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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Expect delays on truck route

    Drilling operations to affect traffic on the LANL Truck Route
     
    A new groundwater well is scheduled to be drilled on the north side of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Truck Route beginning Saturday, and drivers headed to and from the lab should be aware of trucks turning onto and off the roadway in that area.
     The point for trucks entering and exiting the roadway corresponds to where the passing lane begins, about a mile east of the laboratory security force firing range, or just over two miles from the junction of the Truck Route with State Road 4.  
     Drivers coming down the hill should be especially careful to observe posted speed limits and watch for traffic slowdowns.

  • Gov. discusses waste shipment process

    Gov. Susana Martinez and New Mexico Environment Department Secretary David Martin met Tuesday with senior U.S. Department of Energy officials to discuss high priority issues for the ongoing environmental clean-up efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    The meeting served as an opportunity for Martinez to meet Don Cook, deputy administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration’s defense programs, David Huizenga, Acting Assistant Secretary for DOE’s Office of Environmental Management. Los Alamos Site Office Manager Kevin Smith, Deputy Assistant Secretary Frank Marcinowski of the Office of Regulatory Compliance and Assistant Manager for Environment George Rael at LASO also participated in the meeting.

  • Lujan urges lab to contract more small businesses

    Congressman Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico’s Third District drafted a letter to New Mexico’s national laboratories and military bases today urging them to contract more with New Mexico-headquartered businesses in order to encourage business opportunities in the state.
    The letter was sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory. Similar letters were also sent to Sandia National Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, Cannon Air Force Base, Holloman Air Force Base, and the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  • Lab to host LDRD Day Tuesday at Buffalo Thunder

    Some of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s scientists will explain and present their work to the public Tuesday during LANL’s third annual LDRD Day.
    The event is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Buffalo Thunder Resort near Pojoaque.
    The event is free and open to the public, and provides an opportunity for people to see some of the most exciting research currently under way at the Laboratory.

  • Lab: Detonations needed to get rid of explosive waste

     In a desolate canyon in northern New Mexico, a black puff of dust and smoke rises up from the ground following a quick flash. It takes about a second and a half for the loud boom and rush of air to catch up.
    Explosives experts at the nation’s premiere nuclear laboratory just blew up 85 pounds of waste left over from some of the experiments Los Alamos National Laboratory conducts on improvised explosives and other terrorist threats.
    Some of the high explosive waste also comes from the work scientists do to bolster national security and to ensure the stability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile.
    Critical is how lab officials describe the work — and the detonations needed to get rid of the waste.

  • LANL attracts 1,350 students

    Los Alamos National Laboratory this summer attracted 1,350 student interns in both technical and nontechnical fields, giving them the opportunity to conduct research in a wide range of disciplines. In addition, a record number of postdocs – 452–are working at Los Alamos this year.
    “Diverse people, new ideas, excellent work, that’s what the lab is about,” said Jerry Foropoulos, Jr. of High Explosives Science and Technology Division, a judge for the Laboratory’s 2011 Student Symposium, an event that showcases students’ summer projects.

  • Pa. school to launch STEM initiative with LANL help

    Speaking at the 2011 Pittsburgh STEM Summit, Nick Trombetta, CEO of Pennsylvania’s largest cyber charter school, will discuss his school’s plans to launch a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) initiative in the Pittsburgh area.
    Trombetta is head of the Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School. He and three other leading educators are to discuss regional efforts to improve science and math education for grades K-12. The STEM Summit was held Wednesday.

  • NNSA Issues Final SEIS for Nuclear Facility Part of CMRR project

    The National Nuclear Security Administration announced Friday it was moving forward with its plans for the nuclear facility portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project (CMRR) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The NNSA posted the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) on the DOE NEPA website.

    The timing of the release of the impact statement – late Friday afternoon – did not go unnoticed by critics.

    "It is unlikely that the agency will receive any significant negative publicity for such stunts, as most news reporters who cover NNSA expect such behavior,” said Greg Mello, the director of the Los Alamos Study Group.

  • Salazar named LANL's tribal relations liaison


    Earl Salazar is Los Alamos National Laboratory’s new tribal liaison in the Government Affairs Office.
    Previously a budget analyst for LANL’s Chief Financial Officer Division, Salazar began working in his new capacity on Monday.
    Salazar succeeds Elmer Torres, who retired after 41 years of service, the last decade of which he was involved with LANL’s tribal affairs efforts.
    “Earl brings to his new position broad and deep tribal government experience with the Native American community of New Mexico and significant business and finance expertise from more than two decades working in the office of the LANL Chief Financial Officer,” said Government Affairs Office Director Patrick Woehrle.

  • Lab hits new magnetic field mark

    Researchers at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory’s Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory have set a new world record for the strongest magnetic field produced by a nondestructive magnet.
    The scientists achieved a field of 92.5 tesla on Thursday, August 18, taking back a record that had been held by a team of German scientists and then, the following day, surpassed their achievement with a 97.4-tesla field. For perspective, Earth’s magnetic field is 0.0004 tesla, while a junk-yard magnet is 1 tesla and a medical MRI scan has a magnetic field of 3 tesla.