.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraviolet

    A multinational team of scientists has developed a process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range.
    The work, reported this week in the online Nature Communications, is a step toward biomedical devices with active components made from nanostructured systems.
    LEDs based on solution-processed inorganic nanocrystal have promise for use in environmental and biomedical diagnostics, because they are cheap to produce, robust, and chemically stable. But development has been hampered by the difficulty of achieving ultraviolet emission.

  • Senator questions DOE commitment

    The Regional Coalition of LANL Communities met with Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) and Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM) and other representatives of the New Mexico Congressional delegation Friday in Santa Fe to discuss budget cuts at the lab.

    After the meeting, Bingaman released a letter that he sent to Energy Secretary Steven Chu, requesting a meeting to discuss the deferment of the CMRR project and the news that LANL was instituting a workforce reduction program that would eliminate 400 to 800 jobs.

  • Lab ratchets up security

    People traveling through Los Alamos National Laboratory property to get to popular hiking and hot spring destinations may find their vehicles subject to random searches by lab authorities.

    That’s the latest from LANL Security and Safeguards Associate Director Michael Lansing who revealed the plan Thursday to Los Alamos business leaders.

    “I think it is the right thing to do given the threats on campus,” he said adding that he didn’t have knowledge of any specific threats.

    Lansing said he anticipates the lab will begin the searches next month and will require passengers, should they consent to the search, to exit the vehicle while a guard does a visual check and a security dog sniffs out the vehicle.

  • Random vehicle checks

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Security and Safeguards Associate Director Michael Lansing spoke to business leaders this morning about a new measure to conduct random vehicle checks on people entering lab property. Some business owners voiced concerns over the impact the stepped up security may have on tourism in the Atomic City. See more on this story in Friday’s Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Research: More grapes, less wrath

    A team of researchers has found a way to ensure that your evening glass of wine will continue to be available, despite the potential attack of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), a bacterium that causes Pierce’s Disease and poses a significant threat to the California wine industry’s valuable grapevines.

    Researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), University of California at Davis (UCD), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service have created specially engineered grapevines that produce a hybrid antimicrobial protein that can block Xf infection.

  • Fallout continues from CMRR: Legislative decision leaves more questions than answers in Los Alamos

    It’s been a long week for those involved with the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility.

    And the extent of the fallout remains uncertain.

    Lab director Charlie McMillan has scheduled an all-hands meeting for LANL employees Tuesday to discuss the CMRR project, which was deferred for five years after the funding was yanked in the President’s FY13 budget request.

    The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce has become involved in an attempt to figure out the impact on several businesses and subcontractors.

  • Fallout continues from CMRR: Protesting and lobbying helped turn the tide in Washington

    Depending on how one looks at it, the activists can take credit and/or the blame for the decision that will defer construction of the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement.

    On Monday, the President’s FY 13 budget zeroed out funding for the project.

    Throughout the process critics showed up in force at the various public comment meetings throughout the state.

    With the exception of the Los Alamos meeting, at least 40 to 50 people spoke out against the project.

    And a lot of those same people headed to Washington to lobby Congress.

    Greg Mello of the Los Alamos Study Group has been to Washington three times and also New York once this year.

  • LANL selects small businesses for nuke waste services

    Los Alamos National Laboratory today announced it has selected four small businesses to compete for up to $200 million in services related to safely packaging Cold War-era wastes for final disposal.
    The companies—Environmental Dimensions, Inc.; North Wind, Inc.; Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; and Portage, Inc.—will now use a streamlined process to bid for a number of individual tasks under this “master task order agreement.”  
    Tasks include such activities as handling waste containers, transporting them to licensed disposal facilities, and providing verification and certification of delivery.

  • Reaction continues to ripple from CMRR decision

    The National Nuclear Security Administration further clarified its position on deferring the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility for at least five years.

    NNSA spokesperson Josh McConaha issued the following statement: “NNSA has taken steps to ensure the nation has a capabilities-based nuclear security enterprise focused on needs and solutions. We view this constrained budget environment as an additional incentive to ask ourselves how we can re-think the way we’re operating, how we can innovate, and how we can get better.

  • NNSA, labs need to mend fences

    Scientists and engineers at the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) three national security laboratories appear committed to their work and core mission of maintaining the country’s nuclear weapons stockpile, but according to a new National Research Council  report, a “broken relationship” between NNSA and the labs threatens to erode the quality of the scientific research and engineering being conducted there.

    The committee that wrote the report said that an intrusive degree of oversight stemming from past security and safety concerns at one of the labs has led to a “breakdown of trust.”