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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • 557 take LANL buyout

    Officials were hoping between 400 and 800 employees would take the voluntary separation agreement.
    On Monday, Los Alamos National Laboratory announced that 557 employees will leave the lab as part of a voluntary separation program. The employees come from nearly all lab functions, excluding certain essential areas.
    The last day of work for those employees will be April 5.
    “I would like to thank each and every employee who volunteered for the program,” said LANL Director Charlie McMillan. “Some of them devoted their entire careers to serving the nation during a truly historic time for the country and the lab. They set the example that we will continue to follow.”

  • Coalition issues statement

    The Regional Coalition of LANL Communities released a statement following its press conference Friday in Santa Fe.
     “Adequate funding is needed to ensure environmental liabilities are addressed. Funding cuts are undermining DOE’s commitment to a safe and timely cleanup. The hazardous materials incident that occurred last week at TA-21 raises serious questions about the challenges that the site faces in remediating legacy waste and reinforces the urgent need to fund cleanup efforts.

  • Coalition: Fully fund lab cleanup

    The Regional Coalition of LANL Communities is calling on Congress to provide full funding to the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s toxic waste clean-up efforts.
    Members of the group recently returned from Washington, D.C., where they met with members of the New Mexico congressional delegation and federal Department of Energy officials to request adequate funding be provided as part of the fiscal year 2013 budget.

  • Lab reaches magnet milestone

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s biggest magnet facility Thursday met the grand challenge of producing magnetic fields in excess of 100 tesla, while conducting six different experiments.
    The 100-tesla level is roughly equivalent to two million times Earth’s magnetic field.
    “This is our moon shot, we’ve worked toward this for a decade and a half,” said Chuck Mielke, director of the Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos.

  • Details hazy on what triggered Hazmat incident

    More details have begun to emerge after a chemical reaction in a bottle containing liquid drawn from a 60-year-old cylinder at Los Alamos Laboratory’s Technical Area 21 caused lab officials to summon Hazmat personnel last week.

    A laboratory worker took a sample of the gas inside the bottle of liquid; a chemical reaction occurred that caused the material to flare briefly. Neither the worker nor anyone in the area was injured or exposed to hazardous chemicals, but the workers immediately employed standard emergency response procedures and called in the laboratory’s hazmat and emergency response personnel.

  • Community forum addresses budget cuts

    Terry Wallace, the principal associate director for global security at LANL, was the keynote speaker Wednesday night at Duane Smith Auditorium. It was the third community forum this week to discuss the volunteer separation programs at the lab.

  • Safety board assigns new rep to LANL

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board announced the assignment of Richard Verhaagen as Site Representative at the Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Verhaagen will replace Brett Broderick and join Todd Davis, the board’s current Site Representative at LANL, in July 2012.

    As a Site Representative, Verhaagen will advise the board on the overall safety conditions at LANL defense nuclear facilities and will participate in technical reviews by the board and its staff related to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities.

  • Lab alums could bolster business

    The UNM-Los Alamos Small Business Development Center will host two community forums on Thursday to provide LANL employees who are eligible for voluntary separation with information about opportunities and resources available to them.  

    The first forum will take place at the Los Alamos Research Park, 4200 West Jemez Road, in conference room #202A, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.  The second forum will be at The Hive, 134 State Road 4, in White Rock, 5:30-6:30 p.m.  

  • Site Office names deputy manager

    The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration today announced selection of Espanola native Juan Griego as Deputy Site Manager for the Los Alamos Site Office (LASO).

    Griego, who has served as deputy manager for the past seven months, will report to LASO Manager Kevin Smith.

    “I’m extremely pleased to have Juan as my deputy manager,” Smith said. “His breadth and depth of experience coupled with his skilled leadership will certainly help serve the Los Alamos Site Office well and contribute to the success of the laboratory.”

  • Businesses brace to take a hit

    POJOAQUE — An attempt at light humor from Los Alamos National Laboratory Executive Director Richard Marquez fell on deaf ears during a community forum Monday to discuss the lab’s budget slashing efforts.

    But one question from an attendee about how the lab’s cuts may affect the local economy set a dour tone for the night.

    Northern New Mexico businesses face losing more than $30 million, or a third, of lab contracts, Marquez said.

    And in addition to the highly publicized voluntary layoffs currently underway, the lab is also looking to cut $150 million in goods and services because of decreased revenue.

    At some point, there will be more expenditures than the budget has coming in, Marquez said.