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Local News

  • SD governor signs 3-day wait for abortion into law

    PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard signed a law Tuesday requiring women to wait three days after meeting with a doctor to have an abortion, the longest waiting period in the nation.

    Abortion rights groups have already said they plan to file a lawsuit challenging the measure, which also requires women to undergo counseling at pregnancy help centers that discourage abortions.

  • As Japan mourns dead, many bodies remain missing

    NATORI, Japan (AP) — Those in search of the dead go to Natori's bowling alley, walking up the cracked concrete steps and through the glass door. "Enjoy Coca-Cola," says a neon sign out front.

    They go under the two-story painting of the bowling ball crashing into giant pins. They walk past the lists of the dead and the descriptions of the bodies yet to be identified. Inside, they step slowly through the makeshift morgue, peering into satin-wrapped coffins arranged in neat rows where bowlers so recently faced off.

    They rarely find the people they seek.

  • Japanese police say disaster death toll near 9,100

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's police agency says nearly 9,100 people are dead after an earthquake and tsunami. Almost 13,800 are missing.

    Those tallies are likely to overlap, but police officials estimate that the final figure will likely exceed 18,000 deaths.

    A police spokesman from one of the of the hardest-hit prefectures, Miyagi, estimates that the deaths will top 15,000 in that region alone. Police in other devastated areas declined to estimate eventual tolls, but said the confirmed deaths in their areas already number nearly 3,400.

  • Israeli aircraft strike Gaza

    JERUSALEM (AP) — The Israeli military struck a series of Palestinian militant targets in the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, damaging smuggling tunnels and suspected weapons sites. Palestinian officials said 19 people were wounded.

    Israel's volatile border with Gaza has been largely quiet since an overwhelming Israeli military offensive two years ago. But Israeli officials say Gaza's ruling Hamas militant group has recovered from the fighting, and the area has begun to heat up in recent weeks.

    Palestinian health official Adham Abu Salmia said one man was critically wounded in a border clash Tuesday.

    The Israeli army confirmed the incident, saying it opened fire at a group of militants who were about to fire a missile at a tank.

  • US jet crashes in Libya, both crew are safe--video

    BU MARIEM, Libya (AP) — An American fighter jet crashed in Libya's rebel held east, both crew ejecting safely as the aircraft spun from the sky during the third night of the U.S. and European air campaign. Moammar Gadhafi's forces shelled rebels regrouping in the dunes outside a key eastern city on Tuesday, and his snipers and tanks roamed the last major opposition-held city in the west.

  • US sees few good options if Yemen government falls

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For two years, the Obama administration has had a relationship of convenience with Yemen: The U.S. kept the Yemeni government armed and flush with cash. In return, Yemen's leaders helped fight al-Qaida or, as often, looked the other way while the U.S. did.

    That relationship is about to get a lot less convenient.

    Of all the uprisings and protests that have swept the Middle East this year, none is more likely than Yemen to have immediate damaging effects on U.S. counterterrorism efforts. Yemen is home to al-Qaida's most active franchise, and as President Ali Abdullah Saleh's government crumbles, so does Washington's influence there.

  • Libya rebels struggle to regroup; US jet crashes

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi's forces shelled rebels regrouping outside a strategic eastern city on Tuesday and his snipers and tanks controlled the streets of the last opposition-held city in the west, signaling a prolonged battle ahead. An American fighter jet crashed over North African country, both crew ejecting safely.

    The U.S. Africa Command said both crewmembers were safe after what was believed to be a mechanical failure of the Air Force F-15.

    Disorganization among the rebels could hamper their attempts to exploit the air campaign by U.S. and European militaries. Since the uprising began on Feb. 15, the opposition has been made up of disparate groups even as it took control of the entire east of the country.

  • Gadhafi's forces, Libyan rebels face standoff--video

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi's forces lobbed artillery shells at rebels regrouping outside a strategic eastern city, forcing a band of fighters to scatter and signaling a prolonged battle as the U.S. said it was shifting its focus to widening a no-fly zone across the North African country.

    The first round of the allied assault over the weekend smashed a column of regime tanks that had been moving on the rebel stronghold of Benghazi in the east, reversing the government's advance and allowing the rebels to barrel to west, vowing to break a siege on Ajdabiya, a city of 140,000 that is the gateway to the east.

  • Missing Virginia teacher's body located in Japan

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A Virginia couple is mourning the death of their daughter after learning that her body was found in disaster-ravaged Japan, where she had been teaching English.

    Taylor Anderson, 24, could be the first known American victim in the Japan disaster as authorities continue the daunting task of finding and identifying almost 13,000 people believed to be missing.

    Anderson's family said in a statement that the U.S. Embassy in Japan called them Monday to tell them she was found in Ishinomaki, a city about 240 miles (390 kilometers) north of Tokyo.

  • Pool boils at Japan nuke plant as evacuees weary

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Weariness and anxiety percolated Tuesday among people who left their homes near Japan's radiation-shedding nuclear complex as workers tried urgently to cool an overheated storage pool and methodically to reconnect critical cooling systems.

    In another day of progress and setbacks, a pool holding spent nuclear fuel heated up to around the boiling point, a nuclear safety official said. With water bubbling away, there is a risk that more radioactive steam could spew out. "We cannot leave this alone and we must take care of it as quickly as possible," said the official, Hidehiko Nishiyama.