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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • LANL boss set to retire

    If Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Mike Anastasio had his way, Wednesday would be his final leadership breakfast as director.

    And the heavy hitters were in town to celebrate the occasion. Gov. Susana Martinez made her second trip to Los Alamos since being elected. And National Nuclear Security Administration’s director Thomas D’Agostino made the trip from Washington.

    A couple of months ago, Anastasio announced he was going to retire in June.

    On Wednesday, he said that was still his goal.

  • LANL, community groups reach water settlement

    Los Alamos National Laboratory announced it has reached a settlement with nine community groups and individuals that will result in the dismissal of a 2008 environmental lawsuit on Thursday.

    The suit, filed by the Western Environmental Law Center in Taos, alleged that LANL violated its EPA Clean Water Act permit, and allowed stormwater bearing contaminants from more than 100 legacy (Cold War era) environmental sites to run off at levels above standards —charges LANL denies.

    Under the terms of the settlement, WELC agreed to drop the lawsuit in exchange for access to inspect certain sites, funding for technical consulting and a portion of legal fees.

  • Governor visits Los Alamos

    Gov. Susana Martinez spent Wednesday morning visiting the Hill.

  • Lab accounts for $3 billion to state economy

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is crucial to New Mexico’s economic health, creating a $2.9 billion impact on the state’s economy and supporting about 24,000 jobs, according to a new University of New Mexico study.

    In fiscal year 2009, the Lab directly injected $1.6 billion into New Mexico’s economy, with an additional $1.3 billion resulting from indirect economic spending.  The indirect impacts are the ripple effect of LANL vendors purchasing goods and services and LANL employees and vendors’ employees spending their earnings in the region.  UNM calculated the Lab’s economic impact based on employee compensation, purchases of goods and services, construction expenditures, taxes, and other outlays.

  • LA middle schooler wins supercomputer challenge

    Los Alamos Middle School student Cole Kendrick captured the top prize in the 21st New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. For his research project, “Computer Simulation of Dark Matter Effects on Galaxy Rotation,” Kendrick developed a computer program to model the rotation of a galaxy including dark matter in an attempt to answer these questions:

    • How does dark matter affect rotational curves in galaxies?

    • How accurately this effect can be modeled?

    • What happens when the dark matter and galaxy masses are changed?

    • How well would this method work for different galaxies?

    Kendrick received a check for $1,000.

  • Students descend on LANL for computing challenge

    More than 200 New Mexico students and their teachers will gather at Los Alamos National Laboratory Monday and Tuesday for judging and an awards ceremony in the 21st annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge.

    About 50 teams of students from elementary, middle and high schools are expected at the Expo, said David Kratzer of the laboratory’s High Performance Computer Systems group and the lab’s coordinator of the Supercomputing Challenge.

    While at Los Alamos, students will present their projects and take part in tours, talks and demonstrations with laboratory scientists and researchers. Student projects will be recognized during an awards ceremony from 9 to 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive.

  • NNSA issues impact statement in advance of court challenge

    Late Friday afternoon, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) made available online the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the Nuclear Facility portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    “The NNSA is committed to carrying out our national security missions in a safe, secure and environmentally responsible manner,” DOE spokeswoman Toni Chiri said. “The CMRR project is an important part of our effort to invest in the future, build a 21st century nuclear security enterprise, implement the President’s nuclear security agenda, and improve the way NNSA does business.

  • CMRR Draft Supplemental EIS available online

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has announced that the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear Facility portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory is now available online.
     
    The CMRR would replace the 60-year-old Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building used for analytical chemistry and materials characterization critical to NNSA national security missions that require nuclear materials handling, processing and fabrication including stockpile management, nonproliferation and counterterrorism.
     

  • Cheaper hydrogen fuel cells close to reality

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a way to avoid the use of expensive platinum in hydrogen fuel cells, the environmentally friendly devices that might replace current power sources in everything from personal data devices to automobiles.
    In a paper published today in Science, Los Alamos researchers Gang Wu, Christina Johnston, and Piotr Zelenay, joined by researcher Karren More of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, describe the use of a platinum-free catalyst in the cathode of a hydrogen fuel cell.
    Eliminating platinum — a precious metal more expensive than gold — would solve a significant economic challenge that has thwarted widespread use of large-scale hydrogen fuel cell systems.  

  • LANL statistician receives Governor's Award

    The New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women selected Los Alamos National Laboratory research statistician Christine Anderson-Cook as one of 20 women to receive the 26th Annual Governor’s Award for Outstanding New Mexico Women.
    An awards banquet is scheduled for May 6 at the Hotel Albuquerque.
    “We are extremely proud of Christine’s accomplishments, both as an outstanding research statistician and as an excellent role model for women in science,” said Computer, Computational and Statistical Sciences Division Leader Stephen Lee.