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Local News

  • 10 things to know for Tuesday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about Tuesday:

    1. WHAT THE U.S. BELIEVES IS KEY TO STOPPING GAZA WARFARE

    As a first step, the White House insists that Hamas must cease firing rockets into Israel.

    2. SOJOURNING OBAMA SCOLDS AN AUTOCRAT

    The president delivers his condemnation of Cambodia's Hun Sen in private. Some fear government censors will keep his stern words from reaching the Cambodian people.

    3. A PUSH FOR WIDESPREAD, ROUTINE HIV SCREENING

    All Americans ages 15 to 64 should get an HIV test at least once, a health panel says.

    4. RED STATES, BLUE STATES: THE DIVIDE WIDENS

    In fully half the U.S., the November election created powerful one-party legislatures that can act with no need for compromise.

  • Ind. home explosion now homicide investigation

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Authorities launched a homicide investigation Monday into the house explosion that killed a young couple and left numerous homes uninhabitable in an Indianapolis neighborhood.

    Indianapolis Homeland Security Director Gary Coons made the announcement after meeting with residents of the subdivision where the Nov. 10 blast occurred and shortly after funerals were held for the two victims, who lived next door to the house where investigators believe the explosion originated.

    "We are turning this into a criminal homicide investigation," Coons said, marking the first time investigators have acknowledged a possible criminal element to the case.

    Search warrants have been executed and official are looking for a white van that was seen in the subdivision the day of the blast, Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry said. Authorities are offering at least a $10,000 reward.

    Curry said the investigation is aimed at "determining if there are individuals who may be responsible for this explosion and fire."

  • Talking Turkey: Butterball Talk-Line Experts
  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about today:

    1. NO LETUP IN VIOLENCE BETWEEN ISRAEL AND HAMAS

    Palestinian militants continued to barrage Israel with rockets, and Israel announced it was widening its offensive to target the military commanders of the ruling Islamist group.

    2. CONGRESS LOOKS TO EGYPT FOR SOLUTION TO MIDDLE EAST VIOLENCE

    Lawmakers say Cairo needs to take serious diplomatic steps to rein in Hamas.

    3. OBAMA EXTENDS 'HAND OF FRIENDSHIP' TO LONG-SHUNNED MYANMAR

    The president makes a historic trip to the Asian nation, meeting its leader Thein Sein and longtime activist Aung San Suu Kyi.

    4. HOW OBAMA'S EDUCATION AGENDA COULD UNFOLD IN SECOND TERM

  • Today in History for November 19th
  • Moonshine Makers Set Up Shop in Ga. City Hall

    Moonshine distillers are making their first batches of legal liquor in this tiny Georgia town's city hall, not far from the mountains and the maroon, orange and gold canopy of trees that once hid bootleggers from the law.

  • Today in History for November 18th
  • Valles Caldera announces winter schedule

    Snowshoeing, cross country skiing and sleigh rides highlight a full calendar of winter activities announced by the Valles Caldera National Preserve.  
    The schedule also includes two free snowshoeing and skiing access days. Winter hours are from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at the Valle Grande Staging Area.
    An expanded holiday schedule will run every day from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Dec. 26 through Jan. New this season, the preserve will remain open for the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday, Jan. 21 and for President’s Day, Feb. 18.  
     Skiing and snowshoeing open the season on Dec. 7, weather permitting. Fees are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors (62 years and older), $8 for youth (5-15 years) while kids four and younger are free. Five-day passes are available for $40 per adult and $32 for seniors and youth.
    Reservations are not required but all must check in and depart from the Valle Grande staging area. Also, the Valle Grande Trail, Coyote Call Trail and the surrounding area on the south side of N.M. 4 will remain open every day for hiking, skiing and snowshoeing free of charge.

  • Update 11-18-12

    Special Section

    Look for “The Spirit of Giving” special section in Thursday’s Los Alamos Monitor. The publication will be packed with information to help you shop smarter, not harder.

    Trash collection

    In observance of Thanksgiving, there will be no trash or recycling collection on Nov. 22 or Nov. 23. If Thursday or Friday is your normal pickup day put out trash and recycling by 8 a.m. Nov. 21 for collection. 

    Office closed

    The Los Alamos Monitor office will be closed in observance of Thanksgiving Day, Thursday. Normal office hours will resume Friday.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Nov. 27  in council chambers.

    Library board

    The Los Alamos County Library Board holds regular meetings the first Monday of each month (excluding holidays) at 5:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library Board Room or at White Rock Branch Library. The next meeting is Dec. 3.

  • WIPP appeal filed against NMED

    Southwest Research and Information Center and Margaret Elizabeth Richards filed a Notice of Appeal in the New Mexico Court of Appeals against the New Mexico Environment Department decision of Nov. 1, to allow “hot” Remote-Handled transuranic nuclear waste in shielded containers to come to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

    The appellants and approximately 200 individuals argue that the request to modify the state’s WIPP permit be subject to a public hearing because of the dangers posed by RH waste, the technical complexity of handling RH waste at WIPP and the substantial public interest in the request.

    NMED approved the Department of Energy request although the state agency had in December 2011 and January 2012 rejected virtually the same request.

    “SRIC feels that the permit request was incomplete and did not adequately address the real reason that DOE wants shielded containers — there is not enough space for RH waste because of the way the facility has been mismanaged. State law requires a public hearing, but since NMED rubberstamped the request, we have no choice but to sue,” said Don Hancock of SRIC.