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Local News

  • Sandy leaves death, damp and darkness in wake

    NEW YORK (AP) — As Superstorm Sandy marched slowly inland, millions along the East Coast awoke Tuesday without power or mass transit, with huge swaths of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark.

    New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center.

    The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds killed at least 16 people in seven states, cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses from the Carolinas to Ohio, caused scares at two nuclear power plants and stopped the presidential campaign cold.

    The massive storm reached well into the Midwest: Chicago officials warned residents to stay away from the Lake Michigan shore as the city prepares for winds of up to 60 mph and waves exceeding 24 feet well into Wednesday.

  • Storm puts nation's oldest nuke plant on alert

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's oldest nuclear power plant is on alert after waters from a colossal storm reached high levels.

    Oyster Creek in Lacey Township, N.J., was already offline for regular maintenance before Sandy, a superstorm downgraded Monday night from a hurricane, slammed the East Coast.

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says an "unusual event" was declared around 7 p.m. when water reached a high level. The situation was upgraded less than two hours later to an "alert," the second-lowest in a four-tiered warning system.

    Federal officials say all nuclear plants are still in safe condition. They say water levels near Oyster Creek, which is along the Atlantic Ocean, will likely recede within a few hours.

    Oyster Creek went online in 1969 and provides 9 percent of New Jersey's electricity.

  • Large parts of Manhattan plunged into darkness

    NEW YORK (AP) — A superstorm that sent water rushing onto city streets has left a large swath of the lower part of Manhattan without power.

    Consolidated Edison spokesman Chris Olert said Monday evening that the power was out for most of Manhattan south of 26th Street.

    On the east side, the power outage extended from 29th Street south. There were some scattered areas that still had electricity.

    Olert said the damage stemmed from flooding and the probable loss of a transmission feeder.

    The power outage was separate from a planned power cut that Con Ed did in certain lower Manhattan neighborhoods to protect underwater systems from flood damage.

    Olert said there were 250,000 customers without power in Manhattan. A customer represents a single meter, so the number of people actually affected is likely higher.

  • Raw: Facade Falls Off Manhattan Building Front

    The facade has fallen off the front of a four-story Manhattan building, leaving apartments visible from the street. There are no reported injuries.

  • Raw: 14 Rescued, 2 Missing From Tall Ship Off NC

    A replica tall ship caught in Hurricane Sandy's wrath began taking on water, forcing the crew to abandon the boat Monday off the North Carolina coast. The Coast Guard rescued 14 crew members by helicopter, but two people were still missing.

  • Raw: Hurricane Sandy Leaves Travelers Stranded

    Hurricane Sandy grounded thousands of flights from Atlanta to San Francisco Monday. The massive storm threatens to bring a near halt to air travel for at least two days in a key region for both domestic and international flights.

  • Raw: Amateur Video of Sandy Showing Up
  • Sign goes up on new brewpub

    Workers hoisted the sign at the new Pajarito Brewpub and Grill early Monday afternoon. The new eatery, located in the Mari-Mac shopping center, has not announced an opening date.

  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on today:

    1. SUPERSTORM NEARS EAST COAST

    Sandy is expected to come ashore Monday night in New Jersey bringing high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall.

    2. AIR TRAFFIC COMES TO A NEAR HALT AS NORTHEAST GEARS FOR SANDY

    Thousands of flight cancellations mean passengers are stranded from Hong Kong to Europe.

    3. WHAT THE KEY WAS TO THE GIANTS' SERIES SWEEP

    Some may point to MVP Pablo Sandoval's three homers in Game 1 while others say the clincher was Marco Scutaro's 10th inning hit in Game 4.

    4. CAMPAIGN'S LAST WEEK TURNS INTO SCHEDULING NIGHTMARE

  • East Coast grinds to a halt as superstorm nears

    NEW YORK (AP) — Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall.

    Sandy strengthened before dawn and stayed on a predicted path toward Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York — putting it on a collision course with two other weather systems that would create a superstorm with the potential for havoc over 800 miles from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. About 2 to 3 feet of snow were even forecast for mountainous parts of West Virginia.

    The tempest could endanger up to 50 million people for days.

    Many workers planned to stay home Monday as subways, buses and trains shut down across the region under the threat of flooding that could inundate tracks and tunnels. Airports also closed, and authorities warned that the time for evacuation was running out or already past. Utilities brought in extra crews, anticipating widespread power failures.