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Local News

  • Council ponders the future of Progress Through Partnering

    When Los Alamos County adopted a new set of strategic goals in 2005, the second highest priority was to improve intergovernmental relations. Progress Through Partnering (PTP) was one of the programs developed to implement that goal.

    With the Los Alamos National Laboratory Contract Change, also in 2005, the county received additional Gross Receipts Tax (GRT) revenues. Council decided to contribute some of the additional revenue to projects that would help neighboring communities as well as advance the county’s strategic goals.

  • FDA issues graphic cigarette labels

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — In the most significant change to U.S. cigarette packs in 25 years, the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday released nine new warning labels that depict in graphic detail the negative health effects of tobacco use.

    Among the images to appear on cigarette packs are rotting and diseased teeth and gums and a man with a tracheotomy smoking.

  • Crunch time looms as Biden-led budget talks resume

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner offered a bullish assessment Tuesday of the chances of success for Vice President Joe Biden and a bipartisan band of lawmakers trying to craft a deal to slash the federal budget and raise the debt limit.

    "We are going to avoid a default crisis, no doubt about that. It is not going to happen," Geithner told a group of business executives. "We are going to have a bipartisan deficit reduction framework. The question is what is going to be the shape of that framework."

  • Crews fight Santa Fe fire, more bans imposed in NM

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Firefighters banked on cooler temperatures and slightly less gusty winds Monday for help in slowing wildfires burning around New Mexico, as the state's top land manager issued an open-ended ban to prevent fires on millions of acres of state trust land.

    The ban announced Monday by Land Commissioner Ray Powell was simple and straight forward: No fireworks, open fires or smoking until further notice.

    The ban covers the state's 13 million acres, or more than 20,300 square miles, of trust land.

  • NM lawmakers start the task of redistricting

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A legislative panel plans to travel across the state in July and August to seek public comment on proposals for drawing new boundaries of New Mexico's three congressional districts.

    One of those proposals would combine the cities of Rio Rancho and Albuquerque into a revised 1st Congressional District. Republican-leaning Rio Rancho currently is in the heavily Democratic 3rd District of northern New Mexico.

    Democrats hold the 1st and 3rd district seats.

  • State Police ID 3 found shot to death in El Rancho home

    EL RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — State police say three people found shot to death Sunday evening in a town north of Santa Fe were all related.

    The victims have been identified as 55-year-old Lloyd Ortiz, 53-year-old Dixie Ortiz and 21-year-old Steven Ortiz .State police spokesman Tim Johnson said all three were shot but he declined to release any other information about the case or speculate on a motive.

    The victims were found Sunday night at a home in El Rancho, about 30 miles north of Santa Fe.

    Johnson said police received a 911 call about the shooting about 7:15 Sunday night.

     

  • Mortillaro a finalist in Topeka Kansas city manager search

    The former county administrator in Los Alamos, Anthony Mortillaro, has been named one of two finalists in the running to become the next city manager in Topeka, Kansas.

    A report on the Topeka Capital-Journal website said that Mortillaro and another candidate from south Texas emerged as the top picks after the city council narrowed the field following interviews with the leading six contenders which were conducted Thursday and Saturday.

    Topeka City Council is expected to make a decision during a meeting slated for Monday evening.

    Mortillaro is also in the running to become city manager in Auburn, New York.

  • High winds, temperatures propel wildfires

    ALBUQUERQUE — Firefighters are confronting strong winds and steamy weekend temperatures in their battle to keep more homes, dry forests and stretches of high desert from the flames of several wildfires throughout the Southwest.
    With summer rains still weeks away, forecasters said crews would likely have little relief from the hot, windy weather that dogging them this past week. More high-wind warnings and fire weather watches were on tap for many areas through the weekend.
    Along the New Mexico-Colorado border, the wind got stronger as Friday progressed, testing fire lines that had been cleared through the rugged wooded area by bulldozers.
    Flags at the incident command post were whipping.

  • Co-op hosts Student Sustainability Challenge

    Organic food and environmentally friendly products were only part of the reason the Student Sustainability Challenge visited the Los Alamos Cooperative Market on Wednesday. The co-op’s business model provides insight into an array of sustainable practices.

    Event coordinator Angelica Gurule, of the Environmental-Risk Reduction Office, introduced General Manager Steve Watts by saying, “You vote with your cash. Every time you make a purchase you vote for what you want that store to supply.”

  • Rail Runner weekend service to be eliminated

    ALBUQUERQUE — Regional transit officials have voted to end weekend service on New Mexico’s commuter train.
    The Rio Metro Regional Transit District Board announced the decision Friday.
    The board had been considering two weekday schedule options for the New Mexico Rail Runner Express, but members instead voted 6-5 to eliminate weekend service to balance the fiscal year 2012 budget.
    The budget is $1.2 million less than the previous year because certain federal air quality dollars will no longer be available.
    Board chairman Steve Shaw says the board thinks it’s important to support the initial mission of the commuter train without affecting people who use it to get to and from work.

    The Associated Press