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Local News

  • 1 girl in Connecticut shooting from Rio Rancho

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — One of the school children killed in a mass shooting in Connecticut attended school in Rio Rancho last year before her family moved.

    Rio Rancho Public School District officials confirmed that Emilie Parker went to Maggie Cordova Elementary last year.

    Her father Robbie Parker was one of the first parents to speak out about the shooting the day after Friday's massacre that left 20 school children and six adults dead at a school. He says he's blessed to be Emilie's dad.

    Neighbors who knew the Parkers told the Albuquerque Journal they were kind and quiet and were active members of the Mormon church down the road.

    Rio Rancho Public Schools spokeswoman Kim Vesely told KOB-TV teachers and staff across the district have been deeply affected since hearing the news.

  • Police: NM man stabbed man over loud child

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An Albuquerque man is facing attempted murder charges after police say he stabbed his neighbor because the victim's young niece was too loud.

    KRQE-TV reports (http://bit.ly/UUN7Ro) that Marco Rodriquez was ordered held last week on $1 million cash bail following the alleged stabbing.

    The sister of the victim, who has not been identified, told detectives that Rodriguez and two others stormed her Albuquerque apartment Thursday after her young daughter began jumping in the living room. Police say Rodriguez was in the apartment below.

    The woman told police that two people held her brother as Rodriguez stabbed him.

    The victim's status was not known.

    Court records don't list an attorney for Rodriguez.

  • Today in History for December 17th
  • Police: Conn. Shooter Had Hundreds of Bullets
  • Raw: 4,000 Santas Go for a Run

    More than four-thousand people dressed as Santa Claus took part in a charity race in Issy-les-Moulineaux, just outside Paris, on Sunday. The aim of the "Corrida de Noel" was to support organizations that help people from the third world.

  • Today in History for December 16th
  • Former worker settles suit against county

    Los Alamos County settled with former Parks and Recreation employee Melody Cross for $175,000 after Cross filed two lawsuits in the First Judicial District Court with the complaint for infliction of emotional distress, prima facie tort, battery and punitive damages.

    According to court documents, Cross was employed as a senior office specialist with the parks division. Defendants Los Alamos County, Richard McIntyre and Randy Lucero denied all of the allegations in the suit.

    But the county still paid up.

    Cross and James Sullivan, an attorney representing Los Alamos County signed an out-of-court release and settlement agreement Aug. 16.

    County Administrator Harry Burgess, who was hired a year ago in November, said Thursday, “It was a settlement negotiated by our insurance carrier. It was not during a normal settlement conference. We were informed of the settlement after the fact.”

    Burgess said there was no ruling on the accusations leveled by Cross against McIntyre, parks division manager for the county and Lucero who was acting parks superintendent at the time.

    “We don’t believe them to be true. That is the county’s position. The accusations were not valid. I can’t say anything specific about the case because it’s a personnel issue.”

  • Trails rise from the ashes

    Hikers and cyclists who have ventured onto national forest trails surrounding Los Alamos have been pleasantly surprised.

    County Open Space Specialist Craig Martin recounted a typical story.

    “When we were working on the Water Canyon trail in September, two residents of White Rock walked up and said, ‘We thought we were just going to have to fight through everything to get to this point here. We got here and it was a trail. We were amazed.”

    “So I think it’s just a matter of awareness. A lot of people don’t realize how much we’ve brought back over the summer, so they’re reluctant to go up there,” Martin said.

    Española Ranger District Recreation Team Leader Lynn Bjorklund credits volunteers and Martin himself for approximately 18 miles of trail that have been rebuilt and repaired.

    “He’s been super lead volunteer of the volunteers,” Bjorklund said. “He’s led 800-plus hours of volunteer work. And that’s been able to pay for contract work on the farther away trails.”

    Funding for the contract work requires a 50 percent match in volunteer hours. Those 800 hours translated into $20,000 worth of work, bringing in an additional $40,000 in contract work.

  • With local closings, timing is everything

    It’s not easy calling a snow day, even in a small town like Los Alamos.

    According to officials involved in determining how and when things get canceled or postponed due to adverse weather conditions, there’s a lot of coordination and timing involved. Just ask Patricia Wolff, spokesperson for the New Mexico Department of Transportation.

    “It’s a decision that has to made first by the county administrator,” she said. “He starts assessing a variety of reports as soon as he’s contacted.”

    Reports from public works, road crews, police, fire, emergency rescue, all come across his desk, where he then weighs the options.

    “He would then consult with those department heads and examine weather reports, and then start contacting officials at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the school system” Wolff said.

    LANL has just more than 10,000 employees and Los Alamos Public Schools has about 3,500 students, Guiding the decisions of the decision makers is safety and timing.

    “People need to appreciate how many conversations happen in a short amount of time between all the stakeholders,” LAPS Superintendent Gene Schmidt said.

  • NM contingent gets assignments

    U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-N.M.) will begin serving on the Senate Committee on Appropriations in the New Year, his office reported this week.

    “A seat on the Appropriations Committee is very meaningful for New Mexico,” Udall said. “From the labs, to the military bases and our public lands, we have a large federal presence in our state. I have no illusions about the difficult economic times and budgetary constraints our nation is facing, and I am eager to do my best and defend New Mexico through the appropriations process.”

    Udall was an appropriator in the House of Representatives from 2006-2008 before being elected to the Senate.
    In addition to Appropriations, he will continue serving on the committees on Foreign Relations Environment and Public Works, Indian Affairs and Rules and Administration.

    U.S. Rep. Martin Heinrich will serve on the Energy and Natural Resources, Intelligence, and Joint Economic committees when he moves to the senate in the 113th Congress. Heinrich, who replaces retiring U.S. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-New Mexico, issued the following statement regarding his committee assignments: