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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • It’s decision time at LANL

    A fair amount of Los Alamos National Laboratory employees have either made or about to make some big decisions concerning their livelihoods in the coming week.

    Eligible employees have until Wednesday to decide whether to take a voluntary separation package.

    From March 15-19, employees will have the opportunity to rescind their decision. On March 26, employees will be notified if their application has been accepted. April 5 will be the final day for those employees, who have opted to take the buyout.

    So do they take it or not?

  • Historic, unique Manhattan Project footage from Los Alamos

    In 1943, the top scientists from the United States and other nations gathered in Los Alamos, NM for the Manhattan Project. Among them was physicist Hugh Bradner. With informal permission from the U.S. Army, he shot a collection of home movies of life in a place that officially didn't exist, and of people working on a project that ultimately changed history. His footage represents the only look at life in the Los Alamos area during that time. To read the story behind this footage, click here.

  • LANL names nuclear, high hazard ops head

    Following a national search, Charles Anderson has been selected as associate director for Nuclear and High Hazard Operations (ADNHHO).  Anderson has been in the acting role since July 2011. Prior to the acting position he served as the deputy associate director in ADNHHO.
    Anderson succeeds Bob McQuinn, who now works for URS Corporation.
    “Nothing is more important than the safety of our employees and the public, especially where nuclear and high hazard facilities are concerned,” said LANL Director Charlie McMillan.  “Charlie Anderson has both the credentials and the experience to make sure we continue to place a very high value on safety.”

  • Watson to discuss latest in imaging

    Los Alamos National Laboratory research and development engineer Scott Watson talks about the history of imaging technology and the relatively new fields of high-speed photography and flash radiography at a Frontiers in Science series talk at 7 p.m. Thursday (March 8) in the Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road N.W., Albuquerque.
    “Capturing the Light: Scientific Imaging in the Modern World” also showcases the world’s fastest movie camera called MOXIE, for Movies Of eXtreme Imaging Experiments.
    The shoe box-sized device makes movies at 20 million frames per second and won a prestigious 2010 R&D 100 award.

  • Lujan expresses concerns to Energy Secretary Chu

    Congressman Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico’s Third District expressed his concerns with budget cuts to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in a Science, Space, and Technology Committee hearing with Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu.
    Lujan brought up the deferment of the CMRR project and the workforce reduction at the lab along with the National Academies report warned that distrustful oversight by NNSA, in which individual transactions are reviewed at every step, is harming the vitality and long-term viability of the science and engineering capability at the labs.

  • LANL taps Pantex vet as head of plutonium operations

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Principal Associate Director for Weapons Programs Bret Knapp has announced the hiring of Jeff Yarbrough as the new Associate Director for Plutonium Science and Manufacturing (ADPSM).

    Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from the B&W Pantex plant in Amarillo, Texas, where he led the Pantex directed stockpile work (DSW) and weapons science campaigns.  During his DSW tenure, B&W Pantex earned the highest performance evaluation score in the history of the Pantex plant.

    His selection was the result of a national search.

  • LANL researchers to develop E. coli detection tools

    Researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New Mexico Consortium received a portion of a recent $25 million grant from the US Department of Agriculture to study E. coli in the beef industry.
    The USDA awarded the grant to this team of researchers to help reduce the occurrence and public health risks from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) along the entire beef production chain.
    The University of Nebraska-Lincoln are the principal investigators on the multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team of researchers, educators and extension specialists.  The LANL-NMC portion of the grant totals $1 million for three years.

  • Lab workers mull buyout details

    Severance packages of up to 39 weeks of pay will be offered as details emerged from director Charlie McMillan’s meeting Thursday with lab employees concerning the volunteer separation program.

    McMillan discussed specifics of the program during an all-hands meeting.

    The NNSA announced late Wednesday that it approved a plan that would cut 400 to 800 jobs from the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Eligible employees from the regular workforce of about 7,600 may begin applying for voluntary separation on March 5. According to a person who attended the meeting, employees can declare whether they are taking the package March 5-14.

  • NNSA boss talks CMRR

    In testimony before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development today, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Administrator Thomas D’Agostino outlined President Obama’s FY 2013 budget request, which gives NNSA the resources it needs to achieve the President’s nuclear security objectives, shape the future of nuclear security, and work to improve the way it does business.
    D’Agostino also outlined the reasoning behind deferring the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility for at least five years.

  • Lab unveils details on voluntary separation package

     

    Details emerged from director Charlie McMillan’s meeting this afternoon with lab employees concerning the  volunteer separation program.

    Lab director Charlie McMillan discussed specifics of the  program during an all-hands meeting Thursday.

    The NNSA announced late Wednesday that it approved a plan that would cut 400 to 800 jobs from the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Eligible employees from the regular workforce of about 7,600 may begin applying for voluntary separation on March 5. According to a person who attended the meeting, employees can declare whether they are taking the package between March 5-14.