.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • NNSA announces quarterly awards

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Programs today announced the recipients of the Defense Programs’ Employee of the Quarter Awards.
    And two entities with Los Alamos connections were honored.
    Jesús T. Romero, Los Alamos Site Office, is recognized for leading the site technical efforts to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (PF-4) safety basis and address the post-seismic fire accident scenario in a technically defensible manner.

  • Students build world's first experimental super computer

    Several local high school and undergraduate students including those from Los Alamos spent their summer assembling 2,500 computers at the  New Mexico Consortium to create the world’s largest large-scale, low-level  systems research facility.  Another group of students spent their recent winter break putting the system together.
    The National Science  Foundation-sponsored project, known as PRObE, will provide a highly reconfigurable, remotely accessible and controllable environment that  researchers anywhere in the world can use to perform experiments that are not  possible at a smaller scale.

  • LANL achieves wastewater milestone

    Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater will be recycled at Los  Alamos National Laboratory as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment.

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, which issues permits for industrial and sanitary wastewater discharges, recently approved the removal of four more outfalls from the Laboratory’s permit. (An outfall is where wastewater from Lab operations is discharged down canyons.)  Only 11 outfalls remain, down from 141 in 1993.

  • POGO: CMRR funding should be slashed

    The Project on Government Oversight (POGO) took a stick to the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement facility in its latest report released this week.

    The main premise of the report is that Congress and the administration should stop funding of the CMRR, which is projected to cost between $3.7 billion and $5.8 billion.

    The report came up with the following recommendations:

    • The administration and DOE should cancel CMRR-NF and zero out funding for the project in the upcoming budget.

    • If the administration and DOE fail to act, Congress should cancel funding for CMRR-NF in its next appropriations bill.

  • Duvall to join LANL Site Office

    Governor Susana Martinez announced Friday that Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Secretary Michael Duvall has accepted a position with the National Nuclear Security Administration as Assistant Manager for Safeguards and Security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Office.

    Duvall, who was making $103,000 with the state, will leave his post as DHSEM cabinet secretary effective Jan. 29 to transition to his new position overseeing security and safety operations for one of the nation’s most sensitive facilities.

  • NM Homeland Security director going to LANL

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's Homeland Security and Emergency Management Secretary Michael Duvall is stepping down to take a job at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Duvall, a retired Air Force commander who made $103,000 with the state, will become assistant manager for safeguards and security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Office. His last day with the state is Jan. 29.

    Duvall has been in the job since Gov. Susana Martinez took office last January. During that year, he oversaw the state's responses to several crises, including the last winter's cold freeze and natural gas outage and last summer's record-setting fire season, which saw the largest wildfire in state history threaten Los Alamos.

  • Lab, Malaysia collaborate on dwarfism

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Centre for Chemical Biology at Universiti Sains Malaysia (CCB@USM) have launched a human genome project to study an individual with achondroplasia disorder, the most common form of dwarfism.
    The project began with the dream of Malaysian graduate student Ling Sze Lee to answer the question “Why am I different?”

  • Students avoid LANL budget cutbacks

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Integrated Stewardship made some decisions regarding its student hiring process, according to the lab’s internal website this week.

    The LISC, which is trying to make financial decisions in order to achieve $200 million in savings across the lab, announced it would not be mandating specific cuts to the number of students or require a specific cost reduction to student programs.

  • Eight researchers named APS Fellows

    The American Physical Society (APS) has selected eight LANL scientists as 2011 Fellows. The APS is a nonprofit organization working to advance the knowledge of physics through its research journals, scientific meetings, outreach, advocacy, and international activities.
    It represents 48,000 members worldwide, including physicists in academia, national laboratories, and industry. Only half of one percent of APS members can be elected to Fellowship yearly.
    And the new APS Fellows are:
    • Michael (Misha) Chertkov of Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems: “For fundamental theoretical contributions in statistical hydrodynamics and physics of information and algorithms.”

  • Nanotube 'glow sticks' transform science tool kit


    Many physical and chemical processes necessary for biology and chemistry occur at the interface of water and solid surfaces. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory publishing in Nature Nanotechnology have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes — light emitting cylinders of pure carbon — have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water.
    Using high-speed microscopic imaging, they found that nanotubes could both detect and track the motion of individual molecules as they bombard the surface at the water interface.
    Traditional techniques to investigate molecules on surfaces cannot be used in water because the study requires low-pressure atmospheres such as one finds in space.