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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Supercomputing challenge slated for this next week

    More than 200 New Mexico students and their teachers will convene at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 23 and 24 for judging and the awards ceremony in the 22nd annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge.

    More than 60 teams of students from elementary, middle, and high school are participating in the event, said David Kratzer of the Laboratory’s High Performance Computer Systems group and LANL’s coordinator of the Supercomputing Challenge.

    While at LANL, students will present their projects and take part in tours, talks, and demonstrations with Laboratory scientists and researchers. Student projects will be recognized during an awards ceremony from 9 to 11:30 a.m., April 24 at the Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive in Los Alamos.

  • LANL post-docs, staff members honored

    Three postdocs and six staff members will receive Postdoc Distinguished Performance and Postdoc Distinguished Mentor awards respectively at an invitation-only event April 25.
    Tanmoy Das, Nan Li and Nikolai Yampolsky are recipients of Postdoctoral Distinguished Performance awards, which recognize individual postdoctoral researchers or teams of no more than three postdoctoral researchers who have made an outstanding and unique contribution resulting in a positive, significant impact on the lab’s programmatic or organizational efforts, or status in the scientific community during the 2011 fiscal year.

  • Cyber exercise puts labs to test

    Intense pressure creates diamonds from coal, they say, and for Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory cyber security programs, it’s an apt comparison.

    Fending off thousands of computer attacks from around the world, controlling vast libraries of sensitive information, yet keeping the scientific flow of knowledge moving, cyber teams such as those at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and elsewhere in the government complex feel the squeeze.

  • Cancer Therapy Gets Boost From New Isotope--Video Extra

    A new medical isotope project at Los Alamos National Laboratory shows promise for rapidly producing major quantities of a new cancer-treatment agent, actinium 225 (Ac-225).

    Using proton beams, Los Alamos and its partner Brookhaven National Laboratory could match current annual worldwide production of the isotope in just a few days, solving critical shortages of this therapeutic isotope that attacks cancer cells. A collaboration between Los Alamos, Brookhaven, and Oak Ridge national laboratories is developing a plan for full-scale production and stable supply of Ac-225.

  • Dissecting NNSA’s evaluations

    Walter Pincus of the Washington Post has covered defense, intelligence and foreign policy for years.

    He knows better than most in how to read between the lines and getting to the top of a sensitive subject.

    In his latest blog, Pincus took a look at the National Nuclear Security Administration’s performance evaluations of the nation’s eight nuclear weapons laboratories and production facilities, including Los Alamos.

    In fact, it was Los Alamos that he put under his microscope.

  • Two lab employees honored

    The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) has selected John Carpenter of LANL’s Metallurgy and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies groups and Nathan Mara of the Lab’s Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies group to receive a 2012 TMS Young Leader Professional Development Award.
    The Society created the annual award to enhance the professional development of young people from the five technical divisions of TMS.
    Awardees participate in Society activities, attend TMS conferences, network with Society members and leaders, receive mentoring from TMS division leaders, and serve as judges for division-sponsored student events at the TMS Annual Meeting.

  • NNSA releases evaluation reports

    In the face of impending litigation, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) released the Performance Evaluation Reports for its eight nuclear weapons sites including Los Alamos Wednesday.

    On March 28, Nuclear Watch New Mexico filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit in federal court in Albuquerque.

    “These reports are the government’s scorecard for awarding tens of millions of dollars to nuclear weapons contractors, and were previously available to the public until 2009,” Nuclear Watch New Mexico’s Jay Coghlan said. “However, since that time the NNSA has withheld them in a general move toward less contractor accountability. We sought to help reverse that wrong direction through our litigation.”

  • Final workday at lab for 557 who took VSP

    For the 557 employees who decided to take the voluntary separation program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, today was the final day of work.

    “I would like to thank each and every employee who volunteered for the program,” said LANL Director Charlie McMillan. “Some of them devoted their entire careers to serving the nation during a truly historic time for the country and the lab. They set the example that we will continue to follow.”

    McMillan said during an all-employee meeting last week that LANL will not file an involuntary separation plan for the regular workforce this fiscal year.

  • Environmental data now viewable by the public

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s database of environmental monitoring data is now directly viewable by the public.

    “Intellus New Mexico,” the new, web-based application, will display the same internal data that Laboratory scientists and regulatory agencies see and use for environmental analysis and monitoring of the LANL site.  The new system contains more than 9 million records, including historical data as well as a near-real-time view of ongoing data collection activities.

    Intellus NM replaces an older database of lab-related environmental data, known as RACER.

  • GAO makes recommendations

    The Government Accountability Office weighed in on the deferred Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement project this week and according to its report, costs will escalate even more if the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration decide to proceed with the project down the road.

    According to its most recent estimates prepared in April 2010, NNSA determined that the CMRR will cost between $3.7 billion and $5.8 billion — nearly a six-fold increase from the initial estimate.