET... SOUTHWEST MOUNTAINS AND WEST SLOPES SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS. THE BIGGEST RISK AREAS ARE THE RECENT WILDFIRE BURN SCARS.

    * THROUGH TUESDAY EVENING

  • Alert: Terrorists look to implant bombs in humans

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines are being warned by the government that terrorists are considering surgically hiding bombs inside humans to evade airport security. And as a result, travelers may find themselves subjected to more scrutiny when flying in the heart of summer vacation season, especially to the U.S. from abroad.

    Bombs-in-the body is not a brand new idea, but recent intelligence indicates a fresh interest in using this method, as people-scanning machines in airports aren't able to detect explosives hidden inside humans. Still, there is no current information that points to a specific plot involving surgically implanted explosives, a U.S. security official said, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss such sensitive matters.

  • Seven year old child hit by car

    A seven-year-old Los Alamos girl was hit by a car as she crossed Central Avenue near Ashley Pond shortly before noon Wednesday.

    The child was transported to Los Alamos Medical Center “alert and conscious,” according to police.

    Deputy Chief Kevin Purtymun said this morning that she was treated and released.

    Following an investigation into the accident, Purtymun said the driver would not be cited.

    “The child wasn’t in the cross walk and stepped out from behind a parked SUV,” he said. “The driver was going slow enough to stop and not make this accident a tragedy.”

    Carol A. Clark

     

  • Weather contributes to Los Alamos fire behavior

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (AP) — Fire crews continue reinforcing fire lines and implementing structure protection plans for the west side of Los Alamos. The Las Conchas Fire has burned nearly 131,000 acres and is 30 percent contained.

    The Forest Service says hot, dry weather Tuesday resulted in extreme fire behavior. Large plumes of smoke were visible from the communities of Santa Clara, Chicoma Mountain, Los Alamos, Pajarito Mountain Ski Area and surrounding areas.

    Fire officials say the communities were not threatened as the smoke and flames remained within the fire perimeter.

    Pilots also reported 300 to 500 foot flames moving up the Polvadera Peak.

  • Former hotshot's perspective on Las Conchas Fire

    As a former hotshot, I just wanted to give a little perspective and credit to some people that often get overlooked. This is no way meant to take credit away from anyone. Bless the efforts of the entire town in our second run in with fire. This is a very brief summary.

    One of last, true, dirty, gritty, gun-slinging job in the United States is that of a wildland firefighter. These firefighters slip into the community as a shadow, relatively unnoticed and unconcerned with the spotlight eyes of the media. During fires such as the one we have witnessed, these wildland firefighters set up an entire “tent” city in the midst of disaster for command and control.  

  • County issues safety precautions for returning residents

    Following reopening of the townsite at 8 a.m.this morning Los Alamos County officials announced the following safety and recovery measures.

    Returning Residents Asked to Stay Home.  As the repopulation of the townsite continues throughout the day, residents who have arrived back at their homes are asked to avoid driving for 4-8 hours.  This minimizes overall traffic on main and side streets, to improve safety and efficient traffic flows for those just returning. Residents are also reminded to refrain from leaving valuables out in their driveway unattended to prevent thefts.

  • Public packs briefing in White Rock

    Los Alamos Fire Chief Doug Tucker assured a crowd of about 600 people packed into the White Rock Baptist Church Wednesday that their homes would be safe from the destruction caused by the Las Conchas Fire.

    Tucker and a host of Los Alamos County officials, along with Gov. Susana Martinez and representatives from Los Alamos National Laboratory provided information and answered questions from White Rock residents and Los Alamos evacuees.

    Tucker said the fire crews battling the Las Conchas blaze near Los Alamos were performing very well. He minced no words about whether the fire would reach homes in Los Alamos.

  • Putting a 'face' on the fire

    Parked just outside the evacuee shelter at the Cities of Gold Casino is a tractor trailer with two large satellite dishes on top. This vehicle, provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is serving as a remote “spike” station for Incident Commander Joe Reinarz’ Type I Incident Management Team,

    “FEMA has made it possible for us to operate beyond perfect,” said Information Officer Joe Helmich.
    “A spike is designed to take care of significant issues that are not necessarily treatable at the incident command location,” Helmich said. The incident command location is at Jemez Springs. “All of their operations can be duplicated at a remote location such as this.”