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Local News

  • County signs new deal with Comcast

    Los Alamos County councilors shook the dust off a 16-year-old franchise agreement with cable provider Comcast and approved a renewal Tuesday.

    The renewal grants Comcast the right to use the county’s easements and right-of-ways for its “plain vanilla” cable for 10 years, said Nann Winter of the Albuquerque law firm retained by the council to work on the renewal.

    The agreement sets a franchise fee of 5 percent of Comcast’s gross revenue; which was increased from the 3 percent established in the expired agreement.

  • Smith's Food & Drug Center union wages contract battle

    Negotiations have hit an impasse and the labor union representing Smith’s Food & Drug Center employees in Los Alamos and elsewhere in New Mexico has called in a federal mediator.

    On Sunday, 400-500 employees rallied outside Smith’s Albuquerque corporate office over what they call “corporate greed.”

    Read the whole story in today's Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Breaking News Injured Cyclist Flown to Albuquerque

    A well-known senior cyclist was seriously injured after crashing into a guard area near the bottom of Pajarito Ski Hill early this afternoon.

    A medical helicopter out of Santa Fe transported the man to UNM Hospital in Albuquerque.

    Check back for more details.

     

  • AG's office issues warning about phone scams

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The attorney general's Consumer Protection Division is alerting consumers about scams currently circulating in New Mexico.

    They involve a phone call telling a supposed "winner" about second prize in a contest for a Mercedes Benz and $850,000 or a "Two Million Dollar Mega Lottery."

    But the consumer has to send cash and personal information to get the prize.

    The Consumer Protection Division says people can recognize a scam when they're notified about a lottery or sweepstakes they didn't enter.

  • Don't miss this week's Police Beat

    Get the latest on local police activity here.

  • NM revenues weaken, more state budget cuts loom

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's revenues are lower than expected for the newly started fiscal year, and it will force a new round of budget cuts to trim spending by about 3 percent.

    The Legislative Finance Committee received an updated financial forecast Wednesday, showing the state with a $200 million budget shortfall in the fiscal year that started this month.

    Revenues are projected to be almost $160 million lower than what had been anticipated this year, and $32 million short in the fiscal year that ended in June.

  • Obama signs sweeping financial overhaul into law

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Reveling in victory, President Barack Obama on Wednesday signed into law the most sweeping reform of financial regulations since the Great Depression, a package that aims to protect consumers and ensure economic stability from Main Street to Wall Street.

  • US announces new sanctions against North Korea

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Obama administration moved Wednesday to push new sanctions against North Korea over its nuclear weapons program, as Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Defense Secretary Robert Gates showed solidarity with South Korea during a visit to the area that separates it from the North.

  • ‘Cool roofs’ coming to LANL

    Cool is, well, cool.

    And in an era where going green is everything, count Los Alamos National Laboratory in.

    Under a DOE program, the lab will be adding “cool roof” technologies — using lighter-colored roofing surfaces or special coatings to reflect the sun’s heat.

    The result? Less urban heat, more efficiencies, reduced cooling costs and offsetting carbon emissions.

    The announcement came Tuesday from U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu.

  • Obama signs financial overhaul bill

    WASHINGTON — Reveling in victory, President Barack Obama on Wednesday signed into law the most sweeping overhaul of financial regulations since the Great Depression, a package that aims to protect consumers and ensure economic stability from Main Street to Wall Street.

    The law, pushed through mainly by Democrats in Washington’s deeply partisan environment, comes almost two years after the infamous near financial meltdown in 2008 in the United States that was felt around the globe.