Local News

  • Man who killed 2 firemen left note on killing plan

    WEBSTER, N.Y. (AP) — The ex-con who lured two firefighters to their deaths in a blaze of gunfire left a rambling typewritten note saying he wanted to burn down the neighborhood and "do what I like doing best, killing people," police said Tuesday as they recovered burned human remains believed to be the gunman's missing sister.

    Police Chief Gerald Pickering said 62-year-old William Spengler, who served 17 years in prison for the 1980 hammer slaying of his grandmother, armed himself with a revolver, a shotgun and a military-style rifle before he set his house afire to lure first responders into a death trap before dawn on Christmas Eve.

    "He was equipped to go to war, kill innocent people," Pickering said.

    The rifle he had was a military-style .223-caliber semiautomatic Bushmaster rifle with flash suppression, the same make and caliber weapon used in the elementary school massacre in Newtown, Conn., Pickering said.

    The chief said police believe the firefighters were hit with shots from the rifle given the distance but the investigation was incomplete.

  • Raw: Troops Celebrate Christmas in Afghanistan

    International troops in Afghanistan celebrated Christmas day with a traditional Christmas meal at Kabul International Airport in a dining hall packed with soldiers from the United States, France and Germany.

  • Residents rate county services

    The 2012 Los Alamos Community Survey indicates an overall satisfaction with county services and the quality of life in Los Alamos remains high, with only a few areas of relative dissatisfaction.

    The average rating for quality of life was 3.3 on a four point scale, with 87.3 percent of those responding rating it either “excellent” (37.3 percent) or “good” (53.0 percent). Overall rating for county services was also a 3.3.

    The survey, which had 420 respondents, is conducted every two years. The overall data for the entire sample is accurate to plus or minus 4.7 percent at the 95 percent confidence level.

    One significant change this year is that CRC and Associates, LLC, which conducted the survey, was able to reach more of the younger demographic.

    “We were able to capture a very well balanced demographic to population figures, which tended to give us more information from younger populations,” CRC President Chris Cordova said. “In my business, it’s been harder and harder over the years to get younger people to do surveys. So this year we used a mixed methodology that included phone surveys, but it also included Internet surveys so that we could get a younger demographic and make sure our survey was balanced.”

  • Update 12-25-12

    Monitor closed

    The Los Alamos Monitor office will be closed on Christmas and New Year’s Day.

    No blue bus service

    The NCRTD blue buses will not be in service Christmas day and New Year’s day. For more information call toll free 1-866-206-0754, or visit ridethebluebus.com.

    Holiday dance

    The Los Alamos Big Band will present their annual Christmas Dance from 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Thursday at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Admission is free.

    Christmas photos

    Send us your best photo from Christmas Day to be published later in the week for a Christmas in LA feature. Email your digital photos to info@lamonitor.com along with a brief description, names and ages of those pictured. Submit only one photo per household, please.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

  • Forest gets new deputy supervisor

     Joe Norrell is the new deputy forest supervisor for the Santa Fe National Forest. Norrell brings 14 years of federal service experience to the Forest Service and the local community.
    He chose Santa Fe due to the challenges of working on complex issues with people that have a rich history and strong connection to the land.
    Norrell, who grew up in Alaska, attributes his career and passion for the outdoors to his parents. His father was a professor at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, which helped afford the time to take him and his sisters on many camping, hiking and fishing trips during the summer months.
    He listened to his mother who worked for the Alaska State Legislature talk about politics and how the decisions made by the legislature would impact people, which influenced him to consider a career in public service.
    He attended Montana State University, receiving his bachelor’s degree in political science and master’s degree in public administration. Beginning in 1998, Norrell worked for the Alaska Department of Natural Resources as a temporary research assistant and three years for Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens in Washington, D.C. as a staff assistant on the Committee on Appropriations. Two of those years he spent working on the Interior and Natural Resources Subcommittee.

  • Elks collect toys for girls and boys

    The Elks Lodge set up an Angel Tree and worked with the Immaculate Heart Catholic church in Pojoaque and St. Vincent de Paul to provide gift packages for needy children. Pictured, left to right: Dave Williams, kneeling; Natalie Dimitruck (project chair); Jim Hay, Reine Williams, Mike Johnson, Holly Brown, Mark Sandoval, Trish Sandoval, Dick Bjarke.

  • 'Run, Run Rudolph' at 334 Garver Lane

    Here is a clip from the nightly light display in front of 334 Garver Lane. The lights in front of the house are synched up to music that can be heard by tuning in 93.7 FM near house. The display is on nightly.

  • Christmas Celebrated Around the World

    Christian faithful from around the world packed into churches on Christmas Eve to mark the beginning of the Christmas holiday with midnight mass.

  • Today in History for December 25th
  • Sex offender kills himself in Aztec standoff

    AZTEC, N.M. (AP) — Authorities say a registered sex offender wanted on a probation violation is dead after a nearly eight-hour barricade situation near the northwestern New Mexico city of Aztec.

    San Juan County Sheriff's officials say 39-year-old Byron Boyd fatally shot himself Monday night inside a cinder-block outbuilding.

    They sent a mechanical robot into the structure and confirmed that Boyd was down before deputies entered the structure.

    Before that, Boyd reportedly fired several shots at SWAT team members but nobody was hit.