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Local News

  • US issues mail advisory, tightens cargo scrutiny

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. and allied governments tightened their scrutiny of air cargo and shipped packages Monday as investigators tried to trace bomb parts and scanned for more mail bombs possibly sent from Yemen.

    An official United Arab Emirates security source said authorities are tracing the serial numbers of a mobile phone circuit board and computer printer used in a mail bomb sent from Yemen and found in Dubai last week.

  • Update 10-31-10

    Fuller Lodge Board meeting

    The Fuller Lodge/Historic District Advisory Board will meet from 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesday in the community building’s training room.
    The board will discuss an assessment report, homestead subcommittee charter and members and how to make boards and commissions more effective. The board will also review a draft Fuller Lodge Historic District ordinance. Working group reports will include CLG grants, heritage tourism, historic resources, ordinance and guidelines and training.

  • DPU scraps 10 percent rate hike

    The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities has scrapped plans to ask for a 10 percent increase in favor of looking at other options and bringing the rate issue back to the Utilities Board.

    The board will discuss the alternatives at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 15 at the DPU office at 170 Central Park Square.

    Timing played a role in the decision to waive off on pushing for a rate hike. Council tabled the electric rate issue during their Aug. 24 meeting and instructed John Arrowsmith, manager of DPU, to return to the council with a proposal in 30 days.

  • Avoiding fire dangers through the winter

    Using wood and solid fuels to keep homes warm comes with inherent risks. It’s important to understand those risks given the fact that more than one-third of local residents use fireplaces, wood stoves and other fuel-fired appliances as primary heat sources in their homes, according to the National Fire Safety Council.

  • NMAC president pays a visit

    To better learn the needs of the county, President Mary Ann Sedillo of the New Mexico Association of Counties met with local officials and senior management Tuesday at the Community Building.
    Sedillo received the NMAC Soaring Eagle Award at this year’s final board meeting in Socorro Oct. 8 for her service and efforts to improve the quality of life for all New Mexico citizens.
    “I’m visiting all 33 counties in the state to learn what your needs are,” Sedillo told the group assembled in council chambers.

  • Negotiations with IMTEC conclude

    Los Alamos County officials announced today that the county has successfully concluded negotiations with IMTEC on the payment of the principal and interest owed to the county for a small business loan, keeping approximately $2.1 million in economic development loan funds.

  • Yemeni arrested, al-Qaida bomber eyed in mail plot

    SAN'A, Yemen (AP) — Yemeni police arrested a woman on suspicion of mailing a pair of bombs powerful enough to take down airplanes, officials said Saturday as details emerged about a terrorist plot aimed at the U.S. that exploited security gaps in the worldwide shipping system.

    Investigators were hunting Yemen for more suspects tied to al-Qaida and several U.S. officials identified the terrorist group's top explosives expert in Yemen as the most likely bombmaker.

  • US-bound bomb could have exploded, downed plane

    WASHINGTON (AP) — At least one of the mail bombs shipped to the United States could have detonated and downed a cargo plane if undiscovered, a British official said Saturday as investigators hunted for terrorists in Yemen.

    The results of Britain's preliminary investigation escalated the seriousness of a plot that investigators said bore the hallmarks of al-Qaida.

  • Explosive packages reflect new Yemen terror threat

    SAN'A, Yemen (AP) — The discovery of two explosive-laden packages sent from Yemen and aimed at U.S. and Western interests represents a new escalation in the terror threat emanating from this violence-wracked, poverty-stricken Mideast country.

    President Barack Obama stopped short of linking the failed plot to al-Qaida in Yemen, but U.S. officials said privately they were increasingly confident that was the source. Obama's counterterrorism adviser John Brennan called the Yemeni wing the most active al-Qaida franchise.

  • Terror plot discovered as US-bound explosives seized

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Authorities on three continents thwarted multiple terrorist attacks aimed at the United States from Yemen on Friday, seizing two explosive packages addressed to Chicago-area synagogues and packed aboard cargo jets. The plot triggered worldwide fears that al-Qaida was launching a major new terror campaign.