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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • DOE begins climate research at Cape Cod

    The Department of Energy today announced that scientists are beginning an air particles research initiative at Cape Cod National Seashore in Massachusetts designed to improve model simulations of the Earth’s climate system.

    Specifically, experiments will use dozens of instruments on the ground and in the air to measure cloud properties and tiny particles in the air, such as dust, soot and sea salt—referred to as aerosols.  Addressing the question of how aerosols interact with clouds and change over time will significantly improve the accuracy of computer models that simulate Earth’s climate system.  

  • Senators join CMRR chorus

    New Mexico Senators Tom Udall and Jeff Bingaman wrote letters Thursday to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Energy Secretary Steven Chu, expressing their concerns with the National Nuclear Security Administration’s decision to defer construction of the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility.
    The letters, dated Thursday, detail consequences of delaying the beleaguered project for five years.
    The letters state:
    “• First, it will adversely impact our nation’s scientific capabilities, especially in analytical chemistry and materials characterization that are central to assuring the safety, reliability and performance of the nuclear deterrent.

  • Eight senators fight for CMRR

    Eight U.S. senators — six Republicans, a Democrat, and an independent— wrote a letter recently to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, urging the resurrection of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement project at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  • Wallace speaks to community leaders

    Terry Wallace, the principal associate director for global security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, briefs community leaders at a breakfast at the lab Tuesday. Juan Griego, the deputy director at the Los Alamos Site Office, also gave a briefing. Afterward, leaders went on numerous tours at the lab.

  • Community water events take center stage later this week

    The theme for the community water events planned by the Communities for Clean Water is “Weaving Our Río Grande Communities Together.”  
    Three public education programs will be in Santa Fe and Española on Thursday and in Española on Friday.  The programs are free and open to the public.  
    On Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., a Community Water Forum will be conducted at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, located at 201 Marcy Street.  Its main topic will be the Buckman Projects and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).  

  • President honors lab researcher

    A young Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist, Amy J. Clarke, is among the honorees that President Obama named as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

    “Discoveries in science and technology not only strengthen our economy, they inspire us as a people,” Obama said. “The impressive accomplishments of today’s awardees so early in their careers promise even greater advances in the years ahead.”

  • Peace exhibit opens at Bradbury

    Artist and peace activist Shannyn Sollitt doesn’t just want you to see her artwork, she wants you to feel it.
    Currently hanging in the Bradbury Science Museum’s public forum space is a symbol Sollitt created incorporating cultural and religious icons from around the world.

    “I hope that people standing in front of the icon will get peace from looking at it; will receive the positive energy that went into it and the energy from the various spiritual paths represented in it,” said Sollitt, a resident of Santa Fe. “I hope they walk out of the Bradbury Science Museum with a new sense of inspiration and hope.”

  • D.C. tackles lab oversight -- at a later time

    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations had scheduled a hearing for Friday in Washington. The title of the hearing is “DOE’s Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship.”

    But according to a Thursday afternoon posting of the Energy and Commerce Committee website, the hearing has been postponed indefinitely.

    Among those expected to testify are NNSA administrator Thom D’Agostino and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman. Others expected to testify include Glenn Podonsky, DOE’s Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Gregory Friedman, DOE’s Inspector General and Gene Aloise of the Government Accountability Office.

  • NNSA seeks extension

    On June 18, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board sent a letter to the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, concerning the Plutonium Facility.

    The letter laid out DNFSB concerns with identified deficiencies in Revision 1 of the 2011 Documented Safety Analysis for the Plutonium Facility. The Board requested a report and briefing within 30 days addressing the deficiencies.

  • SOC set to make cuts

    According to an email acquired by the Los Alamos Monitor, there could be even more cutbacks at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Serving Our Country (SOC), which provides security to LANL, will possibly eliminate 31 positions in a restructuring that is still under negotiations. The email indicated that SOC was pursuing voluntary separation packages for the lost positions.

    Lab spokesman Fred DeSousa said the proposed cuts are not part of the 80 contractor positions cut by LANL last month.
    He referred inquiries to SOC spokesperson Liddie Martinez, who was traveling to Washington D.C. and unavailable for comment.