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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • LANL attracts 1,350 students

    Los Alamos National Laboratory this summer attracted 1,350 student interns in both technical and nontechnical fields, giving them the opportunity to conduct research in a wide range of disciplines. In addition, a record number of postdocs – 452–are working at Los Alamos this year.
    “Diverse people, new ideas, excellent work, that’s what the lab is about,” said Jerry Foropoulos, Jr. of High Explosives Science and Technology Division, a judge for the Laboratory’s 2011 Student Symposium, an event that showcases students’ summer projects.

  • Pa. school to launch STEM initiative with LANL help

    Speaking at the 2011 Pittsburgh STEM Summit, Nick Trombetta, CEO of Pennsylvania’s largest cyber charter school, will discuss his school’s plans to launch a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) initiative in the Pittsburgh area.
    Trombetta is head of the Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School. He and three other leading educators are to discuss regional efforts to improve science and math education for grades K-12. The STEM Summit was held Wednesday.

  • NNSA Issues Final SEIS for Nuclear Facility Part of CMRR project

    The National Nuclear Security Administration announced Friday it was moving forward with its plans for the nuclear facility portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project (CMRR) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The NNSA posted the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) on the DOE NEPA website.

    The timing of the release of the impact statement – late Friday afternoon – did not go unnoticed by critics.

    "It is unlikely that the agency will receive any significant negative publicity for such stunts, as most news reporters who cover NNSA expect such behavior,” said Greg Mello, the director of the Los Alamos Study Group.

  • Salazar named LANL's tribal relations liaison


    Earl Salazar is Los Alamos National Laboratory’s new tribal liaison in the Government Affairs Office.
    Previously a budget analyst for LANL’s Chief Financial Officer Division, Salazar began working in his new capacity on Monday.
    Salazar succeeds Elmer Torres, who retired after 41 years of service, the last decade of which he was involved with LANL’s tribal affairs efforts.
    “Earl brings to his new position broad and deep tribal government experience with the Native American community of New Mexico and significant business and finance expertise from more than two decades working in the office of the LANL Chief Financial Officer,” said Government Affairs Office Director Patrick Woehrle.

  • Lab hits new magnetic field mark

    Researchers at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory’s Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory have set a new world record for the strongest magnetic field produced by a nondestructive magnet.
    The scientists achieved a field of 92.5 tesla on Thursday, August 18, taking back a record that had been held by a team of German scientists and then, the following day, surpassed their achievement with a 97.4-tesla field. For perspective, Earth’s magnetic field is 0.0004 tesla, while a junk-yard magnet is 1 tesla and a medical MRI scan has a magnetic field of 3 tesla.

  • Copper thieves target federal sites

    A worldwide shortage has sparked copper thieves to steal wiring from anywhere they can find it including local telephone poles. Reports also indicate that about 30,000 pounds of copper was been stolen from the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Copper thefts at LANL actually have involved a few pounds up to a few hundred pounds from salvage, spokesman Kevin Roark said this morning.

    “We are looking in to this but our initial estimates indicate the actual number to be significantly less than the 30,000 pounds,” Roark said. “We have not experienced any significant copper theft since 2009 … There were a couple of incidents in 2006 and 2007 … all allegations were referred to local and federal law enforcement at the time.”

  • Lab provides update on permit request

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory wants to remove the interim tag from two sites where it houses open detonation units. And in its permit modification request to the New Mexico Environment Department, the lab also wants to close two of its sites.

    At Fuller Lodge Tuesday night, lab experts conducted a public meeting, which is a requirement of the permit modification request.

    The public can submit comments to NMED until Sept. 19. After that, NMED will review the permit application and respond to public comments before issuing a final decision.

  • Thomas named ACS Fellow

    Kimberly Thomas, director of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Science and Technology Base Programs Office, has become the first Los Alamos researcher to be named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
    The ACS created the Fellows program to “recognize members of ACS for outstanding achievements in, and contributions to, Science, the Profession and the Society.” Fellows are selected for demonstrable excellence in the chemical sciences and outstanding service to the society.
    Thomas has served as member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Improving Practices for Regulating and Managing Low-Activity Radioactive Waste, and as Division and Program Chair of ACS’s Nuclear Chemistry and Technology division.

  • Scientists spy on ions using neutrons

    A Los Alamos National Laboratory research team has harnessed neutrons to view for the first time the critical role that an elusive molecule plays in certain biological reactions. The effort could aid in treatment of peptic ulcers or acid reflux disease, or allow for more efficient conversion of woody waste into transportation fuels.
    In a paper appearing this week in Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Los Alamos researchers join an international team in describing the role played by the elusive hydronium ion in the transfer of protons during enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  • Two LANL meetings scheduled

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory will hold two public meetings in the next six days.
    At 5:30 tonight at Fuller Lodge, LANL will host an informational meeting, regarding the Hazardous Waste Permit Modification Request for the planned Transuranic Waste Facility. This meeting was originally scheduled for June 27 but was postponed because of the Las Conchas Fire.
    LANL will submit a request to the New  Mexico Environment Department to operate a transuranic waste container storage facility at Technical Area 63. The facility would replace current storage facilities at TA-54. The meeting will describe the planned facility and the permit modification system.