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Local News

  • Transit plan divides county council

    A motion to amend the ordinance pertaining to stopping, standing and parking of buses and taxicabs was defeated Tuesday night by a four to three council vote.

    The current ordinance requires Atomic City Transit (ACT) operators to load or unload passengers only at a designated bus stop, bus stand, or passenger-loading zone, with the exception of Dial-a-Ride service for paratransit passengers.  

    Two changes were proposed for the ordinance. Council was in favor of a provision to relax the prohibition against blocking driveways to allow paratransit passengers to be picked up and dropped off at the end of their driveways.

  • Winter’s icy grip

    A cluster of icicles lend an added dimension to this evergreen near downtown Los Alamos. The first day of winter is still a couple of weeks away, but a winter storm blew through earlier in the week leaving behind a thick blanket of snow and frigid temperatures in its wake. Keven Todd/Monitor

  • Storm creates minimal impact

    Sunday night’s snowstorm went easy on Los Alamos County in terms of traffic accidents and power outages.

    “Because almost everything was closed Monday, there weren’t many cars on the streets so there weren’t accidents and the snow plows had an easier job of cleaning the roadways,” Los Alamos Police Capt. Randy Foster said. “It was really nice in that respect.”

    The worst part of the storm was the bitter cold temperatures lingering in the area, dipping well below the freezing mark.

  • Local store wins Google's national contest

    A local business, Pet Pangaea, is the national winner of the “My Business Story” video contest sponsored by Google and American Express.

    The video was created on the site youtube.com/MyBusinessStory, which was designed for small businesses to share their stories and encourage others to “Shop Small” on Small Business Saturday, Nov. 26.

    The Small Business Administration together with organizations across the country spearheaded the effort to inspire shoppers to support their small business sector by shopping locally on that day.

  • Council addresses other business

    The Los Alamos County Council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance authorizing the execution and delivery of a water project fund loan/grant agreement between the New Mexico Water Trust Board and the New Mexico Finance Authority and Los Alamos County in the amount of $350,000 ($140,000 zero interest loan/$210,000 grant) to finance the costs of preparing a conservation and reuse water master plan.
    The loan will be repaid from the water production fund.

  • VIDEO: Remembering the Day That Lives in Infamy

    About 120 survivors of the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor observed a moment of silence to commemorate the Japanese attack and the thousands who lost their lives that day 70 years ago Wednesday.

  • Update 12-07-11

    Road closure

    Northbound 15th Street between Central Avenue and Iris Street will be closed for utility work for the new municipal building. Detour signs are posted. For more information, call 662-8112.

    Parks and Rec

    The Parks and Recreation Board will meet at 5:30 p.m.. Thursday. They have changed the location of the meeting from the Training Room in the Aquatic Center to Fuller Lodge’s Pajarito Room.

    LWV lunch

    Los Alamos County Water and Energy Conservation Coordinator Christine Chavez will be the speaker at the League of Women Voters’ Lunch with a Leader Thursday at Central Avenue Grill.

    LTAB meeting

  • Vets request Pearl Harbor burial

    HONOLULU (AP) — Lee Soucy decided five years ago that when he died he wanted to join his shipmates killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

    Soucy lived to be 90, passing away just last year. On Tuesday, seven decades after dozens of fellow sailors were killed when the USS Utah sank on Dec. 7, 1941; a Navy diver took a small urn containing his ashes and put it in a porthole of the ship.

    The ceremony is one of five memorials being held for servicemen who lived through the assault and want their remains placed in Pearl Harbor out of pride and affinity for those they left behind.

    “They want to return and be with the shipmates that they lost during the attack,” said Jim Taylor, a retired sailor who coordinates the ceremonies.

  • Former principal follows his dream

    A conversation with a student was the final straw for Principal Mike Katko to make a career change. The 12-year-old girl at the Sixth Grade Academy in Pojoaque where Katko was principal appeared depressed, he recalled, as she informed him that she intended to quit school as soon as she was old enough.

    “You can’t do that,” he said. “Stay in school so you can live your dreams.”

    Katko recalled that she thought about his words for several moments before asking, “What was your dream Mr. Katko?”

    He answered without hesitation, “A writer ... All my life I wanted to be a writer and live that lifestyle.”

  • Council approves consortium grant

    In a unanimous decision, council approved a request by the New Mexico Consortium, Inc. (NMC) for additional economic development support.

    The new ordinance grants the consortium $2 million for the construction of a new research laboratory facility and a grant of lot 6B-1 (estimated value of $640,000) in the Entrada Research Park. The grant will be paid for from approximately $9 million in New Mexico Local Economic Development Act (LEDA) funds available in FY 2012.

    The new ordinance nullifies an ordinance passed in June that granted NMC $1.5 million for laboratory infrastructure and equipment. That grant facilitated NMC’s recruitment of Dr. Richard Sayre, a leading researcher in algae and plant cell metabolism, who joined the consortium in October.