Local News

  • Feds work with pueblo on fire recovery

    ALBUQUERQUE — The damage done to one Native American community’s ancestral lands by the largest wildfire in New Mexico’s recorded history is being assessed as part of a new agreement reached between tribal leaders and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
    An agency contractor this week started collecting aerial photographs of the burned area along Santa Clara Pueblo’s charred canyon as the first step in the watershed assessment.
    Officials said the $1.8 million study is expected to take three years to complete. The findings will provide the basis for a long-term plan aimed at restoration and flood prevention.

  • Rumble in the Rio

    Twenty-eight police officers, firefighters and metro detention center personnel will face off in the eighth annual Rumble in the Rio charity bout at 7 p.m., Oct. 22 at the Santa Ana Star Casino. 2011 Rumble in Rio contenders include Los Alamos Police Lt. Jason Wardlow-Herrera who will fight in the first bout againt Santa Fe County Firefighter Grant Lundquist in the 200 lb. category, Los Alamos Firefighter Manfred Herman will take on Victor Duran of the Metro Detention Center in the 180 lb. category and Los Alamos Firefighter Daniel Garcia will go up against Steven Schmitt of the Metro Detention Center in the 160 lb. category.
    Tickets are available at the Santa Ana Star Players Club, www.startickets.com.

  • Analysis: NM redistricting replays 2001 battle

    SANTA FE — Democratic divisions in the House doomed the Legislature’s chance to approve a plan that would revamp the boundaries of New Mexico’s congressional districts.
    The Legislature ended a special session last weekend without the House and Senate agreeing on a congressional redistricting plan. But in the end, it may not matter.
    A court almost certainly will determine the makeup of the three congressional districts. That’s what happened a decade ago.
    Even if the Democrat-controlled Legislature had passed a plan during the special session, there’s a strong chance Republican Gov. Susana Martinez would have vetoed it, and the dispute would have ended up in court anyway.

  • Update 09-28-11

    Council meeting

    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 in council chambers.

    Public meeting

    The Eastern Area Maintenance Project Public meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m., today at the council chambers.


    The Los Alamos High School homecoming parade will be held at 2:30 p.m. Friday in downtown Los Alamos. At
    7 p.m., the Hilltoppers football team will host Albuquerque Academy at Sullivan Field.

    Hall update

    State Rep. Jim Hall of Los Alamos will speak at noon to 1 p.m. Oct. 4 on what he has learned since he was chosen to succeed the late Rep. Jeannette Wallace in the legislature. Kiwanis meets each Tuesday at the Masonic Temple on Sage.

  • Payne points to wins in Rio Rancho

    This is the final story in a series featuring highlights from the community panel interviews of the county administrator candidates. Answers to some of the questions, such as the candidate’s experience and how it relates to the position, have been covered in previous Los Alamos Monitor stories.

    Jim Payne served one year as city manager for Rio Rancho and has nearly 25 years experience as a city administrator in Wisconsin and Iowa.

    In relating that prior experience to the challenges in Los Alamos, Payne pointed to specific examples of his economic development experience.

  • Experts propose life saving actions after nuclear strike

    WASHINGTON — Major cities and other communities in the United States can take a number of preparedness measures to drastically reduce the number fatalities and illnesses that would follow a nuclear strike, a leading nongovernmental organization declared on Tuesday.

    The Rad Resilient City plan includes a seven-point checklist composed by an expert panel that communities can implement to better protect residents from radioactive fallout after an atomic blast. Adherence to the guidelines could save more than 100,000 lives, according to the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Biosecurity, which led development of the report.

  • Zerkle earns Congressional Award Bronze Medal

  • Two power outages hit Los Alamos County

    Los Alamos County sustained two power outages in the past two days.
     At  5:50 p.m. Wednesday,  electric power was lost to residents on 1st, 2nd, 3rd,Canyon, Pine, Quartz and Rim streets, according to the Dept of Public Utilities (DPU).  All affected customers, excepting those on 1st,2nd,and 3rd  had power restored by  7 p.m. The remaining 21 customers had power restored at 9:30 p.m.
    The outage was caused by a fault within a nearby transformer.   DPU’s electric linemen were able to restore power quickly to 82 of the 103 affected residents within an hour and ten minutes.
     Work then continued on the faulty transformer component and power was restored to the remaining 21 customers at 9:30 p.m.

  • Councilors talk infrastructure

    The Los Alamos County Council tackled a number of infrastructure projects during a regular meeting Tuesday evening.

    An ordinance to accept a loan/grant from the State of New Mexico for the reconstruction of the Los Alamos Dam was approved by a 6–0 vote. The $1.5 million funding includes a $900,000 grant and a $600,000 loan. Council had dedicated $2.7 from the general fund to the project, enough to finance the redesign if no state funds were awarded. To date, $600,000 has been spent on the project.

  • Supreme Court may have to step in to referee redistricting

    SANTA FE— New Mexico’s fight over redistricting has shifted to the courts, but the Supreme Court might have to step in to determine which judge will handle the assignment of drawing new boundaries of districts for elected offices.
    Republican and Democratic legislators and other voters have filed redistricting lawsuits at state district courts in Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Lovington.
    The cases ask the courts to establish new districts for Congress, the state House of Representatives, the state Senate and the Public Regulation Commission. The lawsuits also seek orders stopping state officials from using current districts for next year’s elections.