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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • NNSA reaches pact to produce Mo-99

    The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative announced today the signing of a cooperative agreement with NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC, to further the development of accelerator-based technology to produce molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) in the United States.
    The cooperative agreement between NNSA and NorthStar, which totals $4.6 million and is funded under a 50 percent/50 percent cost-share arrangement, will accelerate the development of the NorthStar technology to produce Mo-99 without proliferation-sensitive highly enriched uranium (HEU). The agreement would also support the goal of ensuring a reliable domestic supply of this critical medical isotope for U.S. patients.

  • Lab releases 2010 environmental report

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory recently released its 2010 Environmental Report.
    The annual update is 412 pages and the Los Alamos Monitor did a quick review and here are some of the highlights.

  • Antibody project could unlock mysteries

    A National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division could help unravel the gnarly secrets of how many human genes function.
    Originally discovered in the Human Genome Project, the approximately 20,000 genes of the human body have been slow to reveal their exact roles. And one of the best tools for exposing a gene’s function is to take the protein it produces and generate specific antibodies, usually by vaccinating mice or rabbits. Antibodies are specialized proteins the immune system deploys to block the actions of potentially harmful bacteria and viruses.

  • Leadership New Mexico

    LANL Director Charlie McMillan, and Roger Waterman of TRK Management and Kurt Steinhaus from the lab’s Community Programs Office chat during Thursday night’s Leadership New Mexico event at the Bradbury Science Museum.

  • LANL wins cyber security award

    The SANS Institute announced Monday that Los Alamos National Laboratory has won the 2011 U.S. National Cybersecurity Innovation Award for their innovative use of vShield and other defense tools that represent a breakthrough model for securing virtual computing and private cloud deployments. As federal agencies and commercial organizations move quickly to take advantage of cloud computing, they are also concerned about the increasing risk of cyber-attacks.

  • Livermore gets new director

    Penrose “Parney” C. Albright has been named the director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Norman J. Pattiz, chairman of Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), which manages the lab for the U.S. Department of Energy, made the announcement Oct. 27.
    The appointment takes effect Dec. 1. Albright also will serve as president of LLNS.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan knows Albright and is looking forward to working with him.
    “He got to Livermore after I left,” McMillan said Thursday night before the R&D Awards ceremony at the Best Western Hilltop Hotel. “We’ve interacted on global security issues and he will be great to work with.”

  • Second suit filed to block CMRR

    It looks like the issue of the $5.8 billion Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility will be spending more time in the court room.

    The Los Alamos Study Group has filed a second lawsuit against the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Friday morning,

    The Study Group, under Greg Mello, filed the suit under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) “seeking accurate, up-to-date analyses of the feasibility and impacts of alternatives to a proposed $6 billion plutonium building at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).”

    Spokesperson Toni Chiri said the NNSA has not seen the suit yet and does not comment on pending litigation.

  • Spinoff receives NIH grant for device

    A spinoff of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mesa Tech, has been awarded a $300,000 Phase I Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institutes of Health. The grant will allow Mesa Tech to develop an inexpensive, instrument-free, nucleic-acid testing device able to diagnose various respiratory diseases in record time.
    The managers of Mesa Tech, who are currently developing a prototype, plan to initially target the global diseases surveillance market. They also envision applications in point-of-care diagnostics, particularly in poor areas of the world, said former LANL scientist Hong Cai, who co-founded Mesa Tech and is the principal investigator for the effort benefitting from the grant.

  • LANL celebrates International Year of Chemistry

    In order to bring attention to and celebrate the achievements of chemistry and its contributions to civilization, the General Assembly of the United Nations passed a resolution declaring 2011 as the International Year of Chemistry.

    The year 2011 was selected because it coincides with the 100th anniversary of Marie Curie’s Nobel Prize in chemistry and the 100th anniversary of the founding of the International Association of Chemical Societies (now IUPAC, the International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry).

    The Chemistry Division and Los Alamos National Laboratory are doing their part.

    They are celebrating the International Year of Chemistry through a series of activities, lectures, and events, many of which are open to the public.

  • Lab gets help in saving water

    A project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will provide the resources that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) triple the lab’s capacity to save water.

    The upgrade of LANL’s Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF), a $16.1 million project, meets a Department of Energy and NNSA requirement for recycling water and reducing the consumption of potable water use. The 4,350-square-foot facility treats effluent water from LANL’s sanitary sewer system and meets a standard equivalent to drinking water which is ultimately recycled for industrial reuse. Using treated sanitary effluent in the cooling towers reduces LANL’s use of potable water, derived from the regional aquifer, for such purposes.