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Local News

  • Interim CEO named for LAMC

    The Los Alamos Medical Center today announced that F. Curtis Smith has been named interim CEO while a national search for a permanent CEO is underway.  Smith assumes the top leadership role on an interim basis following the resignation of Wally Vette, according to Don Bivacca, President of the National Division of LifePoint Hospitals of which LAMC is a part.
    “We are fortunate to have Curt Smith serve as our interim CEO at Los Alamos as we launch an aggressive national search for qualified candidates to fill the top leadership role on a permanent basis,” said Bivacca.  “Curt has considerable healthcare management experience and will ensure strong management and leadership during this transition.”

  • Early morning swim

    A small group of ducks  took advantage of the pleasant weather this morning and did a few laps around Ashley Pond.

  • County eyes its own radio system

    A Department of Homeland Security grant could help the county council determine whether or not to invest millions of dollars in an upgrade of the county’s public safety communications system.

    Los Alamos County Council voted 6-1 to approve a $68,775 New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management grant during a meeting in March.

    Councilor Vincent Chiravalle cast the lone no vote.

    The grant will be used to expand on a 2009 study that looked at optic fiber, broadband and radio, Emergency Management Coordinator Phil Taylor told the Los Alamos Monitor. Crestino Telecommunications Solutions, a consulting firm based in Albuquerque, conducted the study under the county’s information and technology department.

  • FBI takes aim at public corruption

    The FBI in Albuquerque and its law enforcement partners have announced several initiatives designed to make it easier for New Mexico residents to report public corruption and for the FBI and its partners to work more effectively together.

    A new hotline is available for anyone wanting to report public corruption to the FBI in Albuquerque.

    Public corruption undermines the nation’s security and the people’s trust in their government while wasting billions of tax dollars, said Albuquerque FBI Public Affairs Specialist Frank Fisher Foster, adding that public corruption includes corrupt public officials, border corruption, economic stimulus fraud, abuse of government contracting authority and many other examples.

  • Spring has sprung

    A variety of bulbs have bloomed - proof that spring has arrived in Los Alamos.

  • PNM request for interim rate relief rejected

    SANTA FE — The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission has rejected a request by the state’s largest electric utility for interim relief as regulators consider whether to approve a proposed rate increase.
    The commission turned down Public Service Company of New Mexico’s request on Thursday.
    PNM wanted to begin the first phase of an $85 million rate increase that was negotiated by the utility and other groups as part of a stipulation that has yet to be considered by the commission.
    The interim rate increase would have totaled $45 million.
    The commission’s general counsel found that PNM failed to show immediate irreparable harm in its filing for interim relief.

  • Dow reaches 2011 high after unemployment falls

    NEW YORK (AP) — A two-year low in the unemployment rate sent the Dow Jones industrial average to a new 2011 high Friday.

    The Labor Department said the unemployment rate fell to 8.8 percent, the lowest since March 2009, as companies added workers at the fastest two-month pace since before the recession began. Approximately 216,000 new jobs were added to the economy last month, offsetting layoffs in local governments. Economists had expected the unemployment rate to remain at 8.9 percent.

  • Flotsam from Japan's tsunami to hit US West Coast

    SEATTLE (AP) — John Anderson has discovered just about everything during the 30 years he's combed Washington state's beaches — glass fishing floats, hockey gloves, bottled messages, even hundreds of mismatched pairs of Nike sneakers that washed up barnacled but otherwise unworn.

    The biggest haul may come in one to three years when, scientists say, wind and ocean currents eventually will push some of the massive debris from Japan's tsunami and earthquake onto the shores of the U.S. West Coast.

  • Joke's on New England with April Fools' snowstorm

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — An April Fools' storm brought heavy snowfall to parts of New England on Friday, creating a late-season winter wonderland and giving thousands of kids a reprieve from school while causing agony for others with power outages and cars sliding off roads.

    The spring Nor'easter was expected to last through the day Friday — April Fools' Day — dropping up to a foot of snow around parts of northern New England, a bitter prank on residents eager for spring after a long, snow-filled winter.

  • Japan's PM vows to win battle against nuke plant--video extra

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's prime minister sounded a resolute note Friday, promising to win the battle against an overheating nuclear plant even as atomic safety officials raised questions about the accuracy of radiation measurements at the complex.

    Naoto Kan was grave a week ago when he addressed this nation rattled by fears of radiation that has contaminated food, milk and tap water. But three weeks after a massive tsunami disabled a nuclear power plant's cooling systems, Kan vowed that Japan would create the safest system anywhere.