.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Man jailed on $100K bond in Gov. Martinez threats case

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A Valencia County man facing five misdemeanor charges for allegedly harassing Gov. Susana Martinez remains behind bars in the Santa Fe County jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond despite facing only misdemeanor charges.

    The attorney for 61-year-old James Sanchez acknowledges his client left multiple messages with the Governor's Office of Constituent Services in Santa Fe using profanity and insulting language and accusing the governor of ignoring his complaints. Attorney Thomas Esquibel said his client has been on a "crusade" to protect his family from cows crossing a residential subdivision road.

    The state claims that he has threatened Martinez's life and the lives of some of her staff in the process.

    In several audio recordings of Sanchez's messages released to reporters on Friday by Esquibel, Sanchez can be heard cursing in English and Spanish, claiming that Martinez had "breached" her obligations to take care of Sanchez's children.

  • Today in History for September 17th
  • Today in History for September 16th
  • Funding sources help define Statehouse candidates

    The First General Report for the District 43 House seat shows some marked differences between the supporters of incumbent Rep. Jim Hall (R) and challenger Stephanie Garcia Richard (D).

    Hall, who was appointed to the seat in June, 2011 after the death of Rep. Jeannette Wallace, has raised $59,605.03. More than half of Hall’s campaign fund–$36,085.15–is a loan from Hall and his wife Janet.

    Hall has received considerable support from the Republican party, including $2,500 from the Republican Party of Santa Fe County and $500 each from the Friends of Paul Bandy election committee and the Committee to Elect James Strickler. The Friends of Yvette Herrell campaign committee also has contributed $250 and the Santa Fe Federated Republican Women Political Action Committee also donated $100.

    Hall also has support from the gaming industry. Sunray Gaming of New Mexico LLC has contributed $1,000 and Sunland Park Racetrack and Casino gave $500.

    Other significant contributors include New Mexico Dental Political Action Committee ($1,500), a lobbying group named Car of New Mexico ($1,000) and Enterprise Holdings, Inc, a political action committee of Enterprise Rent-a-Car gave $550.

  • Council campaign donations subdued

    First General Reports for the 2012 campaign reveal that Councilor Vincent Chiravalle (R) and Kristin Henderson (D) are by far the biggest fundraisers in the race to fill three council seats.

    But a closer look at both primary and general election reports reveal interesting patterns in terms of where the money is coming from.

    The question of how much spending influences elections — as opposed to other factors such as grassroots campaigning — may never be resolved. But money does have the ability to influence the outcome of elections.

    So far, Chiravalle has raised a total of $3,935 since the campaign season began, with $500 of that being a contribution to his own campaign.

    Chiravalle also has raised more out-of-county money than any other candidates, with $1,885 coming from Los Alamos county residents and $1,550 coming from outside donors, mostly from New Jersey. Joseph Rinaldi of Carteret, N.J., contributed $1,300.

    When asked about these large outside contributions, Chiravalle replied, “I have received donations for my re-election campaign from my supporters, family and friends. Joseph Rinaldi is my uncle.”

  • Bond question goes to voters

    The Los Alamos School Board worked long into the night last week shaping up a bond resolution. The resolution will ask Los Alamos residents permission to bond up to $20 million in construction funds for various renovations and maintenance to shore up Los Alamos Public Schools aging infrastructure.

    According to Superintendent Gene Schmidt and the Los Alamos School Board, it wasn’t if they were sending a ballot to residents, but when. The board thought the bond question was so vital to LAPS’ future that they wanted to time its arrival at residents’ homes when it would have the most impact. That meant timing it for when the college students would be home, and when families would be home from their winter vacations and resuming regular mail service.

    No one wanted to see the ballots disappear in the piles of vacation mail or worse, get confused with the other elections happening around the same time. One of the board’s biggest fears that if they chose to have voters come in and vote, not enough people would come out to support the bond initiative.

  • Hilltoppers lose at St. Pius X 41-0

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper football team was roughed up on the road by an old district rival Saturday.
    The St. Pius X Sartans took advantage of some key Hilltopper miscues Saturday at Milne Stadium in Albuquerque.
    A late first half fumble set up a 4-yard touchdown run by TJ Sanchez, then another lost Hilltopper fumble on their first possession of the third quarter led to another short Sanchez touchdown run.
    Sanchez, St. Pius’ tailback, finished with four touchdowns as the ninth-ranked Sartans cruised to a 41-0 victory. St. Pius scored 20 points following Los Alamos turnovers.
    The Hilltoppers (1-2) and Sartans (2-1) were former District 2-4A rivals.
    Saturday was the first time the two teams had played, however, since the Sartans moved out of district following the 2006 season.
    This was the second straight time Los Alamos has been shut out on the road this season.
    It was blanked at Farmington eight days earlier, 28-0.
    Los Alamos will host its homecoming match-up Friday.
    The homecoming game against Kirtland Central is set for 7 p.m.
    Special thanks to KRSN AM 1490 for its help in compiling this report.
     

  • Sports in brief 9-16-12

     

    Hawks win at ATC meet

     

    Cross country: Rees is top finisher in boys mid-school race

     

    The Los Alamos Middle School cross country teams swept the team competition at the Academy for Technology and the Classics invitational Sept. 8.

    The Hawk boys and girls teams both finished with identical scores of 32 points to pick up both victories, while Ben Rees was the individual champ in the boys race.

    The ATC Everybody Invitational, its inaugural running, was held in Santa Fe.

    LAMS’ girls held off a stiff challenger in Peñasco, which finished with 40 points. El Dorado Community School was a distant third.

    In the girls’ race, LAMS was paced by Zoe Chalacombe. Chalacombe finished second overall with a time of 10 minutes, 58 seconds for the 1.5-mile course.

    Rees posted a time of 9:19 to take top honors in the boys race, which also covered 1.5 miles.

    In the boys team competition, Pecos finished 21 points back of LAMS, followed by Peñasco in third (151 points).

     

    Bjorklund wins this week’s Pace Race

     

     

     

    Lynn Bjorklund picked up the win in this week’s Atomic City Roadrunners’ Pace Race.

  • Stuck skunk on Sycamore
  • Rahn family focuses on sense of normalcy

    After what some would call a brutal, and highly-publicized three-month journey through the criminal justice system, all Thomas Rahn has to show for his ordeal is a terse, 21-word statement from the Los Alamos District Court: “The criminal complaint filed in the above styled cause is hereby dismissed because of insufficient evidence and the interest of justice.”

    For Rahn and his family, the statement offers little comfort.

    From the time the Los Alamos Police Department issued a warrant for his arrest in July until last Wednesday, when the court dismissed all charges against Rahn relating to the alleged sexual abuse of children, Rahn’s professional and family life has been in turmoil. An employee at Los Alamos National Laboratory, his security clearance was revoked and until last week, he’s had to stay away from his family.

    Standing on the front lawn of his home with his wife last week, Rahn did not have much to say, only that he felt unfairly treated by the justice system in general, and the media as well.

    “It was very unfortunate the way things happened, the way things steamrolled and got out of hand,” he said. “People need to understand that the system is all powerful and things can easily get carried away.”