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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • NM Homeland Security director going to LANL

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's Homeland Security and Emergency Management Secretary Michael Duvall is stepping down to take a job at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Duvall, a retired Air Force commander who made $103,000 with the state, will become assistant manager for safeguards and security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Office. His last day with the state is Jan. 29.

    Duvall has been in the job since Gov. Susana Martinez took office last January. During that year, he oversaw the state's responses to several crises, including the last winter's cold freeze and natural gas outage and last summer's record-setting fire season, which saw the largest wildfire in state history threaten Los Alamos.

  • Lab, Malaysia collaborate on dwarfism

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Centre for Chemical Biology at Universiti Sains Malaysia (CCB@USM) have launched a human genome project to study an individual with achondroplasia disorder, the most common form of dwarfism.
    The project began with the dream of Malaysian graduate student Ling Sze Lee to answer the question “Why am I different?”

  • Students avoid LANL budget cutbacks

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Integrated Stewardship made some decisions regarding its student hiring process, according to the lab’s internal website this week.

    The LISC, which is trying to make financial decisions in order to achieve $200 million in savings across the lab, announced it would not be mandating specific cuts to the number of students or require a specific cost reduction to student programs.

  • Eight researchers named APS Fellows

    The American Physical Society (APS) has selected eight LANL scientists as 2011 Fellows. The APS is a nonprofit organization working to advance the knowledge of physics through its research journals, scientific meetings, outreach, advocacy, and international activities.
    It represents 48,000 members worldwide, including physicists in academia, national laboratories, and industry. Only half of one percent of APS members can be elected to Fellowship yearly.
    And the new APS Fellows are:
    • Michael (Misha) Chertkov of Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems: “For fundamental theoretical contributions in statistical hydrodynamics and physics of information and algorithms.”

  • Nanotube 'glow sticks' transform science tool kit


    Many physical and chemical processes necessary for biology and chemistry occur at the interface of water and solid surfaces. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory publishing in Nature Nanotechnology have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes — light emitting cylinders of pure carbon — have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water.
    Using high-speed microscopic imaging, they found that nanotubes could both detect and track the motion of individual molecules as they bombard the surface at the water interface.
    Traditional techniques to investigate molecules on surfaces cannot be used in water because the study requires low-pressure atmospheres such as one finds in space.

  • LANL's Anderson-Cook honored

    Christine Anderson-Cook of Los Alamos National Laboratory was recently selected as a Fellow of the American Society for Quality, or ASQ.
    Anderson-Cook, who works in the Statistical Sciences Group at LANL, was recognized for research in quality in the areas of design of experiments and reliability, for interdisciplinary collaboration and training of statistical thinking and quality ideas, and for dedicated service to the growth and practice of the quality profession.
    ASQ Fellows are recognized based on their pre-eminence in technology, theory, education, or the application or management of quality control. ASQ Fellows represent diverse industries on a global scale.

  • Five honored as LANL Fellows for 2011

    Five scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory have been honored by Laboratory Director Charles McMillan as Laboratory Fellows.
    Laboratory Fellows are honored for their sustained, high-level achievements in programs of importance to the laboratory either a fundamental or important discovery that has led to widespread use or and having become a recognized authority in the field, including outside recognition and an outstanding record of publications.

  • NNSA issues order of intent

    The U.S. Department of Energy intends to modify the scope of the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS) and to conduct additional public scoping in Northern New Mexico.
    DOE published the Notice of Intent today in the Federal Register and it is available online at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-12/pdf/2012-445.pdf.
    The public scoping meeting is scheduled for 5:30-8 p.m., Feb. 2, at the Cities of Gold Hotel.

  • Lab outlines priority cleanup goals

    Lab officials are calling it the “LANL 3,706 Transuranic Waste Campaign.”

    Why the 3,706?

    Their goal is to remove 3,706 cubic meters of TRU waste by June 30, 2014 from Technical Area 54 and Material Disposal Area G.

    So how much is 3,706 cubic meters?

    It’s a lot. A cubic meter is a unit of measurement for volume. The 3,706 cubic meters translates to roughly 130,876.154 cubic feet.

    Dan Cox, the deputy associate director for Environmental Programs at the lab, told the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board that the waste is classified into three categories. Seventy percent of the waste is in oversized containers, 20 percent are in drums and 10 percent are in standard waste boxes.

  • Lab, NMED reach cleanup pact

    George Rael, the assistant manager for environmental programs at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office, admitted to the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board Thursday what a fair amount of people already surmised.

    “It’s not possible for DOE to meet the Consent Order in 2015,” Rael told the group assembled for the meeting at the Cities of Gold Hotel Conference Center.

    Rael said budget cuts, technical challenges and a shift in priorities have caused the lack of progress on cleanup.

    The New Mexico Environment Department, however, said it was not changing the deadline.