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Local News

  • A way out, at last, for Chile's 33 trapped miners

    SAN JOSE MINE, Chile (AP) — A drilling rig punched through to the underground purgatory where 33 miners have been trapped for 66 agonizing days under the Chilean desert, raising cheers, tears and hopes on Saturday.

  • Clarification

    The Los Alamos Concert Association will present Julie Albers and pianist Orion Weiss at 4 p.m. Oct. 17 in the Duane Smith Auditorium. Albers and Weiss, distinguished virtuosos, will not perform with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra in November as reported in Thursday’s “Kaleidoscope.” The Monitor regrets any confusion the report may have caused.

  • BofA halts foreclosure sales in 50 states

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Bank of America Corp., the nation's largest bank, is stopping sales of foreclosed homes in all 50 states as it reviews potential flaws in foreclosure documents.

    The company had previously said it would only stop such sales in the 23 states where foreclosures must be approved by a judge.

  • Jones resigns as NSC chief, Donilon next director

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In another White House shake up, President Barack Obama on Friday announced that his national security adviser, Gen. James Jones, was stepping down after helping to shape the foreign policy for nearly two years. Tom Donilon, Jones' deputy, will take over as the top security adviser.

  • Elected officials should be allowed only so much fun

    Serving a maximum of eight years as an elected official is enough fun, Los Alamos County Councilors agreed during their regular meeting Tuesday night. When asked to consider joining the New Mexico Association of Counties’ (NMAC) support of Amendment 2 to the state Constitution, the councilors agreed to take no action.
    Currently, county elected officials are restricted to serving two consecutive four-year terms. If the voters approve the resolution during this year’s election then the amendment would allow county officials to serve a third term.

  • Council candidates put to the test

    Anybody can talk a good game but are they able to walk the walk?
    During the League of Women Voters’ forum for Los Alamos County Council candidates Thursday night at Fuller Lodge, members of the public put the candidates to the test.
    The forum revealed that the council candidates share similar views on many of the topics raised during the question and answer period.

  • Race for Magistrate bench turns sour

    Likening Magistrate Judge Pat Casados’s performance to the under-sized, doughnut-like spare tire found inside the trunk of many cars and himself as a “brand new tire” is how challenger Gary Ahlers characterized the race in his opening remarks at Tuesday’s forum.
    “My opponent is doing an OK job…but we need to take the doughnut off and put a brand new tire on…,” Ahlers said.
    The Republican lost a 2006 run against two-time Democratic incumbent Casados.

  • Chinese dissident Liu wins Nobel Peace Prize

    OSLO, Norway (AP) — Imprisoned Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for using nonviolence to demand fundamental human rights in his homeland. The award ignited a furious response from China, which accused the Norwegian Nobel Committee of violating its own principles by honoring "a criminal."

  • Sides in Mideast talks hope stalemate can be broken

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S., Israeli and Palestinian officials are hopeful they can break an impasse that has threatened to kill new U.S.-brokered Mideast peace talks before they really begin.

    A U.S. official close to the negotiations said Wednesday that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu seems likely to cut a deal to keep the talks going. Palestinian officials said much the same, and Israeli officials said Netanyahu does not want talks to founder.

  • White House defends waivers from new health law

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Thursday defended granting waivers to some employers from a key provision of the new health care law, saying it was the best way to keep people insured until the law fully takes effect.

    At issue is a new requirement banning annual caps on benefits, which began phasing in last month. Many employers and insurers that offer low-cost, low-benefit insurance plans known as "mini-med" plans would not have been able to comply with the new requirement without raising monthly premiums to virtually unaffordable levels.