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Local News

  • GOP retools plan as Congress seeks to avert debt crisis

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Six days away from a potentially calamitous government default, House Republicans on Wednesday appeared to be slowly coalescing around a plan by House Speaker John Boehner to avert the debt crisis — a plan Boehner was still retooling to increase its complement of spending cuts. But Senate Democrats insisted the short-term solution Republicans were crafting would leave the economy on shaky footing.
    Each side claimed the moral high ground as a new day of jockeying over to how to end the debt crisis began. And budget analysts suggested both sides had been over-promising how much in spending cuts their rival plans would deliver.

  • Update 07-27-11

    Movie night

    The White Rock Family Friendly Film Series presents “Rango” at 7 p.m. Thursday in the White Rock Town Hall.

    Authors speak

    The Authors Speak Series presents “Novel Destinations,” a talk and slideshow by Robert Gibson, John Arrowsmith and Chris Ortega, on their trip to Mt. Kilimanjaro at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Mesa Public Library’s upstairs rotunda.

    Bulk item pickup

    Items will be picked up July 25-Aug. 5 in White Rock. Items must be curbside by 8 a.m. each day.

    Nuclear talk

  • Council examines nuisance code

    As it is currently written, the only enforcement action allowed for nuisance violations is prosecuting the violation as a general misdemeanor (a criminal offense) before the Municipal Court. Penalties under the county’s misdemeanor code include up to $500 in fines and/or 90 days in jail. Proposed changes to the code would decriminalize all but the most egregious violations of the code.

    Nuisance codes regulate outdoor storage of materials, including rubbish, brush and junk items, to ensure that community members can enjoy their property without interference by actions of nearby owners. The codes are meant to insure cleanliness, health and safety and to protect property values.

  • Runoff causing problems

    The people associated with the Burn Area Emergency Recovery team have a saying.

    Ash happens.

    Monsoon season is here and rains have hit the burn scar of the Las Conchas Fire and ash and debris are being washed off mountainsides, down canyons and into the Rio Grande.

    That has forced utilities in Santa Fe and Albuquerque to halt their drinking water diversions until the river clears up.

    “Just from a mechanical and maintenance standpoint, we didn’t want all this ash and crud to get into our system that we then would have to clean out,” said David Morris, a spokesman for the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, which serves about 540,000 people.

  • Pajarito ski hill survives fire

    At least 90 percent of skiable terrain at the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area survived the massive Las Conchas Fire unscathed.

    Members of the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area Board of Directors held a special meeting last week after assessing what minimal damage did occur.

    The board is making plans for the rehabilitation of the ski hill before winter sets in. They’ve devised a plan to prioritize and focus on a number of projects, which will require volunteer help from the community

    “There is much to accomplish before opening the Ski Area for winter operations,” board member Vance Boone said. “Buildings need to be cleaned, there’s construction to be done and we’ve got some logging and chipping work.”

  • BAER update

    - BAER Treatment Information -

  • Analysts: Senate plan saves $2.2 trillion

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Budget analysts said Wednesday that a Senate Democratic plan to reduce the deficit and increase the nation's borrowing authority would save $2.2 trillion over a decade, more than a rival House Republican proposal but less than promised. With both bills stuck in neutral, Congress, financial markets and the public remained on edge days before the deadline for heading off a potentially calamitous default.

  • Texas agriculture losses could set new record amid drought

    LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) — Randy McGee spent $28,000 in one month pumping water onto about 500 acres in West Texas before he decided to give up irrigating 75 acres of corn and focus on other crops that stood a better chance in the drought.

    He thought rain might come and save those 75 acres, but it didn't and days of triple-digit heat sucked the remaining moisture from the soil. McGee walked recently through rows of sunbaked and stunted stalks, one of thousands of farmers counting his losses amid record heat and drought this year.

  • South Korea landslides leave 32 dead, 10 missing--video extra

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A blast of heavy rain sent landslides barreling through South Korea's capital and a northern town Wednesday, killing at least 32 people, including 10 college students doing volunteer work.

    The students died as mud and debris engulfed them as they slept in a resort cabin in Chuncheon, about 68 miles (110 kilometers) northeast of the capital Seoul, said Byun In-soo of the town's fire station. A married couple and a convenience store owner also died.

  • Clarification 07-26-11

    The Las Conchas Burned Area Emergency Response team released the acreage burned by jurisdiction last week. The chart said that 133 acres burned on Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory property. Lab spokesperson Jeff Berger emailed to clarify saying that just two acres burned on actual lab property and the rest burned on DOE property. The headline in Sunday’s story indicated that 133 acres burned on lab property.