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Local News

  • Raw: NH Residents Cast First Election Day Votes
  • Control of NM statehouse up for grabs


    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A costly fight for control of the Legislature comes to an end Tuesday as voters decide whether Republicans will gain a majority in the House for the first time in nearly 60 years and top Democratic Senate leaders can survive efforts by GOP Gov. Susana Martinez to oust them.

    The first-term governor, who wasn't up for re-election this year, used her political popularity and fundraising muscle to aid Republican candidates across the state and potentially transform legislative elections into a referendum on her policies, including a proposal to stop New Mexico from issuing driver's licenses to illegal immigrants.

    Victories for governor-backed candidates could give Martinez more GOP support in the Legislature and possible clout in pressuring Democrats in the House and Senate to agree to her legislative agenda.

    GOP and Democratic-leaning political action committees have dumped more than $3 million into the general election campaign, an unprecedented amount for legislative races in New Mexico.

  • Today in History for November 6th
  • 10 things to know for Tuesday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on Tuesday:

    1. PRESIDENTIAL POLLS PREDICT A VIRTUAL TIE

    In dash to the finish, Obama and Romney make their appeals to an ever-smaller universe of undecided voters. The most accurate election forecasting model from the University of Colorado still shows a landslide victory for Mitt Romney.

    2. TUESDAY'S THE (SORT OF) BIG DAY

    With all the early and absentee voting, Election Day just isn't what it used to be.

    3. HOW SANDY UPENDED NYC COUPLE'S 'DREAM HOME'

    The AP's Dennis Waszak Jr. tells the harrowing story of how he, his wife and their three children lived through the superstorm. The Obama administration's response to aid victims has raised the ire of survivors as a new storm approaches the area.

    4. SYRIAN TURMOIL GOES FROM BAD TO WORSE

  • Clarification to Sunday charter report

    This is a clarification to the "Voters to weigh in on Charter proposals" story that published in the Sunday edition:

    Los Alamos resident Greg White, who was quoted in the report, followed up to say that he did not object to the publication of the Charter changes in the legislative format as was reported. White said that his objection revolves around what he believes, which is that Charter provision 900.3 was not being followed which requires that the full and final text of changes  be published 20 days before the election.

    White contends that the piecemeal nature in which the proposed changes were made available does not live up to the requirements or the spirit of the Charter. 

  • Today in History for November 5th
  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on Monday:

    WHITE HOUSE RACE COMES DOWN TO THE WIRE

    Two days from judgment by the voters, Obama and Romney stress their differences on the economy, health care and more while professing an eagerness to work across party lines and end Washington gridlock.

    WHAT NEW WEATHER SYSTEM LOOMS ON HORIZON

    As many storm victims in N.Y. and N.J. try to keep warm amid falling temperatures, a powerful Nor'easter could reach the region by midweek.

    STORM-RAVAGED SECTIONS OF N.Y., N.J. PREPARE TO VOTE

    Barely a week after Superstorm Sandy hit, organizers in the Northeast express guarded optimism that the presidential election will proceed with little disruption.

    SYRIAN REBELS CAPTURE OILFIELD

  • Did you remember to fall back?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans got an extra hour of sleep this weekend thanks to the annual shift back to standard time. Officially, the change occured at 2 a.m. Sunday, but most people set their clocks back before hitting the sack Saturday night.

    Remember, the time fell back an hour. Otherwise, you will be an hour early on Sunday for church, golf, brunch or whatever.

    Residents of Hawaii, most of Arizona and some U.S. territories don't have to change since they do not observe daylight-saving time.

    Public safety officials say this is also a good time to put a new battery in the smoke alarm, no matter where you live.

    Daylight saving time returns at 2 a.m. local time the second Sunday in March.

  • Today in history for November 4th
  • Sandoval, LAFD recover two bodies from wilderness area

    The fire departments of Sandoval and Los Alamos County were involved in recovering two bodies from the Sandoval County wilderness area Saturday.

    The first incident involved a man who was reported missing by his family Friday after he did not return from a morning hike in the Jemez Mountains, according to New Mexico State Police spokesman Robert McDonald.

    The hiker's vehicle was found Friday night by Sandoval County Sheriff deputies.

    The case was transferred to State Police because it turned into a search and rescue case.

    Search and rescue crews found the man's body at the bottom of an approximate 100-foot cliff near Forest Road 10 and Forest Road 269.

    The hiker has been identified as Thomas Ilg, 54, of Los Alamos. He was a Los Alamos National Laboratory employee, according to the facility's website. Ilg reportedly had worked at the lab since 1996.

    Ilg’s neighbors were saddened and shocked to hear the news, but also said they did not know him well.

    “I knew his wife, Wendy but I did not know him very well,” said one neighbor. “That is horrible; I do know they’ve lived in this neighborhood a long time. How awful,” the neighbor said.

    McDonald said the family said Ilg was an experienced hiker.