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Local News

  • Koala Has Lucky Escape From Australian Bushfire
  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about today:

    1. THE SECOND WOMAN IN THE PETRAEUS CASE

    A U.S. official says Jill Kelley, a longtime friend of the former CIA director and his wife, was getting harassing emails from Paula Broadwell, leading to the FBI investigation.

    2. AFGHAN CHILDREN DESCRIBE MASSACRE

    Staff Sgt. Robert Bales maintains a calm composure as they testified about the bloodbath that left their parents and other loved ones dead.

    3. ANOTHER AFTERMATH OF SANDY: DISASTER VOYEURS

    While residents and volunteers on Staten Island try to clean up after the storm, they also must deal with gawking tourists sneaking a look at the damage.

    4. SYRIAN JET BOMBS AREA 30 FEET FROM TURKISH BORDER

  • Today in History for November 12th
  • Raw: 2 Dead, Homes Flattened in Indy. Explosion

    A massive explosion sparked a huge fire and killed two people in an Indianapolis neighborhood where about three dozen homes were damaged or destroyed, authorities said Sunday.

  • Today in History for November 11th
  • Official: Emails from paramour led to FBI probe--Video Extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The scandal that brought down CIA Director David Petraeus started with harassing emails sent by his biographer and paramour, Paula Broadwell, to another woman, and eventually led the FBI to discover the affair, U.S. officials told The Associated Press on Saturday.

    Petraeus quit Friday after acknowledging an extramarital relationship.

    The official said the FBI investigation began several months ago with a complaint against Broadwell, a 40-year-old graduate of the U.S. Military Academy and an Army Reserve officer. That probe led agents to her email account, which uncovered the relationship with the 60-year-old retired four-star general, who earned acclaim for his leadership of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    The identity of the other woman and her connection with Broadwell were not immediately known.

  • Hotel's future uncertain

    The Los Alamos National Bank has put the wheels in motion to foreclose on the company that owns and manages the Hilltop House Hotel.

    The bank initiated the process against Hilltop House, LLC Oct. 19, but the hotel’s managing partner and at least one of its investors remain hopeful a deal can be struck with the bank to restructure the debt.

    The landmark 79-room hotel straddles some of the most high profile commercial property in Los Alamos at the convergence of Trinity and Central Avenue. But the overall economy and increased competition — both on and off the Hill — has left the 40-year-old lodge struggling for survival. 

    The foreclosure documents were filed in First Judicial District court in Los Alamos County by LANB attorney James R. Jurgens.

  • LANB officer explains bank foreclosure process

    Los Alamos National Bank president Steve Wells explained the bank’s foreclosure process in an email response to an inquiry from the Los Alamos Monitor.

    “It is important for anyone examining the foreclosure process to understand that banks are regulated by a state or federal regulator whose prime responsibility it is to ensure depositors funds are protected. 

    “LANB like all other banks and financial institutions make loans with depositor’s funds and manage the risks in lending to protect its depositors as well as those of its shareholders or members.

    “I cannot speak for other banks but know how we work at LANB. Foreclosing on a real estate mortgage we hold as collateral for a loan is always a last resort and a decision arrived at when no other viable option exists.”  

  • United Way update
  • Chamber surveys subcontractors

    Sure, the Los Alamos National Laboratory just may be the 800-pound gorilla in the room when it comes to the town’s economy.

    However, officials with the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce are saying the picture is more complicated when it comes to a very important segment of the economy, subcontractors who have a major share of business with LANL.

    A few weeks ago, during a forum hosted by the LACC, LANL announced that due to the economy and other forces beyond its control, it will be asking its subcontractors to share more of the overhead costs.

    To many subcontractors attending the forum, it sounded like a death knell for not only them, but the Los Alamos economy as well, since the effect would surely be felt throughout the town’s small business economy that in turn relies on the subcontractors to support local businesses.